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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  Fresh pumpkin, freshly baked.
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Fresh pumpkin, freshly baked.  This thread currently has 1,733 views. Print Print Thread
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Lloyd
Friday, September 22, 2006, 4:18am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Ah.    The price will be coming down but I couldn't resist!   Picked up a nice pumpkin the other day, baked it tonight. Yum! Fresh pumpkin is soooo different than canned. Made a great dessert even without spices or sweetner. 350o until done (varies with size and thickness of pumpkin).

Have some in the fridge for tommorow and some in the freezer for next week. Can't wait for the price to come down!  

A's and O's: Enjoy!
B secretors, sorry....  

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Friday, September 22, 2006, 7:52am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Alan_Goldenberg
Fresh pumpkin is soooo different than canned.


you are SO right Lloyd!!  The DH grows cow pumpkins every year. I'm more than a bit concerned that we may lose our crop this year as early winter may be setting in. It is supposed to warm up a bit over the next few days, so hopefully they'll be okay.
Cow pumpkin is even dif than other pumpkin. Just made a pie the other day. And yum is right!
I cut mine in half, scoop out the seeds, turn hollow side down on a baking sheet, cover w/ foil and let bake until tender. Remove from 'rind'.  Freeze in 2 C increments. Good for all winter/summer/fall.



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paulssandy
Friday, September 22, 2006, 10:49am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I am making pumpkin this weekend   I love this time of year.  Harvest and canning and baking.  This is the life  
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lstreat
Friday, September 22, 2006, 1:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Since pumpkin is bene for me and "tis the season" I guess I should start eating this veggie. But what to do with pumpkin?   I have never cooked this vegtable so maybe I will experiment with it this weekend. I would love to hear what you all do with this vegetable and what is the taste like or similiar to.

Laura  


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italybound
Friday, September 22, 2006, 2:10pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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lstreat, see me above post. cooking it in the oven is a snap. Just wash the outside, cut in half, scoop out 'guts', cut in half again, put on a baking dish ( something flat w/ slightly raised sides as this will produce liquid),  the outside of pumpkin should be facing up, cover w/ foil and bake until done. You just have to test it for this part. Scrape cooked pumpkin from 'skin', add juice as well. Blend and use.



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Alia Vo
Friday, September 22, 2006, 6:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I enjoy the fall season because it provides an assortment of fresh squashes--but fresh pumpkin is my favorite to purchase.

I usually buy the smallest baby pumpkins that will allow me to cut them with a small chef's knife.  I cut the pumpkin in one- to two-inch cubes, then saute and cover them to steam covered in water over the stove until they are soft or semi-soft.  They turn out very tender and are a great grain or starch substitute with a meal if one wants to go grainless.

I concur that fresh pumpkin has an unsurpassable taste compared to its canned counterpart.

Alia


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Lola
Friday, September 22, 2006, 7:03pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I place it whole in the oven for about an hour........
when cool, it s easier for me to cut that way! )


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Lloyd
Sunday, September 24, 2006, 1:38am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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The blender trick is nice.

I just wanted to add - I don't use it.

For me, the pumpkin is great as a squash dish. The blending is good because there are several different textures to the pumpkin meat w/ varying flavor. I happen to like this for eating. The cooked pumpkin stores almost as efficiently even without the blender magic.
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carmen
Sunday, September 24, 2006, 10:42am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Pumpkin cut into serving portions (leave skin on, bottom)on a baking tray with your roast (turkey, chicken, beef, lamb, whatever) - all perched on a rack over a little water, into the oven for at least an hour. Put sweet potato in there, carrots, turnip, etc. Lately I've used cinnamon on the pumpkin, carrot and sweet potato, dried mixed herbs on half onions and a bit of salt on all. Love the caramelised bits on top of the veg. If pumpkin skin is tough, just don't eat it but leave on to cook.
It's ok for reheating next day, but seems to lose flavour thereafter.
Steamed pumpkin is great as mash (can combine with sweet potato and/or parsnip) - add garlic chives, ghee, chilli salt etc. Plain steamed pumpkin as mentioned above is the easiest to store/freeze. Lots of soups in cold weather.
Had weeks of the sweetest chicken soup - big pieces of pumkin cook down as thickener.(Chook or turkey, carrot, onion, celery, pumpkin, sweet potato, parsnip, zucchini, parsley, whole peppercorns, veg salt, mixed dried herbs). Again leave the skins on, stops it from disintegrating too quickly. Ok to freeze too.

