Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register


Main Forum Page  ♦   Latest Posts  ♦   Member Center  ♦   Search  ♦   Archives   ♦   Help   ♦   Log In/Out   ♦   Admins
Forum Login
Login Name: Create a new account
Password:     Forgot password

BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  Corn: Bigger Questions
Users Browsing Forum
Yahoo! Bot and 17 Guests

Corn: Bigger Questions  This thread currently has 805 views. Print Print Thread
2 Pages 1 2 All Recommend Thread
san j
Sunday, June 22, 2014, 10:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,301
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from dadamo's TYPEBase entry for "Corn"
Throughout Europe, "corn" has always been the generic name for any of the cereal grains; Europeans call corn maize , a derivative of the early American Indian word mahiz. In fact, before settlers came to the New World Europeans had never seen this food - called Indian corn by colonists. What a wonderfully versatile and useful gift the Indians gave the world. Everything on the corn plant can be used: the husks for TAMALES, the silk for medicinal tea, the kernels for food and the stalks for fodder. Corn is not only a popular food, but the foundation of many by-products including BOURBON, CORN FLOUR, CORNMEAL, CORN OIL, CORNSTARCH, CORN SYRUP, CORN WHISKEY and laundry starch. The multicolored Indian corn - used today mainly for decoration - has red, blue, brown and purple kernels. Horticulturists developed the two most popular varieties today - white (Country Gentleman) and yellow (Golden Bantam) corn.


1. The Bloodtype Question:

(The happy quote struck me as odd, considering there is only one BT subtype for which corn isn't an Avoid: It's a Neutral for A Secretors.)

What is it about corn itself -not GM corn- that is a problem for all BTs except A Secretors?

Lola has come up with a Peter D'Adamo quote about chicken and galactose on another thread that was quite specific for Bs.
Is there a similarly explanatory quote available re: Corn --- why this crop, that sustained the almost exclusively Type O American indigenous population for centuries (?millennia?) should have sickened them in large numbers but didn't? And turned out to be non-"toxic" only for those European colonists who were A Secretors?  

2. The Genotype Question:

Just as the GTD marks Chicken as an outright Avoid for NO Bs (it's a Black Dot for Nomads and Gatherers, a Neutral for Explorers), Corn is an Avoid for all genotypes except Hunters and Explorers, for whom it is a "Black Dot" (funny that only a tiny minority of this population is A Secretor).

Should the refinements of GTD and SWAMI be considered to invalidate D'Adamo's TypeBase classifications, therefore?

This calls for an explanation of what it is about Corn (and chicken, why not?) that makes it so "damaging" to so many.


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004

Revision History (1 edits)
san j  -  Monday, June 23, 2014, 6:48pm
Logged
Private Message Private message
Possum
Sunday, June 22, 2014, 10:16pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh- Expluntherer... It means I'm an O...;-)
Ee Dan
Posts: 5,396
Gender: Female
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
Age: 53
Good questions san j and thanks for raising them
Incidentally I actually have particularly dreadful problems with corn fed chicken!!
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 1 - 32
ABJoe
Sunday, June 22, 2014, 11:57pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

34% Nomad
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 8,159
Gender: Male
Location: Orange County, CA, USA
Age: 51
Eat Right 4 Your Type
Type O
- Page 54 shows corn interferes with insulin efficiency and slows metabolic rate...  
- Pg. 67 - Corn lectins affect production of insulin, often leading to diabetes and obesity.  All type Os should avoid corn - especially if you have a weight problem or family history of diabetes.

Type B:
- Page 147 shows corn inhibits insulin efficiency and hampers metabolic rate...
- Page 156 Corn and buckwheat are major factors in Type B weight gain.  More than any other food, they contribute to a sluggish metabolism, insulin irregularity, fluid retention, and fatigue.

Type AB:
- Page 188 shows corn inhibits insulin efficiency.
- Pages 196, 197, 198, and 200 all say avoid corn (or corn and buckwheat) but provides no additional information about why, although on 200 it says "Like Type B", so you can refer to Type B text on pg. 156...


Live Right 4 Your Type
Type A:
- Page 206 - In particular, non-secretors should watch their consumption of wheat and corn, whose lectins can exert an insulinlike effect, lowering active tissue mass and increasing total body fat.


I also remember discussion about American Indian burial mound research indicating that bones contained less calcium after corn (maize) was introduced than before, although I don't remember where it was.

