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Teenage A nonnie  This thread currently has 2,390 views. Print Print Thread
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Caz B
Friday, September 26, 2008, 4:34am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Hi all,

I am trying to encourage my 13yr old daughter who is an A nonnie to take some responsibility for her own health.  I have asked her if she will attempt to follow the BTD as much as she can but she is not happy to give up chocolate and ice-cream in moderation.

Could anyone suggest to me the biggest avoids for an A nonnie?  If we could work on one or two at a time it would be good and I'd like to work on the nastiest ones for her health first.

Many thanks


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Planning to overcome Asthma and Adrenal Fatigue with SWAMI.  

Husband 49yrs, A+ Sec * DD 19yrs, A+ Non * DD 14yrs O

John 14:6 - Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.
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Maria Giovanna
Friday, September 26, 2008, 9:31am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I would buy for your girl natural yoghurt (or homemade soy yoghurt) and froze it with agave syrup, crushed walnut or pine nuts, her preferred fruit and for her chocolate love some extrabitter chocolate with a touch of agave or honey if it is too bitter for her.
Wheat, corn, beef, pork and nightshades are the red flags for As, I'd find out some favorite rice, amaranth, quinoa, oat recipes (whole grain , flour as muffins ad pancakes for her carbos) as turkey and fish recipes she likes.
Hope it helps
Maria Giovanna


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Andrea AWsec
Friday, September 26, 2008, 11:48am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Caz is she a sick nonnie?

Teens have so much peer pressue, even with food choices.

I know in ER Peter talks about being a kid and his father feeding him a type A diet.  At the time hippies were the only ones that ate tofu.


MIFHI

"Do not try to satisfy your vanity by teaching a great many things. Awaken people's curiosity. It is enough to open minds; do not overload them." Anatole France

"Healthy people have the least overt symptoms from eating avoid foods." Dr. D'Adamo
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Raquel
Friday, September 26, 2008, 11:56am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Cas B, My son (A nonnie) is 9 y.o and 3 years on BTD. He is agree with following BTD because he really knows that when he is out BTD he doesnt  feel good health...(sinusitis, colds,allergies)
He has learned the important that is for health eat by BTD...

Dairy and all that Maria Giovanna said are red flags!!!
recipe central can hepl a lot....I use carob instead chocolate...and he loves it..


Teacher's motto, "all you need is love".
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Caz B
Friday, September 26, 2008, 12:09pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I wouldn't say she is a sick nonnie but she has always had skin, tummy and health issues.  She used to get the most terrible giant hives until we worked out not to give her soy or strawberries.  She also used to suffer terribly with tonsillitis but we got that sorted out. She still gets some tummy aches, bloating and diarrhea at times and she often sounds like she has a stuffed nose.  I just want her to eat the best diet possible within reason and understanding that she is a teenager and loves to be social.

I will try the frozen yoghurt but I may have to just buy the best I can and freeze it because I have not been able to get agave syrup as yet.  She says she hates carob  

We have really cut down on our beef intake replacing it with lamb and up until a couple of weeks ago have enjoyed turkey chops from our local supermarket but I haven't seen them at all the last couple of week and suspect they are not going to stock them anymore   We don't eat pork anymore.

We are baking with spelt and almond meal at the moment for cookies/cakes.  I guess our problem is still going to be dairy and some wheat/corn.  I have definitely cut back on these because I am avoiding them too.

Thanks for the options, I will ask her to read this thread so she can she that other A nonnies that follow the diet have given their advice.


Personality test ESTJ

Planning to overcome Asthma and Adrenal Fatigue with SWAMI.  

Husband 49yrs, A+ Sec * DD 19yrs, A+ Non * DD 14yrs O

John 14:6 - Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.
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Raquel
Friday, September 26, 2008, 7:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Caz B

  She says she hates carob  


Try other brand (the first I got was horrible)... carob, agave and soja or oat milk is delicious!!!  
My son A and me are nonnie, since we are on BTD no problems skin, allergies or diarrea...


Teacher's motto, "all you need is love".
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Ribbit
Saturday, September 27, 2008, 1:01am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Caz, when they're younger it's so much easier to be the boss of their food!  But at 13....?

Here's what I do with my daughter.  At a social event she'll ask for a piece of something I know has eggs for example.  I'll tell her, "You know it will make you sick if you eat it.  You will feel terrible tomorrow and regret eating it.  But I'm not going to tell you no this time.  I will let you make your decision."  That's just recently--up until now I've said, "No, you can't eat it because it will make you sick."  She knows that.  Every time she's sick from a food we talk about it in great detail.  She understands the problem well.  So generally she'll decide it's just not worth eating that food--and I'm so proud of her!  That's an incredible maturity to be able to sacrifice present desires because of future regrets.  It'll help her in every area of life later on, I believe--that development of self control.  However, there's been a time or two when she did choose to eat it anyway, knowing she would regret it.  And then the next day she'll admit (without pressure from me--I just feel so sorry for her when she's reacting to it!) that she shouldn't have eaten it.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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TJ
Saturday, September 27, 2008, 2:27am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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That's great stuff you're doing, Ribbit!  Many parents these days shelter their children from the consequences of their actions in all those little things, so that they aren't ready to deal with the consequences of the big things when they are out on their own.  Plus, when your daughter makes the decision, she owns that decision, and its consequences.  It's her decision, not yours, you just informed her so she could make it wisely.
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Ron-A-Non
Saturday, September 27, 2008, 6:06am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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All this reminds me of the Looney Tunes episode called "Haredevil Hare", where Bugs Bunny tricks the green Martian space dog into giving him back the stick of dynamite by getting into a back-and-forth "switcharoo" argument with him.  

