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BTD Forums  /  Supp Right For Your Type  /  Knee/Joint Issues
Posted by: Hassanna, Tuesday, April 1, 2014, 4:56am
I'm wondering which supplements are the best for recurring meniscal issues?

I've had surgery on both my knees; ACL reconstruction on both, meniscal repairs on both, and lateral collateral repair on the right leg.  

I injured my left knee about two years ago.  Since I've had this happen twice before, I never went to the doctor, but I'm pretty sure I tore the medial meniscus....again.  Since that injury two years ago, my knee has had two "tweaks" where while I am exercising something occurs and I feel a sensation and pain in the medial meniscal area, accompanied by inflammation and swelling.

I'm just wondering if there are any type of supplements out there to help strengthen or regenerate this area?

Any help would be appreciated.
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, April 1, 2014, 5:38am; Reply: 1
bromelain
arnica
phloxicin
make bone broth
Posted by: Jane, Tuesday, April 1, 2014, 3:07pm; Reply: 2
Second what Lola said although if you need surgery, you need surgery....
I tore my ACL a few years ago.  That knee is fine.  The other knee, which was always my more troublesome knee hurts when I exercise or go up and down the stairs.  I find that the exercises for the quads help some, good posture (mine is really lousy so I have to think about it a lot) and Phloxin all help.  My knees were wrecked from years and years of skiing, tennis, flat feet, etc.  
Posted by: Hassanna, Tuesday, April 1, 2014, 6:10pm; Reply: 3
Thanks Lola and Jane!

I've currently been taking Phyloxicin and Scienca.  

I'm definitely an active individual, that's why this meniscal situation is recurring.  I've have the two knee surgeries when I was young and prefer to try a more holistic route this time around with nutrition, supplementation, and looking at what could be the underlying issue of "why" this happens.  Often it occurs during times of heightened stress.

I do understand that if surgery is needed, it's needed.  If it can be avoided in any way, I will definitely try whatever it takes first!
Posted by: Hassanna, Tuesday, April 1, 2014, 6:11pm; Reply: 4
Lola - What kind of Bone broth do you suggest?  
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, April 1, 2014, 9:32pm; Reply: 5
Hassanna,
Slow-cook bones from animals that are compliant on your type A Secretor (or Genotype or SWAMI) food list.  8 to 12 hours.  Chill and discard any fat that rises to the top.  Use daily in cooking.

One of the best things for me, with similar knee injuries, has been to consistently keep the muscles that surround and support the knees, strong.  You can get appropriate exercises on the internet, or arrange to see a Physical Therapist to learn what to do.  Without strong support, your knees are vulnerable.
Posted by: Ligia, Tuesday, April 1, 2014, 9:51pm; Reply: 6
Hi Hassanna,

I suggest you read this book:  "The Egoscue Method of Health Through Motion: Revolutionary Program That Lets You Rediscover the Body's Power to Rejuvenate It "

Pete Egoscue suggests that when the body is not aligned, you'll continue to see issues with knees, hips, etc.  So you have your knee surgery, or hip surgery, and everything is fine, but after a while, if the body is not well aligned something else will come up.

Just a thought.
Posted by: HealthSeeker, Tuesday, April 1, 2014, 10:18pm; Reply: 7
I found strickly following the way of eating resolved my menicus problem, and my knee (both) healed quickly. I've been a er4yt follower for just over a year and it has been eye opening and rejoiceful for me.
I'Ve been accused of er4yt is my only conversation.
I say "oh well, just showing my love to all I speak to.
Im a walking witness. Lol
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 12:59am; Reply: 8
good news hassana
beef has no lectin, thus beefbone broth is ok for you

no meat, just the bone broth
Posted by: Amazone I., Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 10:01am; Reply: 9
Maitake and Reishi or Pleurotus ostreatus...always add some Vit C with those yummy mushies ;) :D....or some lekker MSM or especially for an A chondroitin sulphate  :D
Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 1:43pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from Ligia
Hi Hassanna,

I suggest you read this book:  "The Egoscue Method of Health Through Motion: Revolutionary Program That Lets You Rediscover the Body's Power to Rejuvenate It "

Pete Egoscue suggests that when the body is not aligned, you'll continue to see issues with knees, hips, etc.  So you have your knee surgery, or hip surgery, and everything is fine, but after a while, if the body is not well aligned something else will come up.

Just a thought.


I second this recommendation! A fantastic book. I've given copies to many of my friends and coworkers.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Wednesday, April 2, 2014, 6:19pm; Reply: 11
Great thread.  Glucosamine sulfate helps repair cartilage, fyi.  You have to give it a few weeks to months, even, before you notice any improvement, because what it is doing is actually building cartilage.

