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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Perpetual Soup or Bone Broth the Easy Way article
Posted by: Dianne, Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 5:41pm
This is up my alley and will ensure that I have bone broth 24/7. I did not realize that it costs only about $5.00 weekly to run a slow cooker continually.

I miss the health benefits of bone broth and this will work for me and my busy schedule.  :)

http://nourishedkitchen.com/perpetual-soup-the-easiest-bone-broth-youll-make/
Posted by: Seraffa, Wednesday, March 12, 2014, 6:16am; Reply: 1
Oh wow. This echoes the reading I did about "Medieval Year Round Soup"  :)
I only get them as black dots. Maybe some parsnips and leeks can mimic them in the cooker.
Posted by: shoulderblade, Wednesday, March 12, 2014, 6:25am; Reply: 2
Sounds feasible to me. The only question I would have is whether a single chicken frame can hold out for a weeks worth (stated 4 1/2 gallons) of quality broth. Good luck finding data on this but it would seem to me that you would get a rush of nutrients early and the return would diminish as time wore on. (cooking continuously for a week is high energy input overall)

I usually get a chicken frame ($1) or collect chicken bones in the freezer, break the big bones and simmer them a day or so for a stew. Not exactly 24/7 availability but I figure I get the maximum benefit with minimal effort.

The electrical cost seems reasonable to me. After all once you have the broth heated up it is only a matter of inputting enough heat to maintain the temperature.
Posted by: Dianne, Wednesday, March 12, 2014, 12:04pm; Reply: 3
At present, I have done the first bath with marrow bones that are 2" each. I think that would be more substantial than simply chicken bones myself. As an explorer, marrow is of great benefit to my health.

I have set it up in my laundry room which is more like a summer kitchen and the RO water filter is there as well which is convenient but there is no door for this room. When I came in from being out last night, I did not like that I was met with the aroma of cooking bones. I would not want this to be a constant smell...so I will try it next week in a closed in room and in the spring/summer use my back deck which is closed in with screens, windows and a door to keep wandering animals out. It is off of the dining room/kitchen area.  :)
Posted by: Lin, Wednesday, March 12, 2014, 1:21pm; Reply: 4
I use chicken carcass to create broth and them use ice cube trays to freeze it so I can just pop one or two in two soups I make.  I like the idea of having broth on the go all the time though, could be a good pick me up w hen the hunger pangs kick in.
Lin
Posted by: Dianne, Wednesday, March 12, 2014, 10:10pm; Reply: 5
Well, I had one cup of this before breakfast, but did not realize how fatty it was and this no gallbladder Explorer's liver let her know all day that this was a bad idea. When I came home today, this time I ladled it into one of those containers for making gravy that separates the fat and this was much better with a pinch of salt added. So all in all, refining it.  :)
Posted by: Dianne, Wednesday, March 19, 2014, 12:45pm; Reply: 6
I started this method on March 11th in the afternoon and stopped it on Sunday (16th). While this is a  terrific way to have the broth at one's disposal so easily, I could not get past the whole house smelling of cooking bones!  :o And so...I will retry this when I can do it outside on my enclosed patio and see how that goes.

The marrow that I pulled out of the bones was way too fatty for me cooked in with the stock. I asked my husband to finish it off and he has excellent digestion and it was repeating on him all day.

From now on, I will roast the bones first and extract the marrow before making stock. When I've done this in the past, the marrow is wonderful and it is advised by Dr. D'Adamo for us Explorers.

Well, a lesson learned.  :)
Posted by: san j, Sunday, March 30, 2014, 5:22am; Reply: 7
Quoted from Dianne
This is up my alley and will ensure that I have bone broth 24/7. I did not realize that it costs only about $5.00 weekly to run a slow cooker continually.


Actually, adding $20 to one's monthly electrical bill can represent a significant percentage of one's bill. To incur it in order to make one culinary item is not necessarily something most would choose. But, of course, to each his or her own!

Posted by: Goldie, Sunday, March 30, 2014, 2:10pm; Reply: 8
I was told amny years ago that cooking vegetables rich in Vitamins .. in a slow cooker for 3 days is the way to take out all the neutriens.  After that you discard the veggies, as  even the dog would not eat them any more.   I think the same would eb good for any bones.. longer 'constant' cooking is over kill. but having the broth ready is a great ideas..

I think chicken bones .(I do not like chicken cooking smells). not for me.. maybe turkey yes.. but I never made any, beef yes.. and the 'jelly' is good for our bones..  

My granndmother made a soup broth with meat and bones every Saturday (ate the edable foods on Sunday) and jelled the whole liquid in the fridge.  Some fat on top was used for cooking, but the liquid was used for all other needs for cooking.  Nothing waisted.    

NOW reminding us when its 0 below freezing when it would be a welcome idea even that constant  heat might at least keep us warmer in the kitchen.. .. haha  
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