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BTD Forums  /  Supp Right For Your Type  /  Help - Insomnia
Posted by: BluesSinger, Sunday, March 16, 2014, 11:54pm
I take my magnesium and a very small amount of L-tryptophan before bed each evening.  For the last years or so my insomnia has been getting worse and worse.  I wake up around 2:30 and cannot get back to sleep for 90 to 120 min.  

I'm not sure what to do.  Should I attempt Melatonin?  

I tried it before and it seems I wake up on it as well.  Can I take it after I wake up at 2:30 am?  

I cannot take 5-htp as it is not recommended for O's.  

help!  Today has been the worst fatigue from a build up of several nights of insomnia.  I'm sure this is hormonal related as I am in menopause and having hot flashes as well.  At night they are worse than in the daytime.  

Thanks much.  
Posted by: Lola, Monday, March 17, 2014, 12:38am; Reply: 1
try methyl 12
Posted by: jayneeo, Monday, March 17, 2014, 5:28am; Reply: 2
good idea, (what Lola said)….I myself had a ton of trouble with insomnia for years. So I ended up with a multi pronged approach involving Feminessence maca for hormonal balance, melatonin, (until I had truly reached a maximum level, then began to take much smaller dose.), magnesium glycinate, and p5p, a form of B-6. Then I added inositol…and I began to get results. Now I still wake up a few times a night, but I go back to sleep and get about 6-7 hrs sleep. Take all but the maca at bedtime.
Posted by: BluesSinger, Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 2:06pm; Reply: 3
Quoted from jayneeo
good idea, (what Lola said)….I myself had a ton of trouble with insomnia for years. So I ended up with a multi pronged approach involving Feminessence maca for hormonal balance, melatonin, (until I had truly reached a maximum level, then began to take much smaller dose.), magnesium glycinate, and p5p, a form of B-6. Then I added inositol…and I began to get results. Now I still wake up a few times a night, but I go back to sleep and get about 6-7 hrs sleep. Take all but the maca at bedtime.


Hey there.. I just started taking these supp's http://www.macafem.com/?gclid=CNKJ2oygnL0CFaw-Mgodml4AqQ
and I hope they help.  

I have not tried the Melatonin as yet... but I guess I will give that a try tonight and move away from the L-Trypophan.  I take Magnesium and I get all my B's from my multi vitamin.  I'm afraid to take too much of the B's.  Should I be afraid? What's Inositol?
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 2:20pm; Reply: 4
Melatonin dose is important-- I use melatonin and valerian together I am an A- :)
Posted by: jayneeo, Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 3:12pm; Reply: 5
I used valerian and melatonin for years but ran into some very serious insomnia in recent years.
I cannot recommend, not being a doc, just saying what worked... as I know how desperate one can get with no sleep.
Posted by: Chloe, Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 4:44pm; Reply: 6
I need 10 mg of melatonin before bed in order to fall asleep easily and stay asleep. (Just letting you
know I see the shift and Dr. D so I'm not self prescribing this high dose for myself)  I've tried skipping
a night to see what happens and I'm wide awake....so for some reason, I need melatonin nightly.

And magnesium sometimes makes me feel energized so I try to take it with lunch or dinner, not
before bed. I also have a small glass of sour cherry juice which is beneficial for me....It has natural
melatonin.

I drink Sip Right tea after dinner with a little bit of manuka honey.  I seem to require a lot of "stuff"
in order to sleep well...

Oh and if my dinner is too high in carbs, I don't sleep well...so I'm careful that my dinner is balanced
and on the low glycemic side....Blood sugar fluctuations during the night can disturb sleep for me.

I don't drink coffee or alcohol....but on nights I've had a little wine, I was up all night.  Same if I
eat a little dark chocolate or have decaf coffee.  Any amount of caffeine disturbs my sleep.

Might be different for you BeluesSinger as our blood types are different.  I just know that I was
once a rotten sleeper and now I'm a great sleeper.

Sometimes if adrenal function is off, sleeping is poor.