I took it for several years and really noticed an improvement, then stopped due to fear of the "Corexit" chemical dispersant used in the BP Gulf oil disaster a few years ago.  Many of the shrimp shells used to make glucosamine sulfate supplements are sourced from the Gulf of Mexico.  Given how much time has elapsed, and how much worse my knees are since stopping the glucosamine (which may or may not be related at all to stopping...yet the fact is, they are worse), I am probably going to resume taking glucosamine sulfate in the near future.

Timely thread for me, as LONG story drastically shortened, I've just convinced my 90-year-old mom last night to go to a doctor about her knees, and also about maybe getting some physical therapy prescribed to build up her terribly, terribly weak leg muscles.  If I like this doctor (A DO, not an MD, btw), I am going to go to her myself, as, one, I have had no primary care doctor since 2010 (because I hate them all *lol* and I gave up trying to find one that I can stand) and, two, my knees are really in need of examination and SOMETHING, too.  This doc was recommended for my mom last night by a very fab human whose mom goes to her.  I have been trying to get her to go to a knee doc for years, and wouldn't have gone with a DO, but this recommendation was in a general context, as the doctor is a primary care doc, yet I would think a DO would be good to go to specifically with a knee issue, so this is good.

Anyway:  glucosamine sulfate!

(Excuse any incoherence in the above post; I'm on no sleep.)
Posted by: Hassanna, Thursday, April 3, 2014, 5:12am; Reply: 12
Ligia - Thanks for the book recommendation!  I've already ordered it.

Lola - Thanks for the info on the beef bone having no lectin!  Woo-whoo!

Amazon I - I'm not too familiar with the mushrooms, I'll have to check into those.  And I haven't taken chondroitin or glucosamine sulphates and MSM in awhile, perhaps it's time to do so again.  

Does anyone know how many mg should be consumed of glucosamine, chondroitin, or MSM?
Posted by: Spring, Friday, April 4, 2014, 1:00am; Reply: 13
Quoted from Lola
good news hassana
beef has no lectin, thus beefbone broth is ok for you
no meat, just the bone broth

Lola, is marrow soup the same as beef bone broth? Anyway, marrow soup is a neutral for me. Now, I see that "bone soup (allowable meats)" is a black dot. So what is marrow soup do you suppose and how is it different from broth?
Posted by: ABJoe, Friday, April 4, 2014, 1:21am; Reply: 14
Quoted from Spring
Lola, is marrow soup the same as beef bone broth? Anyway, marrow soup is a neutral for me. Now, I see that "bone soup (allowable meats)" is a black dot. So what is marrow soup do you suppose and how is it different from broth?

Hopefully someone will clarify, but I thought that bone broth(soup) is when the bones are left whole, but marrow soup is when the marrow bones are cracked prior to cooking and the marrow drawn out into the soup after cooking...
Posted by: Spring, Friday, April 4, 2014, 2:15am; Reply: 15
Quoted from ABJoe
Hopefully someone will clarify, but I thought that bone broth(soup) is when the bones are left whole, but marrow soup is when the marrow bones are cracked prior to cooking and the marrow drawn out into the soup after cooking...

That makes sense to me, ABJoe. Thank you!
Posted by: Hassanna, Friday, April 4, 2014, 9:15pm; Reply: 16
Would you guys recommend a supplement that contains all three glucosamine, chondroitin and MSM?  Or would you take them as three separate supplements?

Also, which brands do you all prefer?
Posted by: san j, Friday, April 4, 2014, 10:56pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from Hassanna
Would you guys recommend a supplement that contains all three glucosamine, chondroitin and MSM?  Or would you take them as three separate supplements?

Also, which brands do you all prefer?


Off the top of my head, I'm remembering that chondroitin is great for A, while it's an Avoid for O and B...

Okay, the Encyclopedia shows chondroitin as recommended for A and AB.
Glucosamine sulfate for B, N-acetyl glucosamine for O.

The arthritis book corroborates the above re: O,
it says both glucosamine sulfate and chondroitin sulfate are for A,
it says both glucosamine sulfate and MSM are for B,
and that all three can be used by AB.

Also, plenty of other supplements are named for joint disease, both in the arthritis book and in the Joint and Anti-Inflammation protocols of the Bloodtype Encyclopedia.
Posted by: Chloe, Sunday, April 6, 2014, 10:05pm; Reply: 18
I found a really great guy on youtube showing how to strengthen all the muscles surrounding the
knees.  Personally I have issues with my knees and have been finding these exercises to really be
beneficial.  Many times physical therapists do youtube videos that are superb.

I hope you find this video helpful.  I've been faithfully doing these exercises daily and can really
tell the difference.  
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hklBS5UQaw
Posted by: Victoria, Sunday, April 6, 2014, 11:55pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from Spring

Lola, is marrow soup the same as beef bone broth? Anyway, marrow soup is a neutral for me. Now, I see that "bone soup (allowable meats)" is a black dot. So what is marrow soup do you suppose and how is it different from broth?


