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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Salmon Question
Posted by: slk7387, Monday, July 7, 2014, 8:37pm
Why is salmon now a neutral when it was once a beneficial (or so I thought).

Does anyone see the benefit of sockeye vs atlantic?  
Posted by: Averno, Monday, July 7, 2014, 8:52pm; Reply: 1
Hi slk, Atlantic refers to a species of salmon. It is most often the farmed variety. Sockeye is (I believe) always wildcaught. Salmon go through particular changes in their physiology as they mature, and farming denies them these changes. The result is that the greatest benefits of eating salmon are drastically reduced. Beyond that, there are serious sanitation issues with farmed salmon, and there is much debate whether the feed is appropriate for the fish, and ultimately safe for us higher-ups on the food chain.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Monday, July 7, 2014, 8:54pm; Reply: 2
In the newer rating systems (GenoType and SWAMI).

There are different rating for different types of salmon:

Salmon, Atlantic, wild
Salmon, Chinook ◊
Salmon, Sockeye ◊

My SWAMI diet report notes:

Quoted Text
Insure that salmon purchased is not “farm raised” by rather “wild
caught”.


Atlantic Salmon in the US is nearly always farm raised.
Posted by: slk7387, Monday, July 7, 2014, 9:53pm; Reply: 3
I only buy fish that says wild-caught.
Posted by: slk7387, Monday, July 7, 2014, 9:55pm; Reply: 4
The cod I find is wild-caught but usually a product of China so I'm not sure how good that is.
Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, July 8, 2014, 2:46pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from slk7387
The cod I find is wild-caught but usually a product of China so I'm not sure how good that is.

I haven't had a problem with it so far...

Since I have to eat something, I don't want to delete possible sources unless I have a problem with it.
Posted by: san j, Thursday, July 10, 2014, 8:29am; Reply: 6
This from The NYTimes:
http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/04/10/the-bottom-line-on-salmon/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

Bottom line:
Quoted Text
Here’s the short version. If it’s wild, it’s not Atlantic. If it’s Atlantic, it’s not wild. If it’s Pacific … you gotta know your fishmonger. Never a bad idea anyway.
Posted by: Amazone I., Thursday, July 10, 2014, 8:52am; Reply: 7
all about antibiotic use in  salmon farms ??) ;)...(whistle)
Posted by: Averno, Thursday, July 10, 2014, 12:34pm; Reply: 8

Antibiotics are one issue. Also inappropriate, poor quality feed (PCB's, pesticides, with a possible link to obesity and diabetes  http://www.altmedrev.com/publications/16/4/301.pdf),  unsanitary conditions, and unnatural stresses akin to "feed lot conditions".  By denying them their spawning process, the development of desirable levels of nutrients are arrested. (Omega 3's? Would someone confirm this, I only recall an earlier discussion on the subject, not the details.)

Another serious consideration is whether farm raised escapees introduced into the wild population-often as an exotic, given the location of many fish farms- have the potential of collapsing the wild stocks.

http://www.fao.org/3/a-aj272e.pdf
Posted by: san j, Thursday, July 10, 2014, 5:07pm; Reply: 9
Not to mention that farm-raised salmon tastes yucky.
Not to worry - if you're cooking it yourself, it'll stink up the house so bad, you'll know not to eat it (built-in Warning System).
Posted by: Averno, Thursday, July 10, 2014, 5:40pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from san j
Not to mention that farm-raised salmon tastes yucky.
Not to worry - if you're cooking it yourself, it'll stink up the house so bad, you'll know not to eat it (built-in Warning System).


(funny)(clap)
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, July 10, 2014, 7:49pm; Reply: 11
Dr. D. has wild Atlantic, a neutral, on my SWAMI. I'm trying to develop a taste for sockeye, a superfood.
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, July 10, 2014, 7:52pm; Reply: 12
Can't help but wonder if the huge increase in imported fish, even catfish, has helped raise those statistics in the United States.
Posted by: Juliebug, Thursday, July 10, 2014, 7:59pm; Reply: 13
I was at Wal Mart the other day and found a type of Salmon I hadn't seen before...Wild Caught Keta from China. I bought it because I couldn't resist the price- $5.00 for 1.5 lbs. After I returned home I did some checking on Google. It is low in calories and fat, lower in omega 3 than other salmon, but seemed to have least amounts of mercury and other contaminants. I take alot of flax supplements so I wasn't worried  about it not having as much 3's. You don't cook it as long because of the lower oil content. I grilled it with some veggies and was really surprised how wonderful and mild tasting it was. I will definitely purchase it again!
Posted by: Averno, Thursday, July 10, 2014, 8:39pm; Reply: 14
Keta, AKA, chum salmon, should be fine. It's fished around Alaska, I believe. Chinese processing, however, raises a flag... though if there are no outward signs of mishandling, I'd eat it no problem.
Posted by: san j, Thursday, July 10, 2014, 9:23pm; Reply: 15
This is one of those threads that makes me grateful for living in this region... ;)
Posted by: shoulderblade, Thursday, July 10, 2014, 11:00pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from Spring
Can't help but wonder if the huge increase in imported fish, even catfish, has helped raise those statistics in the United States.


