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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  sardines revisited
Posted by: Seraffa, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 3:44am
Why is it I can hardly eat them anymore, and especially on an empty stomach, making me ill afterwards?  :P :X these are the water packed kind  in tin with skin, entrails and bones. We still get them fresh frozen at the market but when I tried 6 months ago eating those....same thing....too strong for my digestion :X
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 4:01am; Reply: 1
I used to love them when I was a child, but I have had a hard time trying to adjust to them now. Last week I decided I was going to concoct something that would at least not smell so terrible and be fairly palatable. I used the sardines packed in water and after rinsing and draining added rice bran oil, herbs such as cilantro, etc., 1/2 teaspoon mayo, sea salt, garlic and crumbled sweet potato chips. It actually smelled pretty good and tasted better than I expected. The reason I added the chips was to cover the texture of bones in the mix.  :P The next time I will add celery. I think onion would work well, but I'm off onions for a while. And best of all, they "sat" very well on my stomach!
Posted by: cindyt, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 5:13am; Reply: 2
I read once that "sardine" is a generic term for many types of small fish.  I have noticed they seem to change size from one year to the next, so they may be a different species.  I've about reached the point where I can't eat them any more.
Posted by: ginnyTN, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 5:23am; Reply: 3
I never could get the whole ones with the skin and bones past my nose.  I know the skinless and boneless ones are not as healthful for us, but something you can stand to eat is much better than something that you absolutely cannot eat under any conditions!  

Until my new SWAMI I was mixing a can of skinless, boneless sardines with about 2 1/2 oz. goat chevre, a generous amount of finely chopped sweet onion, some wheat free organic tamari and chopped roasted red peppers.  On RyVita crisp bread it was sort of OK.  Stuffed into the medium size bella mushrooms and baked for 20 minutes it was really good.  

Now I can't have the goat cheese anymore, so it is even more of a challenge.  I don't know why goat meat is a diamond for me but goat milk anything is now a flat out avoid.  Not wanting to argue with SWAMI, just venting frustration.  
Posted by: Seraffa, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 5:24am; Reply: 4
Hmmmm....!  :B
And I can't eat canned salmon anymore. It does the same thing. Has to be fresh.
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 3:07pm; Reply: 5
Only sockeye is a superfood for me, and I don't particularly like it.
Posted by: BluesSinger, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 3:10pm; Reply: 6
Well we got some nice canned sardines from  Vital Choice

https://www.vitalchoice.com/shop/pc/viewCategories.asp?idCategory=223

recommended by someone on this board and they  have been giving me acid indigestion.  I mix them with rice flour, eggs, salt, green pepper, and maybe some cayenne and fry them as patties.  

i haven't tired them in a couple of months but now that my tummy is healed more, I may give it another go...

love these.
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 3:30pm; Reply: 7
I suppose I could give their sockeye a try. It would be great to actually enjoy salmon again.
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 5:10pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from BluesSinger
Well we got some nice canned sardines from  Vital Choice

https://www.vitalchoice.com/shop/pc/viewCategories.asp?idCategory=223

recommended by someone on this board and they  have been giving me acid indigestion.  I mix them with rice flour, eggs, salt, green pepper, and maybe some cayenne and fry them as patties.  

i haven't tired them in a couple of months but now that my tummy is healed more, I may give it another go...

love these.


It was probably me who recommended them.  I love their canned sardine fillets.  
I have a very sensitive digestion and get acid indigestion very easily.  If I ate the recipe you use, I would be in pain.  I can't combine grains with meat or fish because they cause heartburn for me.  Also bell pepper can give me indigestion.  All mixed together?   :X
Posted by: JJR, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 5:17pm; Reply: 9
I tried sardines a few times after starting all the D'Adamo diets and each time I felt yucky after eating them.  Not sure why.  Which to me is kind of strange because it's the only fish I ever met that I didn't seem to like.  I eat canned tuna and salmon with no problems.
Posted by: Adam, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 5:24pm; Reply: 10
Those with SWAMI's, check your Geno Harmonic section for sardines to see what you can combine with them for maximum effect.
Posted by: BluesSinger, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 6:50pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from Adam
Those with SWAMI's, check your Geno Harmonic section for sardines to see what you can combine with them for maximum effect.


