TypeBase Blood Type Diet Values: corn
GenoType Diet Recipes   ♦   Food Values   ♦   Search   ♦   Add Recipe   ♦   Recipe List   ♦   Newly Added   ♦   Help



TYPEBASE4 INDEX >> GRAIN >>




CORN



Share this information on Facebook


SCIENTIFIC NAME: ZEA MAYS

FRANCAIS: MAS







General Description:

Throughout Europe, "corn" has always been the generic name for any of the cereal grains; Europeans call corn maize , a derivative of the early American Indian word mahiz. In fact, before settlers came to the New World Europeans had never seen this food - called Indian corn by colonists. What a wonderfully versatile and useful gift the Indians gave the world. Everything on the corn plant can be used: the husks for TAMALES, the silk for medicinal tea, the kernels for food and the stalks for fodder. Corn is not only a popular food, but the foundation of many by-products including BOURBON, CORN FLOUR, CORNMEAL, CORN OIL, CORNSTARCH, CORN SYRUP, CORN WHISKEY and laundry starch. The multicolored Indian corn - used today mainly for decoration - has red, blue, brown and purple kernels. Horticulturists developed the two most popular varieties today - white (Country Gentleman) and yellow (Golden Bantam) corn. Yellow corn has larger, fuller-flavored kernels; white corn kernels are smaller and sweeter. The hybrid butter and sugar corn produces ears of yellow and white kernels. The peak season for fresh corn is May through September. As soon as it's picked, the corn's sugar immediately begins its gradual conversion to starch which, in turn, lessens the corn's natural sweetness. Therefore, it's important to buy corn as soon after it's picked as possible. Look for ears with bright green, snugly fitting husks and golden brown silk. The kernels should be plump and milky, and come all the way to the ear's tip; the rows should be tightly spaced. Fresh corn should be cooked and served the day it's purchased, but it can be refrigerated up to a day. Strip off the husks and silk just before cooking. Corn can also be purchased canned or frozen. Tiny baby corn, particularly popular with Thai and Chinese cooks, can be purchased in cans or jars. Unfortunately, its flavor bears little resemblance to the fresh (or even frozen) vegetable. HOMINY is specially processed kernels of corn.


NUTRIENT NOTES:

Serving Size Analyzed: 1 cup



< (132)



GRAPH 1 (ABOVE). Total Calories (132) as part of a 2200 calorie daily dietary intake.

Protein (4.9588 grams per 1 cup )
Fat (1.8172 grams per 1 cup )
Carbohydrate (29.2908 grams per 1 cup )


CHART 1 (ABOVE). Macronutrient Breakdown By Percentage.




GRAPH 2 (ABOVE). Micronutrient breakdown as percentage of Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA). Serving size: 1 cup .


BLOOD TYPE DIET VALUES

Follow Secretor value if you do not know your secretor status.

TYPE A:
Secretor:
NEUTRAL

Non Secretor:
AVOID

    Introductory Food: Type A children should have this solid food introduced at about between 9 and 12 months of age. (Eat Right 4 Your Baby)


    TYPE B:
    Secretor:
    AVOID: Contains lectin or other agglutinin.

    Non Secretor:
    AVOID: Contains lectin or other agglutinin.


      TYPE AB:
      Secretor:
      AVOID: Contains lectin or other agglutinin.

      Non Secretor:
      AVOID: Contains lectin or other agglutinin.


        TYPE O:
        Secretor:
        AVOID: Contains lectin or other agglutinin. Metabolic inhibitor. Contains component which can modify known disease susceptibility.

        Non Secretor:
        AVOID: Contains lectin or other agglutinin. Metabolic inhibitor. Contains component which can modify known disease susceptibility.



          LECTIN CHARACTERIZATION:
          • This food contains a reported lectin.

          • This food contains a reported lectin.


          RECIPES FEATURING THIS FOOD:
          This ingredient is featured in the following website recipes:

          Most recent recipes added to the website:
          Search the Recipe Database


          List All Recipes


          SPECIAL NOTE:
          • This food can be a significant source of folate (70.532 mcgs per 1 cup .)
          • This food can be a significant source of potassium (415.8 mgs per 1 cup .)

          GENETIC MODIFICATION This food is commonly genetically modified [Insect/ Herbicide resistance/ Detoxification of mycotoxins]. Search out Non-GMO alternatives. (Source: foodnews.org)
          PESTICIDESNo data on this food.
          CONTAMINATIONNo data on this food.
          IRRADIATIONNo data on this food.
          ANTIOXIDANTSNo data on this food.
          ALLERGENS This grain does not contain gluten.
          GLYCEMIC INDEX This food has a high Glycemic Index.


          Program and data copyright 1997-2011 Peter D'Adamo.


          The statements made on our websites have not been evaluated by the FDA (U.S. Food & Drug Administration).
          Our products and services are not intended to diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. If a condition persists, please contact your physician.
          Copyright © 2014, Hoop-A-Joop, LLC, Inc. All Rights Reserved