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The Blood Type Diet Archives Volume 3




Some references

Posted By: Peter D'Adamo
Date: March-10, 1998 at 14:02:53

In Response To: Re: The levels of alkaline phosphatase are hardcoded to the ABO type and ABH secretor locus (Peter D'Adamo)


Ann Clin Biochem 1992 May;29( Pt 3):287-291

Triglyceride fatty acid chain length influences the post prandial rise in serum intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity.

Day AP, Feher MD, Chopra R, Mayne PD

Department of Chemical Pathology, Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School, The Westminster Hospital, London, UK.

Intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IALP) activity rises following the ingestion of a fat-containing meal. Previous studies on intestinal fluid and lymph have shown that the magnitude of this response is dependent upon fatty acid chain length. To examine this relation in the serum of healthy humans, 10 subjects consumed two standardized fat meals. One meal contained predominantly long chain fatty acid triglycerides, the other contained predominantly medium chain fatty acid triglycerides. Serum IALP activity was measured in serial blood samples using a sensitive immunological assay. IALP activity was ABO blood group and secretor status dependent. The post-prandial rise in serum IALP activity was significantly greater following the long chain fatty acid meal than following the medium chain fatty acid meal. Previous observations of the fatty acid chain length dependency of the IALP response to fat ingestion, therefore, also apply in the serum of healthy humans under normal physiological conditions. Standardized fat meals provide the basis of a useful method for the investigation of the role of IALP in fat absorption.

PMID: 1610103, UI: 92303944
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Clin Chim Acta 1991 Dec 16;203(2-3):305-313

Serum levels of human alkaline phosphatase isozymes in relation to blood groups.

Domar U, Hirano K, Stigbrand T

Department of Medical Chemistry and Biophysics, University of Umea, Sweden.

By use of sensitive immunocatalytic assays, based on isozyme specific monoclonal antibodies, the activities of the three main human alkaline phosphatases were determined in serum. The activities were related to ABO blood groups and secretor phenotypes. The activity of intestinal alkaline phosphatase was found to be strongly correlated with ABO blood groups and secretor phenotypes, while neither the placenta alkaline phosphatase activity nor the tissue unspecific alkaline phosphatase activity demonstrated any dependence on blood groups or secretor phenotypes. Non-secretors, independent of ABO blood groups, demonstrated low activities of intestinal alkaline phosphatase in serum, amounting to approximately 20% of the activities in the secretor groups. Within the secretor group, the lowest activities were observed for blood group A (2.8 +/- 1.1 IU/l; mean +/- SEM) and the highest for blood groups B and O (14.1 +/- 1.1 IU/l and 19.0 +/- 2.5 IU/l, respectively). These results confirm that the activities of intestinal alkaline phosphatase in serum have to be related both to ABO blood groups and to secretor phenotypes in order to be informative in clinical contexts.

PMID: 1777990, UI: 92136597
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Indian Heart J 1989 Mar;41(2):82-85

Total serum alkaline phosphatase (SAP) and serum cholesterol in relation to secretor status and blood groups in myocardial infarction patients.

Mehta NJ, Rege DV, Kulkarni MB

The relation of total serum alkaline phosphatase and serum cholesterol in convalescing patients of myocardial infarction with secretor status and blood groups have been studied. Serum cholesterol and alkaline phosphatase levels showed significant difference in secretors (98) and nonsecretors (56) in myocardial groups. Total cholesterol and total serum alkaline phosphatase levels showed significant difference in secretors when blood groups A and O are compared. While in nonsecretors, significant values obtained in A/O, A/B for cholesterol and A/B, A/AB for alkaline phosphatase levels.

PMID: 2744802, UI: 89307369
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Clin Chim Acta 1988 Oct 14;177(2):147-155

Plasma alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes in diabetes mellitus.

Tibi L, Collier A, Patrick AW, Clarke BF, Smith AF

University Department of Clinical Chemistry, Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK.

Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) isoenzymes were measured in type 1 diabetics, type 2 diabetics and in a non-diabetic control group. Within the diabetics and the control group, intestinal ALP activity was significantly higher in BO secretors than A secretors or ABO non-secretors. There was no difference in intestinal ALP activity between type 1 and type 2 diabetics but the diabetics had a significantly higher activity of this isoenzyme than the corresponding blood group/secretor status category of the control group. Liver ALP was significantly higher in the diabetics compared with the control group. Bone ALP showed no significant difference between the diabetics and the control group.

PMID: 3233764, UI: 89168775



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