excellent idea!  we can't eat black pepper but green is soft and very nice.  i have eaten other canned sardines in olive oil with this recipe and never gotten acid indigestion.  so i think it might be their oil.
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 6:54pm; Reply: 12
I knew it! Just imagine chocolate and sardines!!  :o Maybe some molasses would hide some of that smell/flavor. Dennis the Menace said that he could eat anything as long as it had catsup on it so maybe some of these crazy combos would work even for the taste buds! I suppose sorghum would classify as molasses, right? Nice, strong flavor, for sure! Or stir in some chocolate and pile it on those ol' smelly sardines! I gotta try this!! Maybe Dennis was right after all except we need other ingredients....
Posted by: ginnyTN, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 7:20pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from Spring
I knew it! Just imagine chocolate and sardines!!  :o Maybe some molasses would hide some of that smell/flavor. Dennis the Menace said that he could eat anything as long as it had catsup on it so maybe some of these crazy combos would work even for the taste buds! I suppose sorghum would classify as molasses, right? Nice, strong flavor, for sure! Or stir in some chocolate and pile it on those ol' smelly sardines! I gotta try this!! Maybe Dennis was right after all except we need other ingredients....


YEPPER!  I've had the same reaction to most of the suggested food combinations listed toward the end of my SWAMI report also.  My combinations list doesn't include sardines, but is really big on anchovies and also bok choy as being geno harmonic with about 3/4 of the things featured.  One of my favorites is "cranberry juice with anchovies, horseradish, white wine, bok choy and pumpkin flowers"............." --- actually that's one of the better ones.  

However - TO BE FAIR - AND SERIOUSLY:  Almost all the foods listed as initial items on that combinations list are not diamonds.  So I'm guessing that the specifically listed combinations of selected non diamond foods become diamond-like in your body.  At least, the one day I actually did make a meal using that list, I admit I felt really good.  I Just have so many diamonds that we really like that I haven't spent hardly any time figuring a menu using the other things that could be combined for maximum benefit.  
Posted by: Adam, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 7:46pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from Spring
I knew it! Just imagine chocolate and sardines!!  :o Maybe some molasses would hide some of that smell/flavor. Dennis the Menace said that he could eat anything as long as it had catsup on it so maybe some of these crazy combos would work even for the taste buds! I suppose sorghum would classify as molasses, right? Nice, strong flavor, for sure! Or stir in some chocolate and pile it on those ol' smelly sardines! I gotta try this!! Maybe Dennis was right after all except we need other ingredients....


With me it's simply sardines (Bela brand with olive oil) ◊, some lemon juice ◊, homemade curry powder super, homemade flax crackers ◊, and some red wine ◊.  All very Geno Harmonic, very diamond, no chocolate silliness involved, and no stomach issues afterwards.
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 8:02pm; Reply: 15
See? The lemon juice and red wine would be out for me. Both of them feel like they are burning a hole in my stomach!  I could deal with the curry and flax crackers, though.

Ginny, I absolutely adore bok choy but have never even gotten a glimpse of any that was organic. And it, along with other greens, are on the "dirty" list now. I wonder if the stuff is hard to grow? And, yes, the combinations, neutral or not, give a very special whallop that I've learned too.
Posted by: Adam, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 8:07pm; Reply: 16
Spring, do you have any other citrus on your SWAMI that would work?  Do you get white wine or beer?
Posted by: ginnyTN, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 8:08pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from Spring

Ginny, I absolutely adore bok choy but have never even gotten a glimpse of any that was organic. And it, along with other greens, are on the "dirty" list now. I wonder if the stuff is hard to grow? And, yes, the combinations, neutral or not, give a very special whallop that I've learned too.


Our Kroger store always used to carry organic bok choy.  UNTIL now when I have my new SWAMI.  They've switched to the pesticide laden kind now.  Maybe they will get some organic in again.  I don't get to town often enough to keep track of what they have from day to day.  Drat.  

Posted by: Mrs T O+, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 8:13pm; Reply: 18
Can you list any other brands that are good & real sardines?  We can get King Oscar & they are considered a good brand.  But I also have heard that many 'sardines' are not real, so we may get some avoids without realing it.
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 8:27pm; Reply: 19
I think the brand Victoria had mentioned would be good. But otherwise some of the most expensive I have tried are the worst. They must be packaged for really dyed-in-the-wool sardine fans. I finally settled, for now, on Crown Prince skinless & boneless in olive oil - but I do thoroughly drain them. They are wild caught.  I've also tried the water version with the whole caboodle of bones and "insides" that I used in the recipe I mentioned, and I could deal with that.
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 8:34pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from Adam
Spring, do you have any other citrus on your SWAMI that would work?  Do you get white wine or beer?