Genotype/SWAMI question:
I do NOT think anything in the Genotype Diet invalidates the information in Typebase.  Just because an item has a black dot rating does not mean an individual can eat it uninhibited.  It is still a toxin that requires each individual to monitor their reaction and to be more strict about avoiding the item in case their body is affected more than someone else's.
These diets put more obligation on the follower to be honest with themselves about what is really working for them and what isn't...

My SWAMI output puts all corn (and chicken) items in total avoid status as I have experienced that they must remain...


RH-, ISTJ
Wonderful Wife = A+ Teacher; Darling Daughter = A- SWAMI Explorer

Revision History (1 edits)
ABJoe  -  Monday, June 23, 2014, 12:43am
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 2 - 32
gulfcoastguy
Monday, June 23, 2014, 12:12am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

B to Bnonnie to Nomad, the journey continues
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 2,433
Gender: Male
Location: Ocean Springs, MS
Age: 54
Well I can tell you that if I eat it my joints hurt and I get fat.
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 3 - 32
san j
Monday, June 23, 2014, 5:29pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,301
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
I wasn't anticipating this when I posted the Question, but:
It would seem we in the late 20th- early 21st century West are demanding quite a bit more of our food than our species historically has.

Of course this is due to scientific knowledge. But one wonders whether those maize-mastering indigenous peoples of the Americas (who, as the TypeBase quote admits, used every part of the corn plant and did not shun its use for finding it causing any great sicknesses) were any less well-adjusted or kind or happy or enlightened or healthy than are moderns who "know more" about the cobs that show up at our supermarkets.

Corn was, it would seem, as well integrated into the fabric of their life and culture as was the camel to the Bedouin. But whereas one doesn't read any camel-invalidating literature, one does come across the "Corn Is Toxic For All Os" belief within the dadamo universe - having nothing to do with "Genetic Modification" -  a belief not currently substantiated by History and Anthropology.

Kin'a makes me, anyway, wonder.
As usual, posing the Meta-questions...


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004

Revision History (1 edits)
san j  -  Monday, June 23, 2014, 6:26pm
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 4 - 32
ABJoe
Monday, June 23, 2014, 5:54pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

34% Nomad
Sun Beh Nim
Moderator
Posts: 8,159
Gender: Male
Location: Orange County, CA, USA
Age: 51
I think many more people are focused on "Why?" the human body develops disease and "How?" to heal or, better yet, prevent said diseases.  This is what Dr. D'Adamo is providing us - the ability to push back the onset of many of these diseases, based on specific characteristics that have been studies and quantified.


RH-, ISTJ
Wonderful Wife = A+ Teacher; Darling Daughter = A- SWAMI Explorer
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 5 - 32
deblynn3
Monday, June 23, 2014, 6:01pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT2 Gatherer rh+;Prop-Taster
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,481
Gender: Female
Location: Arkansas
Age: 57
My two cents, foods just aren't what they use to be even not counting GMOs etc. and people eat so much of it as well. D'Adamo says for most people 80% compliance is good. The native American's of today are amount those with raising number of diabetics, weight issues and all the problems that come with it. I also remember the info on bones and American natives. That has run true for my family on the AN side.



Swami, 100% me..
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 6 - 32
san j
Monday, June 23, 2014, 6:26pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,301
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from deblynn3
The native American's of today are amount those with raising number of diabetics, weight issues and all the problems that come with it.

This is what happened to native Americans after their integrated culture was destroyed and they became subject to processed sugar and spirits. This is not because of the centrality of Corn in their (lost) culture.


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 7 - 32
san j
Monday, June 23, 2014, 6:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,301
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from ABJoe
I think many more people are focused on "Why?" the human body develops disease and "How?" to heal or, better yet, prevent said diseases.  This is what Dr. D'Adamo is providing us - the ability to push back the onset of many of these diseases, based on specific characteristics that have been studies and quantified.

Re; That "Focus":
In becoming scientifically sophisticated, longer-lived, less personally subject to decimating plagues and constant wars, are (post)modern humans bored? Has our historic mental leisure, combined with Cultural Rootlessness, bred the notion of Immortality via Diet, or (more broadly) Science? And: Can this disengaged ethos be construed Health, or Hubris?

Just wondering how, if we could travel back to him in a Time Machine, a Native American sage of a couple of centuries ago would have addressed this. Would he gamble his very culture for four or five years' POSSIBLE increased personal longevity?

