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BTD Forums  /  Live Right 4 Your Type  /  Bone broth + histamines
Posted by: narnia, Monday, April 21, 2014, 6:50pm
Hi All!  As I have been awakened to the need for bone broths, I tried making some crockpot meals and noticed that I felt tired after eating them (all compliant foods).  So, I began to research and found that long, slow-cooked foods have a high level of histamines.

I may possibly have a histamine intolerance, since I felt better when I ate freshly cooked meats.  

So, what does one do in this case, as we need to have bone broth in our diet so that we can eat the whole animal and not just the muscle meats for balanced amino acid intake?   :-/
Posted by: Lola, Monday, April 21, 2014, 7:24pm; Reply: 1
bone has no apparent meat

choose those with marrow content

oven roast before cooking on low set for 8 hours minimum
Posted by: Lin, Monday, April 21, 2014, 9:14pm; Reply: 2
Narnia,
interesting connection.
Hayfever sufferers have a histamine problem. I read in a book that taking vitamin C can help clear that issue.
I've been using crockpot to make soups, and have to say your comment resonates with me.
More recently I've been making chicken/turkey stock then immediately freezing in ice cube trays so that they'll be fresh.
Lin
Posted by: narnia, Monday, April 21, 2014, 10:15pm; Reply: 3
I read on one site that they said to cook soups no more than 4 hours...perhaps for histamine levels.  4 hours is not long enough to form the gelatinous mixture, I don't believe....so longer than 4 hours elevates histamine levels, from my research.

I don't think that it matters whether it is bone only or meat, too...I will have to research that...it was my impression that any animal product cooked for long time periods elevates histamine levels.
Posted by: narnia, Monday, April 21, 2014, 10:16pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from Lin
Narnia,
interesting connection.
Hayfever sufferers have a histamine problem. I read in a book that taking vitamin C can help clear that issue.
I've been using crockpot to make soups, and have to say your comment resonates with me.
More recently I've been making chicken/turkey stock then immediately freezing in ice cube trays so that they'll be fresh.
Lin


For how long are you cooking your stocks?  And what goes into making your stocks?

Posted by: Mrs T O+, Tuesday, April 22, 2014, 1:40pm; Reply: 5
I'm not an expert on this,but I see the value of eating certain foods in season.  In the winter when we eat more soups, we don't deal with pollen. When it warms up, we have to deal with pollen, so maybe we need to eat other things.  If we crave soup, let's eat more bean soups. If we get some soup bones on sale,we can freeze them or make the stock & freeze it for a snowy day!
Posted by: Lin, Tuesday, April 22, 2014, 3:57pm; Reply: 6
Narnia,
I've used whole chickens in the past, but have simplified to using turkey or chicken thighs with meat on  and cooking them until bones are soft. Sometimes overnight in a crockpot, or most of the day.
I just leave them until the chicken falls off the bones and the bones are very soft.
As mentioned after cooling I'll add to ice cube tray, and when I cook rice and different things I'll add a cube or two.  
Lin
Posted by: Lin, Tuesday, April 22, 2014, 4:00pm; Reply: 7
Mrs. T,  I agree with you, with an add on...
eating the soups/stock, for me it is another way of getting more nutrients, more easily absorbed.
I do agree that with the changing season the body needs more of other foods, especially those in season.
Lin
Posted by: NanJoy, Wednesday, April 23, 2014, 12:19am; Reply: 8
I have not noticed any problems with long cooked stews, soups and crockpot meals. My O husband has a lot of seasonal allergy issues, but we eat meat and bone long-cooked meals with lots of vegetables all year. More root vegetables in the winter, and more green beans in the summer. But rarely any other beans as we have only a few allowed dry beans. We use lots of fresh greens and many other vegetables and herbs. For us, these are great meals with lots of leftovers we can eat for days. Nice to have them reasy to reheat when we are hungry and tired.
Posted by: Amazone I., Tuesday, April 29, 2014, 6:25pm; Reply: 9
is it a question of histamine or better said purine??) ;) If I see by comparison that bone broth do contain up to 70 x more purines then mushrooms (fresh musrooms I'm talkin about)....so far better to take care about gout instead... ;) :D :X
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