Posted by: BluesSinger, Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 6:05pm; Reply: 7
I might try Melatonin and L-Tryptophan together tonight.  
Posted by: Chloe, Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 6:44pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from BluesSinger
I might try Melatonin and L-Tryptophan together tonight.  


Sounds good. :) Please share if this helps.......I have a friend who hasn't been sleeping well and
would love to be able to offer her a new suggestion.......I used to take tryptophan but find I no longer need it.

Is your room dark enough?  We're having a full moon right now and I noticed light streaming in
the bedroom through the shades....I sleep with a mask during a full moon.

Posted by: Lloyd, Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 11:44pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from BluesSinger
I might try Melatonin and L-Tryptophan together tonight.  


Consider using a timed-release version of melatonin.

Posted by: Chloe, Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 11:59pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from Lloyd


Consider using a timed-release version of melatonin.



Just wanted to share that the timed release version of melatonin works for my Warrior husband. 6 mg.  I tried his formula and was up all night. I couldn't fall asleep nor could I stay asleep. It was if I had taken nothing...  He tried my 10 mg (not timed release) and although he fell asleep very easily, he was up every hour after that.

Might have something to do with how we uniquely metabolize our nutrients and foods. I don't
need timed release.  Everything seems to move through my body very slowly... I feel my 10 mg of melatonin wearing off just as it starts to get light outside. Lasts from about 11 pm till 7 am...

I'm sure we're all different in this respect.

Wanted to share this
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/274188.php

Posted by: aussielady582, Wednesday, March 19, 2014, 3:55am; Reply: 11
wish you luck with above suggestions.
For me, it is all about better digestion, lifestyle factors, exercise, more time in sun when it shines, more balanced way of living, more live raw food, yoga/deep breathing exercises, less stimulation for the brain (less tv, etc) for starters.
I am concerned that by using melatonin, the body then may not do it naturally, and I am trying to keep my glands alive or wake them up through regeneration/better nutrition, not close them down. I guess we all find what works.
The blood sugar comment above, I relate to, now I do  not eat fruits/sweeteners after midday, so the liver/pancreas area is more balanced and not stressed.
The 2:30 time is gall bladder time in terms of TCM, and 'vata' time in Ayurveda, which is a whole other topic, worry/stress can affect our sleep too.
Posted by: BluesSinger, Thursday, March 27, 2014, 2:22am; Reply: 12
Quoted from Chloe


Sounds good. :) Please share if this helps.......I have a friend who hasn't been sleeping well and
would love to be able to offer her a new suggestion.......I used to take tryptophan but find I no longer need it.

Is your room dark enough?  We're having a full moon right now and I noticed light streaming in
the bedroom through the shades....I sleep with a mask during a full moon.



YES!!!! I have added 3mg of Melatonin to my night time supplement cocktail of L-Tryptophan, Magnesium, Bromelain, Probiotic, and Stinging Nettle Root.

Have had NO anxiety attacks since I started this regime.  I still wake up to go to the bathroom and when I get hot flashes.. but NO anxiety and I sleep my 8 hours!  
Posted by: Vista, Thursday, March 27, 2014, 4:26pm; Reply: 13
Have you tried blue blockers? I have suffered from insomnia and disturbed sleep for many years and have tried several types of sleep medication including benzodiazepine receptor agonists like Zolpidem, Propavan (propiomazine), Atarax (hydroxyzine), valerian and melatonin but the best solution for me to cure insomnia and to get a good natural sleep has been to use blue blockers and there are no side effects. Blue-blockers block the blue light coming from computer and tv screens, mobile phones, tablets etc. which supresses the natural production of melatonin.

Here's an informative article about blue light and glasses that effectively blocks blue light:

http://www.psycheducation.org/depression/LightDark.htm

Quoted Text
Where can I buy the yellow eyeglasses?

All you need to try this idea is a pair of glasses with yellow lenses that will block blue wavelengths. Careful, however: you need 100% blockade of the blue wavelength, while allowing all of the other wavelengths to be transmitted. Typical "blue blockers", widely available on the Internet for about $10, only block a fraction of blue light. So far, I know of two sources of lenses that block >90% of blue light. You can go to the original source, http://www.lowbluelights.com. Their amber lenses are about $50. But...

