TypeBase Blood Type Diet Values: beef/ organic/ grass-fed
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TYPEBASE4 INDEX >> MEAT >>




BEEF/ ORGANIC/ GRASS-FED



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SCIENTIFIC NAME: BOS TAURUS

FRANCAIS: BOEUF







General Description:

Beef, the meat of an adult (over 1 year) bovine, wasn't always as popular as it is today. America has had cattle since the mid-1500s, but most immigrants preferred either pork or chicken. Shortages of those two meats during the Civil War, however, suddenly made beef attractive and very much in demand. Today's beef comes from cows (females that have borne at least one calf), steers (males castrated when very young), heifers (females that have never borne a calf) and bulls under 2 years old. Baby beef is the lean, tender but not too flavorful meat of a 7- to 10-month-old calf. Meat packers can request and pay for their meat to be graded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The grading is based on three factors: conformation (the proportion of meat to bone), finish (proportion of fat to lean) and overall quality. Beginning with the best quality, the eight USDA grades for beef are Prime, Choice, Select, Standard, Commercial, Utility, Cutter and Canner. The meat's grade is stamped within a purple shield (a harmless vegetable dye is used for the ink) at regular intervals on the outside of each carcass. USDA Prime and the last three grades are rarely seen in retail outlets. Prime is usually reserved for fine restaurants and specialty butcher shops; the lower-quality grades are generally only used for sausages and in cured and canned meats. Ideally, beef is at its best - both in flavor and texture - at 18 to 24 months. The meat at that age is an even rosy-red color. If the animal is over 2 1/2 years old it is usually classified as "well-matured beef" and, though more full-flavored, the meat begins to toughen and darken to a purplish red. Slow, moist-heat cooking, however, will make it perfectly delicious. To store fresh beef: If the meat will be cooked within 6 hours of purchase, it may be left in its plastic-wrapped package. Otherwise, remove the packaging and either store unwrapped in the refrigerator's meat compartment or wrap loosely with waxed paper and keep in the coldest part of the refrigerator for up to 2 days for GROUND BEEF, 3 days for other cuts. The object is to let the air circulate and keep the meat's surface somewhat dry, thereby inhibiting rapid bacterial growth. Cooked meat should be wrapped airtight and stored in the refrigerator. Ground beef can be frozen, wrapped airtight, for up to 3 months, solid cuts up to 6 months. Always try to use free-range, antibiotic-free sources for your meats. It's more expensive, but worth the investment. Better yet,look for sources of grass-fed beef: It's leaner and contains more conjugated linolenic acid (CLA) than commerical meat sources.


NUTRIENT NOTES:

Serving Size Analyzed: 1/4 pound



< (145)



GRAPH 1 (ABOVE). Total Calories (145) as part of a 2200 calorie daily dietary intake.

Protein (17.85 grams per 1/4 pound )
Fat (7.656 grams per 1/4 pound )
Carbohydrate (0 grams per 1/4 pound )


CHART 1 (ABOVE). Macronutrient Breakdown By Percentage.


Polyunsatured (0.234 grams per 1/4 pound )
Monounsatured (3.522 grams per 1/4 pound )
Saturated (2.736 grams per 1/4 pound )




CHART 2 (ABOVE).Fat Breakdown By Percentage.




GRAPH 2 (ABOVE). Micronutrient breakdown as percentage of Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA). Serving size: 1/4 pound .


BLOOD TYPE DIET VALUES

Follow Secretor value if you do not know your secretor status.

TYPE A:
Secretor:
AVOID: Secretory insufficiency. Induces dysbiosis. Increases polyamine or indican levels. Inhibits proper gastric function or blocks assimilation.

Non Secretor:
AVOID: Secretory insufficiency. Induces dysbiosis. Increases polyamine or indican levels. Inhibits proper gastric function or blocks assimilation.


    TYPE B:
    Secretor:
    NEUTRAL

    Non Secretor:
    NEUTRAL


      TYPE AB:
      Secretor:
      AVOID: Contains component which can modify known disease susceptibility.

      Non Secretor:
      AVOID: Contains component which can modify known disease susceptibility.


        TYPE O:
        Secretor:
        BENEFICIAL: Provides high quality protein. Increases lean muscle mass.

        Non Secretor:
        BENEFICIAL: Provides high quality protein. Increases lean muscle mass.
        • This food is Cancer SUPERBENEFICIAL for Type O
        • This food is Diabetes SUPERBENEFICIAL for Type O

        Introductory Food: Type O children should have this solid food introduced at about between 9 and 12 months of age. (Eat Right 4 Your Baby)



        LECTIN CHARACTERIZATION:

        • No data on this food.


        RECIPES FEATURING THIS FOOD:
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        SPECIAL NOTE:
        • This food can be a significant source of zinc (4.134 mgs per 1/4 pound .)

        GENETIC MODIFICATIONNo data on this food.
        PESTICIDESNo data on this food.
        CONTAMINATIONNo data on this food.
        IRRADIATIONNo data on this food.
        ANTIOXIDANTSNo data on this food.
        ALLERGENSNo data on this food.
        GLYCEMIC INDEXNo data on this food.


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