This is a meta-question for the cerebral. For most here, it is not of interest, I grant you. But if you ponder History in grand swaths, if you meditate upon epochal changes as do I, chime in!  
If not, Carry On.  


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 8 - 32
ruthiegirl
Monday, June 23, 2014, 8:50pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI O+ Gatherer, Healing from Fibromyalgia
Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 12,124
Gender: Female
Location: New York
Age: 42
One of the arguments for a "Paleo" diet is that humans' health declined after the introduction of grains to their diets. They look at fossil evidence (how many missing teeth, the presence or absence of arthritis in major joints, etc.) I'm fairly certain that one of the source materials was the Native Americans before and after corn was introduced.

Nearly all Native American tribes have a "creation myth" regarding the introduction of corn; all agree they were hunter-gatherers up until a time of crisis; there was a famine and the People would have starved on their hunter/gatherer diets but then some supernatural force introduced them to corn. The exact details of this supernatural force or personna varies from one tribe to another.

Then fossil evidence shows an increase in diseases after the time corn was introduced to the Native American diets. I think that may have included a shortened lifespan. Certainly, it's better than having whole tribes starve to death. The corn they ate back then was possibly "less toxic" than the forms available now, but it still wasn't a good thing in terms of overall health. Had quinoa been available at that time in history, rather than corn, the Native Americans as a whole may have been significantly healthier. But that's not what happened. Perhaps quinoa would have been hybridized to the point of toxicity if that had been the case!

So, in a nutshell, the Native Americans introduced corn to their diets to avoid mass starvation, and then there WAS a slow decline in health as a result. The effects may have been subtle, but they were still there.

You could ask similar questions about coconuts in southern Asia and Island communities. It's there, people eat it to avoid starvation, and it became part of the culture. But that does not automatically mean that it's a particularly healthy food for anybody to be eating.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 9 - 32
Lloyd
Monday, June 23, 2014, 11:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1 (Hunter)
Sa Bon Nim
Administrator
Posts: 7,227
I've missed most of this thread.

Two points:

The corn that American Indians used prior to the arrival of Columbus, et al, was not the highly hybridized corn (much less GMO) of today. Different nutritional profile and so on.

And, the corn evaluated for the diets is the hybridized corn commonly found today, not the corn that Indians were eating when the pilgrims arrived at Plymouth Rock.

Use that information how you will.
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 10 - 32
san j
Monday, June 23, 2014, 11:23pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,301
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from Lloyd
I've missed most of this thread.

...The corn that American Indians used prior to the arrival of Columbus, et al, was not the highly hybridized corn... of today. Different nutritional profile and so on.

And, the corn evaluated for the diets is the hybridized corn commonly found today, not the corn that Indians were eating when the pilgrims arrived at Plymouth Rock.

Hmm. You're invalidating ruthiegirl's contribution, here, making the sickening of Indians via the "former" corn even less relevant.

Dadamo TypeBase extols corn as "a gift the Indians gave the world". If that gift didn't sicken type A secretor Europeans as compared with type O Europeans and Americans, then ruthiegirl's post matters a great deal to Bloodtype Science. Until I see evidence of that, I'll stick with Dr. D'Adamo's more lab-based modern evidence, which is what my OP requests, though you admit you "missed most of this thread".  

But, again, I'm pondering the phenomenon of individuals' assigning primacy to their own numeric longevity, over and above other more communal values, such as culture...
Too Big a Question, especially if one "misses" the thread!  


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 11 - 32
Lloyd
Monday, June 23, 2014, 11:31pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1 (Hunter)
Sa Bon Nim
Administrator
Posts: 7,227
Quoted from san j
.

Dadamo TypeBase extols corn as "....."


Blurbs were taken from other sources. It is well known that some of the blurbs are not entirely appropriate for the food item.

I think the blurbs should be used for general informational value and not use them as a part of the diet or Peter's work.