Yes, I can have grapefruit, but it is a big NO too, for now. I have tried it over and over again to see if I could tolerate it - maybe someday I can because I really like it and lemon too. Can't have beer. White wine is a neutral, but it has the same effect as the citrus. Corn played a big part in messing up my esophagus, and my doctor said I had scar tissue - that may be a big reason why I can't tolerate these things, and it may never get better. I keep hoping, though.
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 9:24pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from Spring
I think the brand Victoria had mentioned would be good. But otherwise some of the most expensive I have tried are the worst. They must be packaged for really dyed-in-the-wool sardine fans.


I even thoroughly drain those good Vital Choice ones packed in organic extra virgin olive oil, and add my own olive oil.  Not sure why, just seems to be better in my system.

Sardines packed in water taste more tough to me.  
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 10:14pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from Victoria
I even thoroughly drain those good Vital Choice ones packed in organic extra virgin olive oil, and add my own olive oil.  Not sure why, just seems to be better in my system.

Sardines packed in water taste more tough to me.  


Taste? Do they actually have much of a taste? A good one, that is!  :D Other than being watery! I think their tastelessness was the reason I could tolerate them, as long as I added a lot of other things to the mix.

Yes, I had the urge to drain all the olive oil, too, for some reason. But I am serious about trying the molasses and chocolate with sardines. Dr. D. must have something going for the combination! ;D
Posted by: JJR, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 11:09pm; Reply: 23
Quoted from Spring


Yes, I can have grapefruit, but it is a big NO too, for now. I have tried it over and over again to see if I could tolerate it - maybe someday I can because I really like it and lemon too. Can't have beer. White wine is a neutral, but it has the same effect as the citrus. Corn played a big part in messing up my esophagus, and my doctor said I had scar tissue - that may be a big reason why I can't tolerate these things, and it may never get better. I keep hoping, though.


Too acidic for your stomach?  Lemons were doing that to me, but not grapefruit.  We haven't had any good grapefruit around here lately though.  I'm totally missing it.  

What's the "dirty" list?  What foods DON'T make that list.  It's like it's all bad.  Grrrrrrr......
Posted by: shoulderblade, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 11:32pm; Reply: 24
Quoted from JJR
  

What's the "dirty" list?  What foods DON'T make that list.  It's like it's all bad.  Grrrrrrr......


Here is a thread on it. Some crops suffer more than others in mass production.

Dirty Dozen
Posted by: aussielady582, Thursday, March 6, 2014, 5:07am; Reply: 25
If sardines don't go down well, don't force yourself to eat them, just choose other fish or foods instead.  The nutrients in sardines can be found from many other sources.
In terms of canned sardines, I like King Oscar, or John West brand.
I also buy fresh sardines.
I buy other fish, such as flake, deep sea perch, cod - this week I bought rainbow trout which was delicious.
Sometimes it may be the fats/oils in sardines, which may bother you, as the fish in tins may have been cooked/smoked many months ago, but fresh sardines may be tolerated better.  Serving some fresh green herbs with fish is good idea, such as fresh coriander(cilantro), or add fresh lemon juice.
Posted by: BluesSinger, Thursday, March 6, 2014, 4:03pm; Reply: 26
Anyone ever used Sardines in a fish stew?  I'm wondering how they might blend in....
Posted by: Seraffa, Thursday, March 6, 2014, 4:26pm; Reply: 27
Quoted from BluesSinger
Anyone ever used Sardines in a fish stew?  I'm wondering how they might blend in....


http://www.betumi.com/2009/10/recipe-24-sardine-stew-in-flash.html -- curiously enough, an African recipie.
Posted by: Seraffa, Thursday, March 6, 2014, 4:28pm; Reply: 28
Quoted from Spring
I knew it! Just imagine chocolate and sardines!!  :o Maybe some molasses would hide some of that smell/flavor. Dennis the Menace said that he could eat anything as long as it had catsup on it so maybe some of these crazy combos would work even for the taste buds! I suppose sorghum would classify as molasses, right? Nice, strong flavor, for sure! Or stir in some chocolate and pile it on those ol' smelly sardines! I gotta try this!! Maybe Dennis was right after all except we need other ingredients....


