TypeBase Blood Type Diet Values: endive
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TYPEBASE4 INDEX >> VEGETABLE >>




ENDIVE



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SCIENTIFIC NAME: CICHORUM ENDIVIA






General Description:

Endive is closely related to and often confused with its cousin, CHICORY. They're both part of the same botanical family, Cichorium. There are three main varieties of endive: Belgian endive, curly endive and escarole. Belgian endive, also known as French endive and witloof (white leaf), is a small (about 6-inch-long), cigar-shaped head of cream-colored, tightly packed, slightly bitter leaves. It's grown in complete darkness to prevent it from turning green, using a labor-intensive growing technique known as BLANCHING. Belgian endive is available from September through May, with a peak season from November through April. Buy crisp, firmly packed heads with pale, yellow-green tips. Belgian endives become bitter when exposed to light. They should be refrigerated, wrapped in a paper towel inside a plastic bag, for no more than a day. They can be served cold as part of a salad, or cooked by braising or baking. Curly endive, often mistakenly called chicory in the United States, grows in loose heads of lacy, green-rimmed outer leaves that curl at the tips. The off-white center leaves form a compact heart. The leaves of the curly endive have a prickly texture and slightly bitter taste. Escarole has broad, slightly curved, pale green leaves with a milder flavor than either Belgian or curly endive. Both curly endive and escarole are available year-round, with the peak season from June through October. They should be selected for their fresh, crisp texture; avoid heads with discoloration or insect damage. Store curly endive and escarole, tightly wrapped, in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. They're both used mainly in salads, but can also be briefly cooked and eaten as a vegetable or in soups.


NUTRIENT NOTES:

Serving Size Analyzed: 1 cup



< (8)



GRAPH 1 (ABOVE). Total Calories (8) as part of a 2200 calorie daily dietary intake.

Protein (0.625 grams per 1 cup )
Fat (0.1 grams per 1 cup )
Carbohydrate (1.675 grams per 1 cup )


CHART 1 (ABOVE). Macronutrient Breakdown By Percentage.




GRAPH 2 (ABOVE). Micronutrient breakdown as percentage of Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA). Serving size: 1 cup .


BLOOD TYPE DIET VALUES

Follow Secretor value if you do not know your secretor status.

TYPE A:
Secretor:
NEUTRAL

Non Secretor:
NEUTRAL


    TYPE B:
    Secretor:
    NEUTRAL

    Non Secretor:
    NEUTRAL


      TYPE AB:
      Secretor:
      NEUTRAL

      Non Secretor:
      NEUTRAL


        TYPE O:
        Secretor:
        NEUTRAL

        Non Secretor:
        NEUTRAL



          LECTIN CHARACTERIZATION:

          • No data on this food.


          RECIPES FEATURING THIS FOOD:
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          SPECIAL NOTE:
          • This food can be a significant source of folate (71 mcgs per 1 cup .)
          • This food can be a significant source of vitamin A (1025 iu per 1 cup .)

          GENETIC MODIFICATIONNo data on this food.
          PESTICIDESNo data on this food.
          CONTAMINATIONNo data on this food.
          IRRADIATIONNo data on this food.
          ANTIOXIDANTS This food is considered to be rich in antioxidant flavonoids.
          ALLERGENSNo data on this food.
          GLYCEMIC INDEX This food has a low Glycemic Index.


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