Bugs escalates the heated exchange to the point where the dog finally "wins" by threatening Bugs with, "You take it, or I'll shove it down yer t'roat!!!"



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GfDIQqn5RI4&fmt=18

When I have children, this will be my strategy to get them to eat things... and I'll probably pronounce "t'roat" with the Brooklyn-ese accent, too, because I'm like that.
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Raquel
Saturday, September 27, 2008, 10:18am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Ribbit
Caz, when they're younger it's so much easier to be the boss of their food!  But at 13....?

Here's what I do with my daughter.  At a social event she'll ask for a piece of something I know has eggs for example.  I'll tell her, "You know it will make you sick if you eat it.  You will feel terrible tomorrow and regret eating it.  But I'm not going to tell you no this time.  I will let you make your decision."  That's just recently--up until now I've said, "No, you can't eat it because it will make you sick."  She knows that.  Every time she's sick from a food we talk about it in great detail.  She understands the problem well.  So generally she'll decide it's just not worth eating that food--and I'm so proud of her!  That's an incredible maturity to be able to sacrifice present desires because of future regrets.  It'll help her in every area of life later on, I believe--that development of self control.  However, there's been a time or two when she did choose to eat it anyway, knowing she would regret it.  And then the next day she'll admit (without pressure from me--I just feel so sorry for her when she's reacting to it!) that she shouldn't have eaten it.


Ribbit I agree with you, I did the same with my son. When he goes to a party he usually eat few avoids(little pizza,cake,popcorn at cinema,)  by himself decision, because he has conscience the important of BTD in his health...
So when he eats some avoids I give him ARA PLUS or QUERCITIN PLUS or DEFLECT A and it helps a lot...



Teacher's motto, "all you need is love".
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Ron-A-Non
Saturday, September 27, 2008, 10:29am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Quoted Text
Ribbit I agree with you, I did the same with my son. When he goes to a party he usually eat few avoids(little pizza,cake,popcorn at cinema,)  by himself decision, because he has conscience the important of BTD in his health...
So when he eats some avoids I give him ARA PLUS or QUERCITIN PLUS or DEFLECT A and it helps a lot...
Yes, Deflect A does help a lot, I've noticed.
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Caz B
Saturday, September 27, 2008, 11:02am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I do use Ribbit's "thing" with my girls, but unless they always have a reaction to a food (which they don't) they are less likely to care.

I will do the best I can to keep her avoids to a minimum and then I think she will start noticing the foods that give her trouble and don't agree with her (I hope).  


Personality test ESTJ

Planning to overcome Asthma and Adrenal Fatigue with SWAMI.  

Husband 49yrs, A+ Sec * DD 19yrs, A+ Non * DD 14yrs O

John 14:6 - Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.
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Raquel
Saturday, September 27, 2008, 12:48pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Sometimes people think that they dont have a bad reaction to avoids food, but if we are very attentive assurance you will notice it...in the skin, nervous, energy, digestion, stress, immune system, etc...  


Teacher's motto, "all you need is love".
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Ribbit
Saturday, September 27, 2008, 1:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Raquel
...in the skin, nervous, energy, digestion, stress, immune system, etc...  


...mood....


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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TJ
Saturday, September 27, 2008, 1:15pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Ribbit


...mood....


That's a big one for me.  That, and mental clarity.
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Ribbit
Saturday, September 27, 2008, 1:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Teaching our children to restrain themselves when it comes to food, mainly sugary food, helps them develop self control in other areas of life.  I hope that when my children are old enough to develop an interest in the opposite sex they will practice restraint there also.  And if we say, "You are free to make your decision, but my advice is to steer clear of this guy," they will be more likely to be able to say, "You're right.  I will wait for the right one," rather than plunging head-first into a "sugary" relationship because they've always done that.  If they aren't trained to say no to what they think they want, how will they ever be responsible adults who can make decisions based on anything but physical cravings?

That may sound like it contradicts earlier statements in threads where I talk about "nursing on demand" and "answering your baby's cries" but this is different.  I don't tell a baby to wait for food--they have no understanding and can only assume you don't care about them.  I do tell a 5 year old that if she'll deprive herself of cake, I'll make her something with carob (which she loves) when we get home.  Or, better yet, I make her something sweet before we go so she can eat it there and not have to deal with the temptation and struggle.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Raquel
Saturday, September 27, 2008, 1:32pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Ribbit
  I do tell a 5 year old that if she'll deprive herself of cake, I'll make her something with carob (which she loves) when we get home.  Or, better yet, I make her something sweet before we go so she can eat it there and not have to deal with the temptation and struggle.