One last point being that the process of writing books and assembling websites has left a trail of items that can be interpreted or misinterpreted many ways. Some things were written for general low level consumption rather than for scientific scrutiny. It's a bit of a mess.
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 12 - 32
Possum
Monday, June 23, 2014, 11:47pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh- Expluntherer... It means I'm an O...;-)
Ee Dan
Posts: 5,396
Gender: Female
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
Age: 53
I remember being fascinated and reading a bit on this subject - Apparently: The decline in health of the Native Americans was due to Pellagra which is a vitamin deficiency disease...and is common...in Native American cultures that grow corn...
Pellagra - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pellagra
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 13 - 32
san j
Monday, June 23, 2014, 11:50pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,301
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from ruthiegirl
Then fossil evidence shows an increase in diseases after the time corn was introduced to the Native American diets. I think that may have included a shortened lifespan. Certainly, it's better than having whole tribes starve to death. The corn they ate back then was possibly "less toxic" than the forms available now, but it still wasn't a good thing in terms of overall health. Had quinoa been available at that time in history, rather than corn, the Native Americans as a whole may have been significantly healthier. But that's not what happened. Perhaps quinoa would have been hybridized to the point of toxicity if that had been the case!

So, in a nutshell, the Native Americans introduced corn to their diets to avoid mass starvation, and then there WAS a slow decline in health as a result. The effects may have been subtle, but they were still there.

Hi, ruthiegirl.
I've been surfing around a little, and I've found a reference to a decline in the health of Indians who ceased their hunter-gatherer ways and began to live in villages and cultivate numerous crops such as beans, squashes and grains. The cultivation of corn was not something that happened at some other, isolated time; that would have rendered Corn more "blameable", but it looks like it's not what happened.
I can see Type O hunters declining in health as they increasingly depended on a carbohydrate-heavy diet for their nutrition, and upon the village lifestyle rather than that of hunters, interfering with their need for that sort and rhythm of strenuous exercise.
The difference between concomitance and causality is crucial here, with respect to Corn.
So, addressing your (more than my own) question: To blame the demise in Indians' health upon corn is not something I'm prepared to do. My brief internet search turned up no supportive historic data, but I don't mind including it on this thread, should you find any.  


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 14 - 32
Mrs T O+
Tuesday, June 24, 2014, 1:24am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Concealed Carry Gatherer! SWAMI Explorer Blend
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 3,187
Gender: Female
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Remember that in the " old days" most food was eaten In season. Maybe if it was eaten when harvested & a little into the winter through flour, etc., it might not have been so harmful. Do we know how it was used?  It might have been used all year, but maybe it was intended to be eaten during a certain season, like harvest for lots of extra energy to work.
I know too much is not good for me. I avoid it, but last year it was served to me in a restaurant ( not listed in the description of the order) & I ate it after not having any (except a few stray kernels in mixed veggies) for a few years & felt no ill effects. I still avoid it & don't consider it a vegetable, but the grain it is. Too bad we Midwesterners consider it a vegetable, which frustrates me.


Interested in nutrition, lactation, religion, politics; love to be around people; talkative, sensitive, goofy; a "fishy Christian" ><>; left-handed; lived on a farm, small town & big city; love BTD/GTD; A staunch La Leche League veteran; b. 10/1947 Check BTD/GTD on facebook!
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 15 - 32
san j
Tuesday, June 24, 2014, 2:04am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,301
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from Possum
I remember being fascinated and reading a bit on this subject - Apparently: The decline in health of the Native Americans was due to Pellagra which is a vitamin deficiency disease...and is common...in Native American cultures that grow corn...
Pellagra - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pellagra

Pellagra was prevented, for hundreds and hundreds of years, by native Americans by treating their corn with alkali. It was the Europeans, who didn't know about such treatment, who had to discover the cause of their disease as gross niacin deficiencies.

So, Possum, you're opposing what the bloodtype books are saying, in a way. It wasn't the Indians (almost exclusively O's) who suffered from Pellagra as a result of eating corn; it was the Europeans.


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 16 - 32
Possum
Tuesday, June 24, 2014, 2:31am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh- Expluntherer... It means I'm an O...;-)
Ee Dan
Posts: 5,396
Gender: Female
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
Age: 53
Maybe that just shows you can't fully trust the internet eh, unless it is misinformation/or misinterpretation of it? I see now from further reading that you are absolutely right...
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 17 - 32
PCUK-Positive
Tuesday, June 24, 2014, 12:14pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Gatherer Rh+, NN, (lewis a+ b-) [Duffy Fy(a+b+) ]
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 4,875
Gender: Male
Location: UK
Age: 53
San J, How does Corn affect you?