LMBO, Spring!....... :B :D
Posted by: Seraffa, Thursday, March 6, 2014, 4:47pm; Reply: 29
HEY GUYS - I "did" find an answer in "Genoharmonic" that may explain why real or imagined sardines are not that digestible at first! Mine are paired with Soy Lecithin and Soy Meal. I must not be able to emulsify their fish oil as well as other people right off the bat. And yes I think it's a good idea to check and see if some sardines look true to fish family form as the original tiny ones.
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, March 6, 2014, 5:54pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from Seraffa
HEY GUYS - I "did" find an answer in "Genoharmonic" that may explain why real or imagined sardines are not that digestible at first! Mine are paired with Soy Lecithin and Soy Meal. I must not be able to emulsify their fish oil as well as other people right off the bat. And yes I think it's a good idea to check and see if some sardines look true to fish family form as the original tiny ones.
Good for you! So I can add lecithin (soy meal is not to be found for humans - at least I haven't found it), to my molasses/chocolate super duper, high-powered sardine dish. Carob Extract would work for this since it has chocolate so I could add a little of that too! I think I am going to start off using this as a snack because I don't want to ruin an entire meal experimenting...

As for "real" sardines being replaced with some other fish, I think they would have to put a few real ones in a package, at least, because tiny little fish like that don't ordinarily stink like sardines unless they are dead for a while! Not any that I am familiar with, anyway.

AussieLady, if this works half as well as I think it will to give me energy and a super sense of well-being, it will be worth forcing it down. This has held true for other things I have run into using SWAMI so I am sort of used to it. But beans are another story. They make me feel great and I really like them, but the pain in my stomach overrides everything.
Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, March 6, 2014, 6:15pm; Reply: 31
Quoted from Spring
So I can add lecithin (soy meal is not to be found for humans - at least I haven't found it), to my molasses/chocolate super duper, high-powered sardine dish. Carob Extract would work for this since it has chocolate so I could add a little of that too! I think I am going to start off using this as a snack because I don't want to ruin an entire meal experimenting...

Only if your SWAMI says the same things as hers...   ;)   ;D
Posted by: Chloe, Thursday, March 6, 2014, 8:56pm; Reply: 32
you'd want to make sure the cans are BPA free, regardless of the sardines you purchase.

Check out this list.

http://bpafreecannedfood.wordpress.com/bpa-free-canned-food-brands/
Posted by: shoulderblade, Thursday, March 6, 2014, 10:28pm; Reply: 33
Quoted from BluesSinger
Anyone ever used Sardines in a fish stew?  I'm wondering how they might blend in....

Quoted from Seraffa


I think I am going to give this a try. I generally eat them right out of the can (catfooding. :D) but some sort of meal format would enable me  to get around the wide variety of commercial products. That is, 'cooking up' is a way past a canned product I do not particularly find pleasing. I always like to try anything new I come across but they usually don't pan out.  

Posted by: Spring, Friday, March 7, 2014, 1:29am; Reply: 34
So I will keep my recipes to myself from now on.
Posted by: Seraffa, Friday, March 7, 2014, 3:10am; Reply: 35
Quoted from Seraffa


"My grandfather ate the tiny sardines in oil in the flat tin box that you open with a key, and those can be used, but more common are the larger herrings that are canned with chili sauce or tomato sauce (NOTE: like those marketed by Goya) and that can be found in grocery stores in the Mexican or Asian food sections. "

I compared pictures of the fish. Come to think of it.....I've never really had a problem eating the Goya fish; I stopped buying them because I didn't like putting the excess fish with tomato into a plastic storage container to be forever smelly and stained. Not because I wouldn't eat the fish.

Could they be my beloved herrings?  :D Time to find out.
Posted by: sunnyside, Friday, March 7, 2014, 3:25am; Reply: 36
I eat sardine 3 times a week and I did my research on BPA cans last year.
My first choice is Crown Prince Natural sardines.
They have Crown Prince and Crown Prince Natural and only Natural lines are BPA free.
It is small in size compared to other brand and caught and processed near Scotland.
It us available from Amazon.com.
Wild Planet has good BPA free product but it us caught in US Pacific but processed in Thailand.
I may remember wrong in detail but Wild Planet is caught in one place and sent far for processing.

I just removed tumor from pancreas and it was precancerous.
I did not have any symptoms but found it accidentally and saved my life.
What you are eating and right type food is very important.
Posted by: Seraffa, Friday, March 7, 2014, 3:43am; Reply: 37
Quoted from sunnyside


I just removed tumor from pancreas and it was precancerous.
I did not have any symptoms but found it accidentally and saved my life.
What you are eating and right type food is very important.