Much as I love pumpkin, in the last couple of years it doesn't like me as much - can't have it two days running. Pumpkin pie is on the wish list, still eating our home grown jap pumpkins from last autumn (it is spring here in oz).
)


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lstreat
Sunday, September 24, 2006, 2:56pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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So I made pumpkin for the first time yesterday. I baked it as Italy said but I have to admit, it didn't have much of a taste to it. I sprinkled evo with some sea salt but no taste really. I could've cooked it a little longer I think. With the pumpkin I also have peppercorn and butternut squash with some turnpips and roasted garlic. Now when I mashed all these together it was just wonderful with turkey and sauteed greens viola! Oh and I also made cranberries for the first time too. Love love love cranberries but I never knew what to do with them. So I bought a bag and boiled them down with 1 cup of water and some stevia and we had sweet and sour sauce! My son just loved it. It still had that tang which I love. Now that is enough to curb a sweet tooth. Thanks for all your tips everyone.  

Laura


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Lola-do you poke holes in it first before cooking it whole or just leave it like it is?  All I can think of is the baked potato (I used to eat) and how I forgot one time and it blew up in my micorwave (that I don't use anymore).   What a mess!!!

Debra


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Ah well...already cooked now.  Did put three knife holes in the top just in case.  Now I am off the make Brig's pasta dish from the other thread..

Debra

Henh...let's see how the family handles this one.


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Schluggell
Tuesday, September 26, 2006, 12:43pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from lstreat
... I guess I should start eating this veggie. But what to do with pumpkin?   I have never cooked this vegtable so maybe I will experiment ...

Once it is cooked add it to any baked goods - Pumpkin bread, Pumpkin Pancakes.
Use it as a filling for Gyoza.
It is also good in soups and stews.
You can even grill the 'Fillets'...when bound with a little starch and grated veggies makes a good 'veggieburger' or 'meatball'.

My first garden harvest I had lots of pumpkins and no money - 2 months of Pumpkin.
I actually miss it now.


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lstreat
Tuesday, September 26, 2006, 1:35pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Thanks Schluggell. What kind of flour do you use to make the Gyoza? Can I use Amarath?? Sounds like the pumpkin would work here. I have added it to my broccoli and leek soup I had for lunch yesterday, yum.  

Laura


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Lola
Tuesday, September 26, 2006, 5:04pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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I don t use the microwave for cooking.

in the oven, I do not need to poke the pumpkin.

it has worked every time.

Gyoza recipes anyone? )


''Just follow the book, don't look for magic fixes to get you off the hook. Do the work.'' Dr.D.'98
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Peppermint Twist
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Quoted from Alan_Goldenberg
Ah.    The price will be coming down but I couldn't resist!   Picked up a nice pumpkin the other day, baked it tonight. Yum! Fresh pumpkin is soooo different than canned. Made a great dessert even without spices or sweetner. 350o until done (varies with size and thickness of pumpkin). ...

Don't forgot to roast up the seeds in a little ghee or olive oil and sea salt.  Fresh roasted pumpkin seeds are one of my very favorite foods in the world.  Oh YEah, babe.



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Drea
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Tell me again how to clean the seeds and roast them up? I'm baking a pumpkin as we speak...


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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Peppermint Twist
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Well, it is kinda a pain to rinse off all the stringy stuff from 'em, but just do the best you can.  You kinda have to pull some of it off by hand and rinse the rest off as I recall (it's been a long time--too long!  October is here, YAY!).

Then, once they dry off a bit, you simply spread them on a roasting pan that you have covered with ghee or olive oil, sprinkle with sea salt (and/or other spices of your choice, but just sea salt would be the CLASSIC way to go), and roast them.  I'm trying to recall what temp and for how long.  It is just a few minutes.*  Let me find a recipe on the web.  Don't go away...

* edited to add:  WRONG.  It's apparently more like 45 minutes, shaking the pan every 5 or 10 minutes.  Kinda labor intensive, but soooooooooo worth it.  See link in post below.


