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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Throw everything in the Pot soup?
Posted by: BluesSinger, Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 6:34pm
I'm thinking of attempting to make a vegetable soup where I just throw all the vegies i have in the fridge in a pot with some beef or chicken broth, and maybe noodles or rice and let it cook.. and maybe add some chicken later.

Thoughts? suggestions?  I have zucchini, turnips, mustard greens, kale, collards, onions, garlic, carrots....
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 6:53pm; Reply: 1
Soups are a great way to encourage ourselves to eat a wide variety of vegetables - I highly support the practice.

A couple of things have helped me to produce a rich soup, rather than a pot of flavored water with vegetables floating in it:

Begin with a genuine, homemade bone stock. The day before, simmer grass-fed (if possible) beef knuckle bones in plenty of water all day or all night.  Lamb or turkey bones are good also, but the flavor changes accordingly.  And the knuckle bones are the ones that give that amazing "gel".  Strain into a jar, chill overnight and discard the thick solid layer of fat that rises to the top, then use the stock as the liquid or part of it.

Start the soup by stir-frying lots of onions, garlic (I use ghee) until they become transparent and the smell loses it's sharpness.  Then add a lot of chopped mushrooms and maybe some extra fat.  Stir-fry those until they reduce in volume and begin to smell very good.

At that point, add the liquid and all the other chopped vegetables.

Happy eating!  :D
Posted by: kitari, Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 7:34pm; Reply: 2
Quoted from BluesSinger
I'm thinking of attempting to make a vegetable soup where I just throw all the vegies i have in the fridge in a pot with some beef or chicken broth, and maybe noodles or rice and let it cook.. and maybe add some chicken later.

Thoughts? suggestions?  I have zucchini, turnips, mustard greens, kale, collards, onions, garlic, carrots....


I buy a big assortment of compliant herbs and spices at a store that sells them in bulk and then I put them in a coffee/herb grinder, mix them all together and put in a jar.  I use a spoonful of this for a background flavor to all my soups, it seems to add an extra layer of flavor so they aren't so one demensional.  Then if there is a single herb/spice I want to stand out I add more of that one flavoring.
I find I like my mixed vegetable soup to have just a small amount of chopped leafy greens as too many seems to clog up the soup.  If I want to use up some leafy greens in a soup I have made a creamed spinach soup that I used a big bunch of greens, some onion and spices, and then blend it to a puree. I start it out with a rice flour roux to give it a creamy flavor/texture.

I do love soup but I am a lazy cook so I do take shortcuts.
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 8:09pm; Reply: 3
Quoted from Victoria
A couple of things have helped me to produce a rich soup, rather than a pot of flavored water with vegetables floating in it:.....


This struck me as being completely hilarious! Thanks for the laugh! The fight for a really good soup takes a few struggles! Especially when you have to start all over again after nearly fifty years of NOT making something that would be beneficial to your type. This is when the stock and the herbs/spices really shine. I wish I could have mushrooms that were easy to find......
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 8:36pm; Reply: 4
Try using a cup or two of dried white beans of a complient variety with what you mentioned. Just let them cook with the meat till the beans start to soften. Then add the veggies.
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 9:28pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
Try using a cup or two of dried white beans of a complient variety with what you mentioned. Just let them cook with the meat till the beans start to soften. Then add the veggies.

I'm with you here, GCG! In fact, I made a big pot of soup this AM and added Great Northerns - the lentils needed a little help from all the delicious smoothness only they can give! Yum! (I had soaked them overnight, of course.)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 10:21pm; Reply: 6
I suggest roasting some of the vegetables before adding the other ingredients. Carrots, celery, garlic, zucchini, and turnips can be roasted or sauteed in olive oil (or another compliant oil or fat,  but I wouldn't add the greens until you add the liquid. They're especially flavorful if you add some salt with the pre-cooking- and IMO absolutely essential if you're making a vegetarian soup. Bone broth will make for a tasty soup even without the pre-roasting step.

If you're going to add beans, I suggest pre-cooking the beans in different (un-salted) water before draining and adding to the other ingredients. It makes the beans more digestible, as well as ensuring that the beans are fully cooked when the rest of the ingredients are.

You can add rice or "traditional" pasta to soup, but rice pasta tends to fall apart when cooked too long, as well as making the cooking water kind of icky from the starch cooking out of the pasta and into the water. If you're going to use rice noodles in soup, I'd suggest cooking them separately and adding right before serving. I'd also suggest storing the leftover rice noodles separately from the leftover soup.
Posted by: ProudWarrior, Wednesday, March 13, 2013, 5:52pm; Reply: 7
Ruthiegirl you are so smart - I never thought of storing the noodles seperate- that makes so much sense. I used to hate leftovers with rice noodles- because they got mushy in the left over soup and made the broth murky. Now I can make big batches of soup and save it - instead of just small batches and hope for no leftovers :) I feel so silly not to have thought of that myself :)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, March 13, 2013, 6:08pm; Reply: 8
I learned that the hard way with pasta and sauce. I usually put them away separately in case the person wanting pasta wanted a different sauce and/or the person wanting sauce wanted it on something other than pasta (such as tomato sauce for pizza or cheese sauce on veggies.) Once I had about one serving's left of both so I stored them together, and it just wasn't as nice later.
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