Congratulations, Sunnyside!  :D
Posted by: santina, Friday, March 7, 2014, 11:24am; Reply: 38
Quoted from sunnyside
I eat sardine 3 times a week and I did my research on BPA cans last year.
My first choice is Crown Prince Natural sardines.
They have Crown Prince and Crown Prince Natural and only Natural lines are BPA free.
It is small in size compared to other brand and caught and processed near Scotland.
It us available from Amazon.com.
Wild Planet has good BPA free product but it us caught in US Pacific but processed in Thailand.
I may remember wrong in detail but Wild Planet is caught in one place and sent far for processing.

I just removed tumor from pancreas and it was precancerous.
I did not have any symptoms but found it accidentally and saved my life.
What you are eating and right type food is very important.


i found this site very helpful
http://www.seafoodwatch.org/cr/seafoodwatch/web/sfw_factsheet.aspx
i hope this helps you too :)
Posted by: Averno, Friday, March 7, 2014, 12:34pm; Reply: 39
Quoted from shoulderblade



I think I am going to give this a try. I generally eat them right out of the can (catfooding. :D)




Yup. We call this "fast food".  Forever more to be referred to as "catfooding"   :D

Posted by: Averno, Friday, March 7, 2014, 12:41pm; Reply: 40

Quoted from Spring
So I will keep my recipes to myself from now on.



I thought you were kidding until you posted the recipe. Why not re-post it so people can give it a try. I certainly will. Odd food combinations are real eye-openers sometimes, and chocolate goes with a lot of savory flavors.


Posted by: battle dwarf, Friday, March 7, 2014, 3:38pm; Reply: 41
I've always just eaten mine out of the can. first time I bought them was for my cat as a kitten. he was not interested but the smell called to me! I had not ever eaten them because my dad always got the ones in mustard sauce or hot sauce :P couldn't even stand the smell of those. for my little spooky I had the ones in olive oil and I went nuts on them. for a while I was eating a can every day and wanting a second  :o I still like them but they have become an emergency protean backup now and I just eat them when I feel a need for urgent protean. thought I would want them while pregnant but while good I just have not had the same craving for them that I had when I first started eating them a couple of years ago. I get the skinless/ boneless crown prince because the only other option is royal albert which while very good I just could not handle the fins, they were too much for me  :D
Posted by: Victoria, Saturday, March 8, 2014, 4:03am; Reply: 42
http://www.vitalchoice.com/shop/pc/FAQ_QView.asp?idFAQ=85
Vital Choice on their BPA policy.

The type of sardine they use:
"The true sardine from France, Spain, and Portugal is usually the young pilchard (Sardinia pilchardus)"
Posted by: Averno, Saturday, March 8, 2014, 2:07pm; Reply: 43
Lurking around the web, the subject gets into the weeds rather quickly. Here's a fairly digestible ( :P) explanation of sardine species:

Quoted Text
...there definitely is a kind of live, swimming-around fish called a sardine. Better yet, there are many kinds of live, swimming-around fish called sardines. But there are things that we don’t call sardines but are found in cans labeled “sardines.”

Science guys classify what ordinary folk call sardines into a family called Clupeidae, with brothers and sisters: herrings, sprat, menhaden, and shad. The next step down the classification chart is a fish’s genus, separating the Clupeidae into smaller groups based on physical characteristics and habitat. About 17 genera of fish called sardines. Next step, with very specific characteristics, is the fish’s species. Dozens and dozens of “sardine” species from warm, cold, fresh, brackish, or marine waters around the world: Atlantic sardine, India-oil sardine, perforated-scale sardine, Reader sardine — really. From St. Lucia. Not kidding. So there’s your free-range sardines.

Sardines with their heads chopped off are a slightly different matter. The FDA permits a can labeled “sardines” to actually be a can of fish of the genera that include sprats, brislings, and small herrings, all of them being so closely related. So there’s your argument for a sardine not being a sardine until it’s put in a can. There are actually two internet sources that make your argument, too, one a supposed high-toned chef and the other some guy who writes for the Boston Globe as “Dr. Knowledge.” Both claim sardines aren’t sardines until they’re in a can. Sure, occasionally a herring is a herring until it’s put in a can labeled “sardines,” but that’s the exception. Worldwide, Sardina pilchardus is considered the “true” sardine; that’s a fish the Brits call a pilchard, we call a sardine. Following United Nations guidelines, any fish sold as a sardine that is not a pilchard-type has to bear a clarification of exactly what species of sardine it is. Of course, this is much ado about a foodstuff nobody likes anyway.