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Alan_Goldenberg  -  Monday, October 16, 2006, 4:36pm
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Peppermint Twist
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Oh, Drea, I like the following, because it has pictures AND I like the suggestion to coat the seeds in the oil or ghee FIRST, then add the coated seeds to an ungreased roasting pan--I think that might be better than my method of coating the pan with the oil or ghee and adding the seeds, because each seed will have a nice coating and won't dry out, plus the salt/seasonings will stick to it, plus there might be less splatter from the pan.  Anyway, check 'er out:

http://www.recipetips.com/kitc.....ralwaysdisabled=true


"If you are on one of Dr. D's diets and it isn't joyful, you aren't doing it right." - moi

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Alan_Goldenberg  -  Monday, October 16, 2006, 4:34pm
Alan_Goldenberg  -  Monday, October 16, 2006, 4:33pm
better link with certain obnoxious pop-up thingy disabled...dang, I'm gooooooood...
Alan_Goldenberg  -  Monday, October 16, 2006, 4:32pm
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Drea
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Thanks, Twisty! Great site!


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Paulppaul
Tuesday, October 17, 2006, 2:30am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Is there a way to make a compliant pumpkin pie?  Or some kind of alternative.  
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Lola
Tuesday, October 17, 2006, 3:07am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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look in typebase...there s a recipe for sure!
tweak to your compliance.


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Paulppaul
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Perfect, Thanks.
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Drea
Tuesday, October 17, 2006, 4:12pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from Edna
Oh, Drea, I like the following, because it has pictures AND I like the suggestion to coat the seeds in the oil or ghee FIRST, then add the coated seeds to an ungreased roasting pan--I think that might be better than my method of coating the pan with the oil or ghee and adding the seeds, because each seed will have a nice coating and won't dry out, plus the salt/seasonings will stick to it, plus there might be less splatter from the pan.  Anyway, check 'er out:

http://www.recipetips.com/kitc.....ralwaysdisabled=true


I made freshly baked pumpkin seeds yesterday using ghee and salt and they were the best pumpkin seeds I've ever eaten. They were a lot of work, but since I was baking a pumpkin anyway...I just wish I hadn't eaten them all.


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ABJoe
Wednesday, October 18, 2006, 12:35am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Drea,

There are more pumpkins, no?  Glad you enjoyed them!


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Okay, that's what I need right now:  fresh-roasted pumpkin seeds!  That's the ticket!  I'm going to get a pumpkin this week and cook some in nustove!  The handyman FINALLY showed up yesterday and finished the kitchen, so I am going to CELEBRATE by roasting up some pumpkin seeds!  Can't think of a more spendid use for the new oven!  ...'Course, right now it is in the middle of the kitchen, but I shall push it back into place tonight after I remove a piece of duct tape from a newly-glued/grouted/whatevered-into-place trim tile on the wall (don't ask, but it's all good!).


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Drea
Wednesday, October 18, 2006, 3:27pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Quoted from ABJoe
Drea,

There are more pumpkins, no?  Glad you enjoyed them!


There are indeed! Unfortunately, I want to use up the pumpkin insides that I have in the freezer before baking up another one. Plus, I'll have to venture down the hill (it snowed over 6" last night); and the roads, I'm told, are still as slippery as 'boogars'.



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italybound
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Quoted from Lloyd
- The cooked pumpkin stores almost as efficiently even without the blender magic.


I only blend it when I’m making pie.  

Quoted from Lstreat
- I baked it as Italy said but I have to admit, it didn't have much of a taste to it.


Starting out (not that we ever know if we really are ) w/ a good pumpkin makes all the dif. Cooking it a bit longer would’ve prob helped as well. There is just nothing like a homegrown one. We grow cow pumpkins. They’re even better! IMHO  

Debra, how did the family like your pumpkin pasta dish?

Drea, word of caution (if you haven't already make your p/seeds) when baking the pumpkin seeds, keep a close eye on them. They can go from not done, to burnt in short order.   that was my experience last year. Very sad Italy last year.  

Quoted from drea
the roads, I'm told, are still as slippery as 'boogars'. .






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Diann
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Love all the ideas for pumpkin.  I am definitely going to purchase some this weekend and do some experimenting in the kitchen.  The roast pumpkin seeds sound great and both my hubby and I can enjoy those!!   I will also saute some fresh pumpkin and give that a try.  This is a new food for me.  The only way I've ever eaten pumpkin was in a pie and I DO love pumpkin pie!!

