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Truth and boxes...

If you want a literary agent to take interest in your forthcoming book, or are in hopes of filling up your next workshop... you are advised to lay out your stuff in 4 steps, 7 steps, 9 steps - whatever, - but some formula. Publishers and the public thrive on tuna in a can. Reality, however, is a slippery fish, an armed dancer. It evades being an "it", for long, preferring to shape-shift before our endearing attempts to nail it down in a truth coffin.

I had the opportunity to meet with two eminent gentlemen from the "holistic health" field who might agree.

One is Dr. Peter D'Adamo, a fugue of a man, and author of "Eat Right for your Type", an increasingly popular book that makes the compelling proposition that your corporeal well-being might depend upon supping according to your blood type... As theories go, this one might be over 50% true, which is a lot in the theory game. During conversation with him, he shared his Brooklynite rendition of the convoluted evolution of the book, which he himself did not initiate. That story is a novella in itself, - a cartoon of what happens when public media meets private intelligence. In any case, his basic message still stands for your worthy review and experimentation. You're invited to check it out in the book and the website...

http://www.dadamo.com

If we boil or sauté the message down to the mundane basics, and skip, for reasons of brevity, the compelling archetypal stuff that underscores the theory, we get:

If you've A blood type, like your agrarian predecessors, - rice be good, carbos be in; if it's O in your system, - you're a hunter-gatherer and better not be sheepish about lamb on your plate, and for you, it'sa basta with pasta: finito!; B's, like their nomadic ancestors can say cheese, smile, graze on nuts; AB's, - well, lots of maybes...

The good Dr. D'Adamo has seen many philosophically-driven vegans and die-hard meatheads have their beloved points of view bite the dust, - go through the blender or meatgrinder, depending, as a compromise towards being able to get through the day clear-headed. Strict philosophies usually wind up pureed in the open marketplace of life-at-large.

Another more subtle message gleaned from our conversation (not obvious from the book), was in response to the question of how vigilantly to follow the recommended diets. It went something like this: For safe driving, we've got red and green lights... and in critical traffic conditions, it's a good idea to play by the rules... But, "who in their right mind waits out the red at 4:00 in the morning?"...

Flexibility and vigilance vary with road conditions. Obsessive: not good. The body, he said, has a lot of built in redundancies that can handle contradictions, especially in fairweather. I like this guy...



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