:o  Maybe this guy never tasted a good one!

Also keep in mind that olive oil is not always olive oil, especially when used as a packing ingredient. I would only trust the high-end, conscientious brands like Wild Planet, Vital Choice or Bela for this reason alone.



Posted by: Seraffa, Sunday, March 9, 2014, 3:56am; Reply: 44
(ok)
Posted by: Spring, Sunday, March 9, 2014, 5:54am; Reply: 45
We have gotten all bent out of shape about BPA, and, like so many things these days, some companies are replacing it with something that people are wondering if it might turn out to be even worse. ALL plastics apparently are bad in one way or another. So just because some companies say no BPA it may not mean a whole lot. I am beginning to wonder if some of us would eat anything out there if we knew everything little thing about how the food is handled before it comes up to thousands of miles sometimes to our kitchens! I am worn out with the subject. Some people want everything in glass, but how many vitamins are going to be left in food that is processed in clear glass by the time we get it? Are "dead" vegetables any worse than BPA that may or may not be in some foods? I am very uncomfortable with the thought of eating "dead" vegetables. Of course, that is the reason most of us take vitamins. Even when we eat all the organic stuff we can find. After all, it has a limited shelf life itself - much less than the vitamins are supposed to have. I don't know how fish or meat would be affected by being stored in clear glass. And companies are not willing to preserve all foods in clear glass because of the cost, so, of course, they wouldn't want to be bothered with using colored glass!

King Oscar and Crown Prince claim to catch their fish off the coast of Morocco.
Sardina pilchardus.
Posted by: shoulderblade, Sunday, March 9, 2014, 6:58am; Reply: 46
Quoted from Averno

Yup. We call this "fast food".  Forever more to be referred to as "catfooding"   :D

A term I picked up from Peppermint Twist indicating eating food right out of a can, my usual approach to Sardines.  ;D
Quoted from Averno

Maybe this guy never tasted a good one!

Also keep in mind that olive oil is not always olive oil, especially when used as a packing ingredient. I would only trust the high-end, conscientious brands like Wild Planet, Vital Choice or Bela for this reason alone.


Overall the unpopularity of Sardines is a blessing; it keeps prices down. :) Although I cannot resist trying out any new brand I come across it is probably best to find a good product and stick with it. For the price they have to ne among the best nutritional deals going.

Posted by: Spring, Monday, March 10, 2014, 8:00pm; Reply: 47
Reply to my email to Kroger.:

Thank you for contacting Customer Connect. I am pleased to inform you that Kroger is working diligently to limit the BPA in many of our products’ packaging. Many canned goods have a thin lining containing a small amount of BPA to ensure the safety of the product until a customer is ready to use the product. While there is no conclusive scientific evidence that this minimal exposure to BPA in can linings poses any risks to consumers, Kroger has begun a process that we believe will result in the removal of BPA in the linings of canned goods in all of our corporate brand items. We recognize that this transition will take time as our suppliers and manufacturers are still researching and testing feasible alternatives. This is a priority for our Company and we are moving forward with the transition as quickly as possible.

In addition to our specific efforts with cans, Kroger is surveying all of our corporate brand food suppliers to determine if BPA is present in product packaging. Product formulations change frequently, as do our suppliers. And, particularly with regard to packaging, we may be unaware of changes that have occurred in components and/or processes. It’s because of this that we have been advised to refrain from attempting to say which of our products/containers do or do not contain BPA.

For information about any specific product, please feel free to call the number below or shoot us an email! Someone will be happy to look into it for you. I hope that you find this information helpful. My name is Sara and if I can be of further assistance, please simply respond to this email or call 1-800-576-4377.
Posted by: Chloe, Monday, March 10, 2014, 8:12pm; Reply: 48
What these industries do is take complaints from consumers seriously as we reject their products
once the word is out..... but then go back to the chemical labs to come up with replacements....We're all caught up looking for BPA free cans....whey they sneak in a replacement chemical called BPS....likely worse..  :(

http://www.infowars.com/bpa-finally-banned-from-baby-bottles-only-to-be-replaced-by-deadly-bps-chemical/

which plastics are safe
http://www.care2.com/greenliving/which-plastics-are-safe.html

Should this subject be come a new thread?
Posted by: JJR, Monday, March 10, 2014, 9:07pm; Reply: 49
I'm with you spring.  My big pet peave, and I've probably said it before a bunch, is that I'll buy organic produce and unless you eat it that night, it gets moldy real quickly.  And sometimes the berries are moldy regardless of how quickly you eat them.  So whats worse?  Consuming fruits and veggies with pesticides or mold?  For my mind, I'd take the former.  And it's quite possible that my body would rather have pesticides than mold too.  I don't know.  