Thanks for sharing all your ideas on pumpkin.
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I was just thinking of making this thread "sticky" but then I noticed something:  I think it really belongs in the Cook Right forum, don't you guys?  If any mods/admins are reading this, mull that one over and, if you feel like moving it to Cook Right, go for it.  I shall hold off on any stickifying until we know which forum it will be in.  Tanx!


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italybound
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I second sticky-fying it. whatever forum in which it belongs.



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Alia Vo
Tuesday, September 11, 2007, 1:53am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Fresh, organic pie umpkin are already available in the hfs's here.

An alternative to baking pumpkin is to sautee or steam them on the stovetop; they cook much faster.  They have a different flavor and texture than baked pumpkin.

Baked pumpkin lends a starchier and flakier end product.  Conversely, steamed pumpkin is much softer and light.

Alia


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Lloyd
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I seem to remember my mom steaming the Jack-o-Lanterns after Halloween with raisins. I guess dried figs would work pretty well too.

There are definitley pumpkins in the stores now. The Wal-Mart has the cheapest prices, but the pumpkins seem not so good. There are some local grown varieties at one of the stores that look good. Not organic, not heirloom but still look nice.

Gonna pick one up somewhere later this week!
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susanh
Tuesday, September 11, 2007, 11:44am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Pumpkins are one of the easiest vegetables to grow yourself - you just need a bit of space. And if you harvest them at the right time and store properly, they will last for ages. Of course, being a B, I don't eat them now but they were one of the mainstays for us when I was a kid, growing up in a family with not much money. We had them baked, steamed, mashed, and in pumpkin scones and pumpkin fruitcake.
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I LOVE fresh pumpkin! My housemate K makes the best pumpkin soup ever. She throws in peeled, cubed roasted pumpkin (brush the cubes beforehand with olive oil and roast in a moderate oven till browned), carrots, parsnips/turnips/etc, apples, onions, garlic and fresh ginger, and cooks everything till soft. Then she mashes some of the vegetables, sets them aside, and blends up the rest with some milk (she often uses almond milk because it lends a nice flavor, but sometimes she sneaks in a little heavy cream). She then adds in the mashed veggies to give the soup some texture and lets it simmer very gently for a few minutes to blend the flavors, and serves it up with a little dish of grated pecorino to sprinkle on top. This soup is even better the next day--if there's any left! If you want to add some protein, brown up some lamb or turkey sausage, chop it in small pieces and add the sausage and some of the pan drippings to the soup. Heaven! It's absolutely delicious on a cold blustery rainy fall (or spring) day. We often make this recipe in our slow cooker and let me tell you, coming home to that wonderful aroma after a long day at work is one of the world's true delights.

And I second my twin's suggestion--roast up those pepitas and enjoy! Pumpkin seeds are awesome. I roast mine in a skillet and add wheat-free tamari and cayenne for a spicy treat.


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Drea
Tuesday, September 11, 2007, 4:25pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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Yum, Yum, and more Yum. Thanks for the recipes, Brig!


It is not my responsibility to convince anyone of anything.
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Brighid45
Tuesday, September 11, 2007, 8:06pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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You're welcome Drea. If you make the soup, you might want to add just a touch of fresh grated ginger a few minutes before serving, as ginger's spiciness tends to dissipate over long cooking times. That little kick of fresh ginger gives this soup a fantastic flavor. It is delicate, rich and full of health. We usually add browned chopped hot turkey sausage, but any favorite sausage should work pretty well.


Everyone is entitled to his or her informed opinion. --H. Ellison
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susanh
Tuesday, September 11, 2007, 10:33pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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Nutmeg is also lovely in pumpkin soup - though not for O secretors.
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diffy
Sunday, September 16, 2007, 6:52am Report to Moderator Report to Moderator
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I love the taste of butternut squash cooked in the same pot as meat/chicken. The squash absorbs the meat juice and it's yum... I guess pumpkin would be just as yum! Haven't tried it yet, but sure will sometime soon....
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Lola
Sunday, September 16, 2007, 4:19pm Report to Moderator Report to Moderator

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you won t be sorry! lol


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BTD Forums    Diet and Nutrition    Eat Right 4 Your Type  ›  Fresh pumpkin, freshly baked.

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