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BTD Forums  /  The Encyclopedia/ D'Adamo Library  /  Older autistic boy
Posted by: Mrs T O+, Wednesday, June 25, 2014, 1:32pm
I was talking to the guy at the Vitamin Shoppe & he was sharing about his 11 y.o. stepson who is autistic.  He said that noise bothers him, but shared that the kid finished 5th grade & tests well in reading & math.  I feel this is good as he seems to have enough skills to function in our society.
I'm sure they have tried some vitamins as the guy works in a vitamin store!
I told him I would ask on my message board for any more help. I also am sure there are counselors & practitioners that could help & advise them what to do. The  jungle of upper grades & high school will not be helpful to this kid. I suggested nome schooling with other places helping in gym & art.  Most of the homeschoolers I know do well & avail themselves of agencies & places that round out their education.
I'm sure there might be smaller private schools that would help as well as public school programs.
Any input from you, one of the best forums on the internet?
Posted by: Adopted4, Wednesday, June 25, 2014, 4:38pm; Reply: 1
Quoted from Mrs T O+
I was talking to the guy at the Vitamin Shoppe & he was sharing about his 11 y.o. stepson who is autistic.  He said that noise bothers him, but shared that the kid finished 5th grade & tests well in reading & math.  I feel this is good as he seems to have enough skills to function in our society.
I'm sure they have tried some vitamins as the guy works in a vitamin store!
I told him I would ask on my message board for any more help. I also am sure there are counselors & practitioners that could help & advise them what to do. The  jungle of upper grades & high school will not be helpful to this kid. I suggested nome schooling with other places helping in gym & art.  Most of the homeschoolers I know do well & avail themselves of agencies & places that round out their education.
I'm sure there might be smaller private schools that would help as well as public school programs.
Any input from you, one of the best forums on the internet?


My nephew is about the same age (can't remember exactly) and is autistic. My sister home schools him (as well as all of her kids) and he has made some significant improvements over the last several years as a result. I can't tell you exactly what books/resources/curriculum she's used over the years for him, but I can find out. My nephew is doing better in social situations than he was years ago, but yes, he has triggers that can really set him off too.

Since my youngest was diagnosed with dyslexia about a year ago, a lot of the reading and research I've done has indicated that there are parallels between dyslexia and autism. Much of the specialized curriculum I teach with is supposedly beneficial for autistics as well because of the cognitive delays associated with both disabilities.

I would absolutely talk to the stepdad again as soon as possible since he will be having to make a decision between middle school or home school. There are so many resources out there to guide parents who desire to home school but aren't sure how to or if they can do it. A parent doesn't need a teaching degree to homeschool their children.

Like I said, I can give you more specifics in how I school my "special" child, or how my sister teaches her autistic son. But, I think a good start is just googling "autism and home schooling" and it will give your friend an understanding of how others home school their special needs kids.
Posted by: Goldie, Wednesday, June 25, 2014, 5:51pm; Reply: 2
Learning challenged:  

Where is this family living?  can they make changes in thinking, expectations and life style.

They Canadians are bringing a variety schools into the Us.. one currently in CT .. another is in Philadelphia..

I think as a parent we need to understand this and pull together to get this into all schools.  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SaobPkxAcJc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0td5aw1KXA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=epHBDNBPnHg OMG , WOW!!! He reminds me of you!! LOL

http://www.arrowsmithschool.org/arrowsmithprogram-background/intro-video.html
Posted by: SquarePeg, Wednesday, June 25, 2014, 6:34pm; Reply: 3
I have learned so much about "treating" autism since 2001.

Mega doses of P5P, the active coenzyme of vit. B6, along with magnesium was very helpful in my relative's case.  Specifically, Kirkman Labs' "NuThera" multi-vitamin was used, 1/4 dose.  It has been shown to be effective in a study by Dr. Bernard Rimland.  I doubt the Vitamin Shoppe has such specialized vitamins as this.

Diets that might help include Gluten-Free / Caisen Free (GFCF), and / or Feingold.

The vestibular system is "linked" to speech and auditory processing, and it turns out that motion-based activity can improve verbal communication.  If the child enjoys spinning, rocking, bouncing and other "inappropriate" or "undesirable" movements (teachers might say "he just can't sit still"), he or she is actually "self-treating" and the movements should be encouraged rather than suppressed.

Coordinated bilateral movements promote connections between the left and right sides of the brain.  This is the basis for some therapies as "Brain Gym."  An occupational therapist who specializes in ASD would incorporate these exercises into his or her program.

The Wilbarger Protocol (aka "brushing") can help with some sensory issues.  So can weighted lap blankets or vests or the application of deep pressure such as being sat upon under a couch cushion.

This is just a tiny, off-the-cuff introduction.  I recommend joining a message board devoted to ASD.
Posted by: SquarePeg, Wednesday, June 25, 2014, 6:39pm; Reply: 4
One more thought...

Does the boy have an IEP?  Or is he currently mainstreamed?  He might possess the ability to retain and recall facts, but when the material becomes more abstract (algebra, inferencing) he might hit a wall.  And even good school work is not enough to succeed if the boy cannot socialize.  In some school districts a medical DX of ASD automatically qualifies the student for an IEP.  Some schools handle this better than others, and joining the SEPTA group is a very good idea.
Posted by: Amazone I., Thursday, June 26, 2014, 6:44am; Reply: 5
Dr.Klinghardt treats autistic children with great success... I think BTD & Klinghardts' advices can be the problem solver ??) ! ;) :D... http://www.dr.klinghardtacademy.com
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, June 27, 2014, 2:01pm; Reply: 6
They need to find out what the public school can provide for him. Many kids do fine in elementary school, but then can't handle "regular" middle or high school with all the class changes, crowded hallways, etc. Schools have self-contained classrooms for those kids who need them. Sometimes it's in the same building as the rest of the grade and sometimes it's at a different facility.

I think they should research both public and home schooling (as well as any appropriate private schools that may be in the area) before making any final decisions. Homeschooling is a wonderful choice for many families, but not for all. I'm a firm believer in doing what's best for the child rather than getting locked into a philosophy. Whether or not home schooling is the best choice will depend on what the schools have to offer.
Posted by: Mrs T O+, Saturday, June 28, 2014, 8:43pm; Reply: 7
So true, Ruthie! This is a big city & there should be plenty of options. I don't know if the mother works also. Most women work here.
I'm sure there are financial considerations, too. Thanks everyone, for such good info. I hope I can pass this along OK.

Cheers, everyone!
Posted by: Goldie, Tuesday, July 1, 2014, 3:18pm; Reply: 8
some school have no choice but to pay for private schools as they are not able to provide the classes he /she needs.. Never be afraid to push the heck out of any system.. be proactive is my motto..

As for home schooling, well if he is to be home all his life then so be it, but socializing is as much of importance as are academics.   I have fewer concerns if all is being done rather than not much.. together parents can do much alone very litte.. but try we all must.. all the best..
Posted by: jayneeo, Tuesday, July 1, 2014, 7:52pm; Reply: 9
Klinghard is good, also, Dr. Amy Yasko, who has made it her mission to help families with children with autism. It's got a strong link to mthfr issues. Google her.
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