Book Review : Live Right For Your Type

by Peter D'Adamo
reviewed by Amy Louise Ralston, MBAcC, BA, LicAc, cert ZB


Peter D'Adamo's latest book is another welcome addition to the endless stream of books telling a frustrated, confused and dispirited public how to magically transform their lives with yet another, dare I mention the "D" word : diet.

Before you shake your head and cringe, imagine an approach that is based on years of orthodox medical and alternative medical research and observation, takes into consideration individual chemistry, is flexible, and is held together with an unwavering attitude of common sense. Add in specific prescriptive advice for major health challenges, and youšve got a very interesting option to traditional dieting to explore.

The connection between blood group and diet was initially made by James D'Adamo, Peteršs father, early in his career as a naturopath. Live Right for Your Type is a very modern continuation of this work, because as Peter says, "Live Right is a child of the Internet." Collecting information via the Internet has meant better research data access, and that much more has been learned about blood group and diet, even since the publishing of Eat Right for your type in 1997. Perhaps the most interesting new data has been that of DšAdamošs readership. At www.dadamo.com one can find a Web page entitled: Blood Type Outcome Registry. Surfers are invited to share their experience with the diet in confidence; the statistics are compiled and available for perusal.

A major criticism of D'Adamošs work following the release of his first book was that it wasnšt grounded in scientific fact. Unfortunately, the references were simply left out of the first British edition! Live Right not only has a full reference section in the back, but also tells readers how they can access the full reference list of over 1500 studies on the Web site. Another problem with the diet frequently encountered is the legions of O blood group people who want to stay vegetarian, when according to the research this blood group fares better on animal protein. The answer? Simply follow the diet in as many respects as you feel comfortable with. Whatever changes you make should have some benefit, and with any luck it will be noticeable on a level of health and wellbeing.

Other new information to be found in Live Right concerns the role of secretor status in the genetic predisposition towards certain health conditions, and how we can fine tune this dietary approach accordingly. Also given is a two tier approach which provides further flexibility for those either wishing to deepen their exploration, or for people with chronic illness in need of stronger therapy.

The tool with which this father/son team have provided us is a living, evolving body of knowledge. We can participate in the project! It is a good, solid general guideline that can be used very effectively as an adjunct to most any other diet or therapy. It is always a good idea to work with an experienced therapist; however, I believe that this book is sufficiently clear for the lay person to experiment with. I invite you to be your own judge.



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