Here is another approach. A local sleep specialist found a way to get the same lenses for $7, instead of $50. A company called UVEX, which makes ski goggles, also makes safety lenses for all sorts of purposes. They have just the right lens tint in a pair of safety glasses for welders, sold in places like Airgas.

If you do not wear corrective lenses, you can use the SKYPER in the SCT Orange lens, model # 3S1933X. If you wear corrective lenses (eyeglasses), here's a pair of amber lenses that seem to fit over my glasses quite well: the Ultraspec 2000 in the SCT Orange lens, model # S0360X.



and at the end of the text at the site you can see transmission data for the UVEX SCT Orange amber lenses:

http://www.psycheducation.org/depression/LightDark.htm#UVEX

Since I started wearing the blue blocker glasses I have no trouble anymore with insomnia and disturbed sleep and I also fall asleep rather quickly and not as before after several hours. I seldom use sleep medication anymore and if I need to I only use Atarax or melatonin nowadays. Before I bought the blue blockers I could lie awake for hours and hours and sometimes I couldn't sleep for the whole night even if I took sleeping pills. I was very exhausted and tired sometimes because of this but now I feel fine again and the solution with these glasses are like a miracle to me. I usually wear the glasses from around 7 pm to around 10 pm when I go to bed.

Here's some more info about how the blue light affects us:

Quoted Text
Goggles with orange lenses block blue light to help you get to sleep

Published: Tuesday, June 22, 2010, 10:30 AM Updated: Tuesday, June 22, 2010, 10:38 AM, By Evelyn Theiss, The Plain Dealer

Americans generally don't get enough sleep. That's well known.

Part of the reason, say many of the sleep-deprived, is that they have a hard time winding down and falling asleep.

In recent years, sleep experts have been talking about how blue light -- the kind given off by computer screens and televisions, as well as the ambient light in your house -- can make sleep more difficult.
Why?
Because blue light suppresses melatonin, the hormone that encourages slumber.


Read more here:
http://www.cleveland.com/healthfit/index.ssf/2010/06/goggles_with_orange_lenses_blo.html


Quoted Text
Blocking the blue light blues: Glasses help wearers get better sleep

March 5, 2008 5:00 AM, By Sally Kalson, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Blue light is a major emanation from television and computer screens, fluorescent light bulbs and, to a lesser extent, incandescent light bulbs. That means people who are glued to the tube, surfing the Web or reading by lamp light late into the night are unwittingly pushing back their body's "start time" for melatonin production.

"If the eyes are exposed to light at bed time, it will prevent the pineal gland from producing melatonin until you go into darkness," Dr. Hansler said. "If the light continues for a longer time, it can actually prevent the body from making melatonin that whole night.


Read more here:
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/08065/862394-51.stm


Quoted Text
Photophobia (Light Sensitivity)

People with a lighter eye color also may experience more light sensitivity in environments such as bright sunlight, because darker-colored eyes contain more pigment to protect against harsh lighting.


Read more here:
http://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/lightsensitive.htm

I don't suffer from bipolar disorder but the glasses have worked for me and also for other people I know of.
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Sunday, March 30, 2014, 10:51pm; Reply: 14
Just went to the COE and they recommended-- tranquilty at 11 am and bed time to reset your clock-
Posted by: jayneeo, Monday, March 31, 2014, 2:56am; Reply: 15
I couldnt find this product...
Posted by: Chloe, Monday, March 31, 2014, 3:40pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from jayneeo
I couldnt find this product...


http://www.4yourtype.com/prodinfo.asp?number=NP035

Posted by: san j, Saturday, April 5, 2014, 6:35am; Reply: 17
I like Lola's suggestion of methyl B-12 for an O.
Also - some O's need far more calcium than their diets afford, and the middle-of-night-waking variety of insomnia is often mineral-related, so consider beefing up your calcium supplementation, or taking it closer to bedtime.
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, April 5, 2014, 8:07am; Reply: 18
I am all for B12 ;D
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