I would think considerably. I have seen numerous reports on the lack of quality food standards standards in foreign countries (esp. China) but never accompanied by numbers. I generally assume that any product imported from a 'low-standards' source is highly risky. There is almost always an alternative though likely a little pricier..

Posted by: Juliebug, Friday, July 11, 2014, 1:22pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from shoulderblade


I would think considerably. I have seen numerous reports on the lack of quality food standards standards in foreign countries (esp. China) but never accompanied by numbers. I generally assume that any product imported from a 'low-standards' source is highly risky. There is almost always an alternative though likely a little pricier..



I know about the alternative too well...I stocked up my freezer with copper river salmon a few weeks ago...$24.99 per lb.  :o We usually eat that twice a month or the wild caught scottish salmon. It is nice to have a less expen$ive option at times though. I don't have alot of options where I live. I try to go to Dallas every 4-6 weeks and stock up on fresh, good quality seafood.
Posted by: slk7387, Monday, July 14, 2014, 4:50pm; Reply: 18
My huband bought the Sokeye Salmon wild caught from Russia at Costco. I'm not sure how safe it is, but I'll start buying it from local places that have wild caught from US. Luckily, the wild caught Cod at Costco is from Alaska.
Posted by: ABJoe, Monday, July 14, 2014, 4:54pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from slk7387
My huband bought the Sokeye Salmon wild caught from Russia at Costco. I'm not sure how safe it is, but I'll start buying it from local places that have wild caught from US. Luckily, the wild caught Cod at Costco is from Alaska.

From what standpoint you are questioning the Russian salmon?
Posted by: Averno, Monday, July 14, 2014, 5:02pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from slk7387
My huband bought the Sokeye Salmon wild caught from Russia at Costco. I'm not sure how safe it is, but I'll start buying it from local places that have wild caught from US. Luckily, the wild caught Cod at Costco is from Alaska.


I eat it once per week. It seems Ok, but freshness is sometimes great, sometimes not so great. Like just about any frozen fish.

Aside from Costco's Atlantic salmon (which I wouldn't eat) they offer a few others that I've sampled, and were not impressed.

BTW: I don't trust the Russian Cod. It may be Pollock. Ok if you can have pollock, but way overpriced if it is...

Posted by: misspudding, Monday, July 14, 2014, 7:59pm; Reply: 21
I lived in Siberia (Magadan) for a summer for grad school research. It's basically the Russian version of Anchorage, Alaska.

My host's husband was a salmon fisherman and I only saw him twice during the 8 weeks I was there. We ate salmon for pretty much every single meal (ugh). I got so incredibly tired of it, I didn't eat it for 9 months after I got home! Haha. But I can vouch that it's a-okay and very much wild. The Sea of Okhotsk is some pristine water, much like the Gulf of Alaska. It's cold and there aren't many people living in that part of the world. Enjoy your wild Russian salmon!
Posted by: Patty H, Tuesday, July 15, 2014, 1:54pm; Reply: 22
I usually check as to where the fish is from and choose that way.  Wild caught fish is the only fish I will buy.
Posted by: Easy E, Tuesday, July 15, 2014, 2:54pm; Reply: 23
I could eat salmon three meals a day!  I can't remember if it is a beneficial but I like it (I don't eat it that often;)  
Posted by: slk7387, Tuesday, July 15, 2014, 8:03pm; Reply: 24
Quoted from ABJoe

From what standpoint you are questioning the Russian salmon?


I think misspudding cleared the air on Russian salmon. I wasn't sure of the process, safety, handeling, etc.
Posted by: slk7387, Tuesday, July 15, 2014, 8:04pm; Reply: 25
Quoted from Easy E
I could eat salmon three meals a day!  I can't remember if it is a beneficial but I like it (I don't eat it that often;)  


HAHA! I could eat it daily too... which is why I was wondering why it was originally beneficial then changed to neutral. It made me sad.
Posted by: misspudding, Tuesday, July 15, 2014, 8:15pm; Reply: 26
I did do a quick google search on Russian salmon, and it appears if it's been processed in China, that's where the iffy factor comes up. Obviously, the Russian salmon I was eating came direct from the source and was good. But salmon, just like beef, should say where it's been handled, right? Isn't that part of U.S. food labeling laws?

Maybe it's only the source, not the processing. Hmmm...

Well, in theory, it should be good.
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