Ribbit that is the same that I do with my son.... but you have 3 and me just 1...
you need a big home bakery!!!


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Ribbit
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That gives me an idea for a thread.  How about "What's Your Kitchen Like?"  And we can show pictures of what we have.  I'll have to go take some pics.  What better to do with a Saturday?   I guess I should go spider-hunting too, to make Diana happy.

I'd love to have a nice kitchen. One day, when we move, I hope to be able to design and build my own kitchen.  Or at least design it.  Somebody else will have to build it. I want a little sink that's just for produce so I don't risk contaminating my lettuce with DH's Tabasco-scrambled egg dish that's been in the sink three days.  I'd like a sink for washing dishes and dirty produce from the garden (and eggs, one day) next to the dishwasher.  But on a separate counter I'd love to have a little area with a small sink and a  wooden cutting board and my favorite knives right there waiting on me to make a salad.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Raquel
Sunday, September 28, 2008, 9:04am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Heidi
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I've only had one of my 14yo. daughters tested so far and she is an A nonnie. I have a feeling her twin is as well, and plan to have her tested in the next month or so.

I'd like to see her give up corn because I know how much better I feel without it but she is not ready for that yet. For now her big avoid is wheat and all other gluten grains. And we are working on greatly reducing her sugar intake.

The only other avoids she eats regularly are potatoes and parmesan cheese. She has had the advantage of being raised a vegetarian, so no meats to give up, and she never liked many dairy products so that isn't a problem. Maybe one day she will be willing to give up the last few avoids  



Rh-, ISFP, Super Taster, Non-Secretor 52% SWAMI-XP'd Explorer.

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Ron-A-Non
Monday, September 29, 2008, 5:34am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I had a Coke tonight, and the corn syrup gave me a splitting headache for at least two hours... Oh, the humanity.
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Ribbit
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Whee-heee!  That's one thing I can enjoy once every 4 months (that's about as often as I indulge in a soft drink--poisonous as they are) without any reaction.  Probably if I drank them often I would have Candida issues again.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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Kristin
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I have an A nonnie child too, that had skin issues, frequent ear infections,etc. as a small child. He is now 14 yo. We have been BTDing since he was about 4 so for most of his life we have been eating this way.

Like the rest of you, I have felt my role of parent to be one of educating about food choices, but to ultimately let my children decide what to eat when out with friends, at parties, etc. My A nonnie has been engaged in the BTD since he was about 11 and he reads my copy of Live Right more than I do... lol! He was the first to suspect that he might be a nonnie too. In restaurants, he tends to choose foods that are avoids but we don't go out to eat much. I don't fret about it. I had a friend who, with her first son, made sure that no sugar touched his lips for the first 7 years of his life until she could no longer control it. When he was young teen, her son went through a period of time when he consumed vast quantities of sugar. As a young adult, her son was able to recognize that the sugar binge time was related (in part) to not being allowed any sugar during his childhood years. So I think being controlling about our children's food choices has negative consequences as well.


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Caz B
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We have friends who allow no sugar in their childrens diet but when they are invited to a birthday party or something similar they go sugar mad.  I think a little in moderation is possibly the safer option.


Personality test ESTJ

Planning to overcome Asthma and Adrenal Fatigue with SWAMI.  

Husband 49yrs, A+ Sec * DD 19yrs, A+ Non * DD 14yrs O

John 14:6 - Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.
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Ribbit
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Quoted from Kristin
As a young adult, her son was able to recognize that the sugar binge time was related (in part) to not being allowed any sugar during his childhood years.


I came to the same conclusion as a young adult.  We were sugar deprived as children.  We grew up on whole raw milk, whole wheat, granola, veggies from the garden, and Mama sweetened with our own home-grown honey or maybe fructose.  The only time we had sugar was Christmas or at Grandmother's house during the summer (she bought us anything we wanted because she felt sorry for us), and we ate so much we made ourselves sick.  At least I did.  My weakness was chocolate-covered cherries.  My mom said she knew when I'd had anything sugary at school, especially chocolate, because I'd be an emotional wreck when I got home--crying, super-sensitive....My brothers would get hyper, but I would cry, she said.

I went through a binging period in my very early 20's.  I was having trouble with my blood sugar and I thought I would use candy to bring up a crash, and then eat protein.  Well, it was a never-ending cycle, obviously.  It didn't take me long to thank my mother for keeping me off sugar.  It's only been since GTD (January) that I could eat sugar and it not be a problem.  It's amazing.  I had two or three little squares of unbleached beet-sugar sweetened organic chocolate and I feel fine this morning.  I think cane sugar is worse for me than beet sugar.  Or maybe it's the bleaching process that's the problem.


ISTJ, BTD since 5/05.  Battling chronic Lyme disease since ~1985.

"Everything is permissible for me, but not everything is beneficial..."  I Corinthians 6:12

Family: 3 As, 1 B, 1 AB, 1 O
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