My butcher sells marrow bones, which are long bones from the cattle's legs.  They are cut into sections .  The sections look like big tubes that are filled with solid marrow.  When the bones are slow cooked, the marrow also cooks and can be removed from the bone and eaten or used in cooking.  It's very rich.  :D

I buy beef knuckle bones, which are big joint bones from the animal, and provide collagen, cartilage, gelatin . . When these are slow cooked for hours, the resulting stock is chilled, the fat layer discarded and the remaining bone broth (stock) is usually similar to 'jello' in consistency.
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, April 17, 2014, 5:49am; Reply: 20
to my understanding, both are very nutritious.....

I wouldn t know why the difference

if black dot, do consider adding it......guess by now you are pretty reset, no? ;D
Posted by: susanC, Thursday, April 17, 2014, 5:30pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from Ligia
Hi Hassanna,

I suggest you read this book:  "The Egoscue Method of Health Through Motion: Revolutionary Program That Lets You Rediscover the Body's Power to Rejuvenate It "

Pete Egoscue suggests that when the body is not aligned, you'll continue to see issues with knees, hips, etc.  So you have your knee surgery, or hip surgery, and everything is fine, but after a while, if the body is not well aligned something else will come up.

Just a thought.


Rolfing works wonders on alignment.  I have been Rolfed for the last 12 years since my bi-lateral hip replacements and still move with relative ease.  Without the Rolfing I fear I would be stiff and in pain.  Rolfing also works to prevent the scar tissue from forming after surgery. A big plus to mobility.

Posted by: Spring, Thursday, April 17, 2014, 6:06pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from Lola
to my understanding, both are very nutritious.....
I wouldn t know why the difference
if black dot, do consider adding it......guess by now you are pretty reset, no? ;D

I think I am, Lola, but my mindset about black dot avoids is hard to get around! :)
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, April 17, 2014, 6:12pm; Reply: 23
Quoted from Victoria
My butcher sells marrow bones, which are long bones from the cattle's legs.  They are cut into sections .  The sections look like big tubes that are filled with solid marrow.  When the bones are slow cooked, the marrow also cooks and can be removed from the bone and eaten or used in cooking.  It's very rich.  :D

I buy beef knuckle bones, which are big joint bones from the animal, and provide collagen, cartilage, gelatin . . When these are slow cooked for hours, the resulting stock is chilled, the fat layer discarded and the remaining bone broth (stock) is usually similar to 'jello' in consistency.

I suppose a big turkey leg would be suitable - what do you think? I've always saved my turkey broth for use in various dishes. I love it!
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, April 17, 2014, 6:16pm; Reply: 24
Quoted from Chloe
I hope you find this video helpful.  I've been faithfully doing these exercises daily and can really
tell the difference.  
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4hklBS5UQaw

Thanks for posting this, Chloe. I'm going to try them even though I don't have any particular problems with my knees. But strengthening our knees is like putting money in the bank in my opinion!

Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, April 17, 2014, 9:36pm; Reply: 25
Quoted from Spring
I suppose a big turkey leg would be suitable - what do you think? I've always saved my turkey broth for use in various dishes. I love it!

I also use turkey bones to make broth for soup, etc.  I'm not sure if they qualify for marrow bones or not, but I do crack / break them in two to get the richness from the center.
Posted by: evenkeel, Thursday, July 10, 2014, 11:46pm; Reply: 26
Quoted from san j

Okay, the Encyclopedia shows ...   N-acetyl glucosamine for O   ....  The arthritis book corroborates the above re: O


So is this stuff real "n-acetyl-glucosamine"  the gal at the health food store looked at me like I had two heads when I asked...
Posted by: evenkeel, Wednesday, July 16, 2014, 8:04pm; Reply: 27
Well I picked up some NAG (N-Acetyl Glucomanine) at the Vitamin Store.  Is this supplement more for the cartilage and will it help the meniscus?  Is there something else I could be taking besides NAG for my meniscus?  
Posted by: ginnyTN, Wednesday, July 16, 2014, 10:38pm; Reply: 28
Perhaps this won't help you but it has made a huge difference to my husband's bad knee.  Most often when he wakes up in the morning he almost falls when he tries to walk, but after he's on his feet a while his knee gets better.  It's probably arthritis, which might not be your problem at all.

Anyway, since we've been eating about a dozen black sweet cherries every day his knee is SO much better!   You might give it a try.  When they aren't fresh I use frozen......organic in both forms.  
Posted by: evenkeel, Thursday, July 17, 2014, 11:40am; Reply: 29
They probably help relax the muscles and reduce pulling on the inflamed areas in his joints.  Also may thin his blood and increase circulation to his joints.  Since he is more relaxed, he probably sleeps better, too.
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