Kind Regards PC. FIfHI Swami III Pro

Partner (F) is O+(Non) MN. Duffy Fy(a+b+),  Lewis (a+ b-) Gatherer.
DD ( is O+(Non)NN, Duffy Fy(a+b-) Lewis (a+b-) Gatherer
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 18 - 32
Averno
Tuesday, June 24, 2014, 12:36pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Warrior
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,044
Gender: Male
Location: Maryland
I wonder if corn becoming a staple in their diet moved a lot of other healthier foods they'd been acclimated to into the margins. Maybe what they experienced was the negative effect of the sort of dietary "evolution/revolution" that we're seeing now in the general population since the introduction of so many exotic foods (lab foods amongst them).  

As someone once said, it's the habit that harms...
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 19 - 32
Paul Hopfensperger
Wednesday, June 25, 2014, 8:58pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Dr D'Adamo IfHI Master Instructor, UK.
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 2
Gender: Male
Location: Bury St Edmunds, United Kingdom
Many years ago, I gave my father sweetcorn and he thought I had gone crazy. He is from Bavaria in Southern Germany originally and they only ever fed it to cattle - never humans. As a kid, I always remember looking at it in my stools wondering why we ate it when it never seemed to be digested correctly. I steer well clear of corn as does my family, and thank Dr. D'Adamo for confirming to me that we as humans (except A secretors) should not be eating this!


GT5: Warrior: A2 Rh +ve Non-Secretor MN Duffy a+ b-, IfHI Master Instructor
Logged Offline
Site Site Private Message Private message Reply: 20 - 32
Possum
Wednesday, June 25, 2014, 9:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh- Expluntherer... It means I'm an O...;-)
Ee Dan
Posts: 5,396
Gender: Female
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
Age: 53
Hi Paul and yes - good question!!
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 21 - 32
ruthiegirl
Thursday, June 26, 2014, 5:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI O+ Gatherer, Healing from Fibromyalgia
Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 12,124
Gender: Female
Location: New York
Age: 42
The examples I quoted were from memory; I didn't do any fresh research to back up any claims. My main point was to question the assumption that "these foods have been eaten for generations so they must be fine." It's POSSIBLE that these foods (such as corn and coconuts) are, in fact, causing health problems in the communities that have eaten them for a long time.

It's also possible that these foods were perfectly healthy when they were eaten generations ago, but only became unhealthy with modern hybridization. The difference between "ancient corn" and "modern corn" could be like the difference between spelt and wheat.

Dr D did not research any ancient grains that are no longer available today. We have no way of knowing how "ancient American corn" reacted in type O individuals 1000 years ago. If it's like spelt, then it was perfectly healthy for O secretors but problematic for O nonnies.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 22 - 32
deblynn3
Thursday, June 26, 2014, 5:44pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT2 Gatherer rh+;Prop-Taster
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,481
Gender: Female
Location: Arkansas
Age: 57
Paul, a Germany family I stayed with one summer felt the same was, they had never heard of "sweet corn" That way in the late 60's not that long ago. I rode my bike to that army base and got them some every week?   Even in these few years corn isn't what it use to be.


Swami, 100% me..
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 23 - 32
Averno
Thursday, June 26, 2014, 7:52pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Warrior
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,044
Gender: Male
Location: Maryland

Some Czech friends were horrified the we served them "pig food" a few years ago. They tried it and loved it. Roasted, buttered and salted... Oh my...   .
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 24 - 32
san j
Thursday, June 26, 2014, 8:05pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Nomadess
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 4,301
Location: San Francisco, California, USA
Quoted from Averno

Some Czech friends were horrified the we served them "pig food" a few years ago. They tried it and loved it. Roasted, buttered and salted... Oh my...   .

Don't forget the pepper!  

European countries don't have the "cornfields as far as the eye can see" agricultural allotments that we do, here in America: Corn, corn, everywhere.
Nor is "corn on the cob"  embedded in their culture as it is in ours; sweet corn on its cob says "Summer" to Americans - it's very much a part of our culture and an expected ingredient at many a summer holiday gathering or bbq.

As for the "pig-food" prejudice:
The filet of dover sole I bought last night is in my refrigerator: I suspect it's the "food" of some of my "Avoid" sea-critters, but that won't stop me from enjoying it.
I also enjoy a good lambchop; the fact that a dog would also enjoy it doesn't make it any less attractive to, or beneficial for, me.  


D'Adamo proponent since 1997
dadamo Blogger and Forum participant since 2005
Cyber-Newbie, as of 2004
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 25 - 32
Averno
Thursday, June 26, 2014, 8:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Swami Warrior
Kyosha Nim
Posts: 1,044
Gender: Male
Location: Maryland
San j  
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 26 - 32
ruthiegirl
Thursday, June 26, 2014, 9:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

SWAMI O+ Gatherer, Healing from Fibromyalgia
Kyosha Nim
Columnists and Bloggers
Posts: 12,124
Gender: Female
Location: New York
Age: 42
A good many of my meals could be divided up between "rabbit food" and "cat food" too. Food is food, and before the invention of the "pet food industry" pets simply ate family leftovers.


Ruth, Single Mother to 19yo   O- Leah , 18yo O- Hannah, and  12yo B+ Jack


Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 27 - 32
wayland B+
Sunday, June 29, 2014, 2:28pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Summer: Realization, expansion.
Posts: 94
Gender: Male
Location: Danevang, TX
Age: 38
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 28 - 32
wayland B+
Sunday, June 29, 2014, 3:59pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Summer: Realization, expansion.
Posts: 94
Gender: Male
Location: Danevang, TX
Age: 38
Logged
Private Message Private message Reply: 29 - 32
misspudding
Friday, July 4, 2014, 1:48am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Rh-, MTHFR, GT4 Explorer
Autumn: Harvest, success.
Posts: 454
Gender: Female
Location: Seattle
Age: 37
Well, I was almost entirely compliant with BTD/GTD except for corn until recently. Within the last two months, I've dropped 17 pounds without trying.




misspudding

---

Me: Celiac type gut problems; seizure disorder; MTHFR
DH: O positive
DS: O negative; "atypical" IBD - SWAMI 44% Explorer

Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 30 - 32
Seraffa
Saturday, July 5, 2014, 3:15am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

Explorer!
Ee Dan
Posts: 2,301
Gender: Female
Location: Houston, TX
Age: 49
Quoted from ruthiegirl


It's also possible that these foods were perfectly healthy when they were eaten generations ago, but only became unhealthy with modern hybridization. The difference between "ancient corn" and "modern corn" could be like the difference between spelt and wheat.



I'm an Explorer A Nonnie and can't have corn, period. BTW corn is a fruit; consider that. A carby-fruit. A wierd thing kind of like the way San J questioned Bananas a few months ago. I agree with the possiblity that corn a thousand years ago was maybe not even the "Indian Corn" we see today. I don't eat any grains anymore, PERIOD, because I will forever be a Neolith in digestion. There is one water-grass seed I do eat, nowhere related to rice at all, and that is "wild rice". It is FULL of PROTEIN. It is a treat when made with lentils (also made with protein) and tossed with buckwheat (for iron.)

I guess you could say buckwheat, breadfruit and bananas are the only  carby-fruits I can safely eat. But not corn!

Re: adding alkalai to corn to prevent pelagra - consider what the ancient Peruvians had to do with their first crops of potatoes in order to somewhat detoxify and consume them - because they were even more harmful than they are today.(I think they mixed then with potash before consuming.Gritty?) Peruvians were and still are, O's. People will try ANYTHING to make a food more digestible if they find it is filling and keeps away hunger.(though their pancreas may disagree.)


INFJ/ENFJ wings 3+4, Numerology: 1
Sun Pisc. Moon Capr. ASC Virg. N.Node Gem. S. Node Sagg.

Mortal life is a stay in a vast hospital ward.
(Eastern Orthodoxy +)

Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential. (Churchill)

SWAMI-saved from bulimia!

Revision History (1 edits)
Seraffa  -  Saturday, July 5, 2014, 3:26am
Logged Offline
Private Message Private message Reply: 31 - 32
Lola
Tuesday, July 15, 2014, 3:12am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

GT1; L (a-b-); (se); PROP-T; NN
Sa Bon Nim
Admin & Columnist
Posts: 51,070
Gender: Female
Location: ''eternal spring'' Cuernavaca - Mex.
Age: 57
yes paul,
I lived in late Czechoslovakia during the 60s

we would ride out visiting castles and would undoubtedly steal corn passing through the countryside.....all corn was for porcine feed


http://northamericanpharmacal.com/living/2013/11/ask-dr-dadamo-native-americans-and-corn/


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
DNA mt/Haplo H; Y-chrom/J2(M172);ISTJ
The harder you are on yourself, the easier life will be on you!
Logged
Private Message Private message YIM YIM Reply: 32 - 32
2 Pages 1 2 All Recommend Thread
Print Print Thread

BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  Corn: Bigger Questions

Thread Rating

There have been 1 votes for this thread.