I eat a lot of frozen fruits and veggies.  Some fruits aren't as susceptible as others.  But any fruit that sits in a huge bin with some other fruits with some moisture is going to be susceptible to molds.  Even my apples I've been peeling them because I'm not quite ready to eat something that I've washed with soap.  I know a gal that says she felt a lot better when she started using this veggie wash.  But then it's just another thing to do in an already crazy busy world. So, I wash my apples with water, dry off and rinse one more time.  And then peel.  LOL.  That's what I do.  I guess that's as much work as washing with some kind of soap too.  But I'm more comfortable with it this way.  

I don't feel as crazy about freezer stuff and I don't think I've ever found mold on any frozen berries I've found.  Although maybe I just don't know.  Who knows.  

It's like you said Spring, none of it is perfect.  All we can do is our best and that's that.  Short of growing all our own food and sheep and turkeys and eggs from chickens, you can only eat what is offered at the stores.  And if you go to the all fru fru all organic places, be prepared to get a 2nd mortgage on your home to afford it.  
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 3:54am; Reply: 50
Anyone wanting to try new tastes should look at this site. Wow!:
http://penandfork.com/tips-tutorials/fresh-ground-cardamom/
I am into using fresh ground cardamom, and the other spices that work well with this wonderful seed is astonishing! I LOVE cardamom. A very good sub for black pepper to me, besides, as someone suggested, using it with a bit of cloves is amazing! These women posting their "inventions" on the site are a fun read!
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 4:05am; Reply: 51
JJR, a manager in one grocery told me that she hardly ate anything fresh anymore because the frozen was at its peak when they froze it, and she knew all about how veggies and fruits lay around wilting, molding and becoming otherwise unpalatable in stores. She mentioned some of the tricks groceries use to "freshen" things up. In other words, to get them "dressed up" so they can get them out the door. Check out the article in a recent Readers' Digest about grocery stores..... A real eye-opener.
http://www.rd.com/slideshows/supermarket-tricks/#slideshow=slide1
Yes, Chloe, that is why I mentioned that in my post. I think that is why Kroger is taking their time about hoping to get it right. Time will tell...
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 4:16pm; Reply: 52
The bummer is that some foods do seem to be better when eaten fresh.  Like the times I've had frozen pineapple, the enzymes don't seem as, well, lively as when I eat it fresh.  Plus a fresh one just tastes way better.  And some fruits I never see frozen.  Like plums.  

But yeah, that link said an apple is like 14 months old on average.  Wow.  
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 7:10pm; Reply: 53
Quoted from JJR
The bummer is that some foods do seem to be better when eaten fresh.  Like the times I've had frozen pineapple, the enzymes don't seem as, well, lively as when I eat it fresh.  Plus a fresh one just tastes way better.  And some fruits I never see frozen.  Like plums.  

But yeah, that link said an apple is like 14 months old on average.  Wow.  


I freeze organic bananas for short periods. I would try to freeze plums, but they are a neutral for me. I love them though! As for apples, I don't think they   will ever make an organic apple that will last "indefinitely!" I know an agronomist who told me some time ago that they were trying to develop an apple that would stay "fresh" for FOUR years!! I think after four years any fruit would be considered "INorganic" in every sense of the word! I found some fresh, delicious, seedless grapes and there were far too many to finish off before they spoiled so I froze them. What a treat they are! So much better than regular, non-organic grapes. And I don't have to worry about mold, etc.. I freeze watermelon, too, so I can have it during the winter months when we only see mushy, pathetic, imported varieties. I buy them every week during the summer, though.
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 8:29pm; Reply: 54
I love watermelon!
Posted by: shoulderblade, Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 10:24pm; Reply: 55
Quoted from JJR
But yeah, that link said an apple is like 14 months old on average.  Wow.  


"On average", that means many are even longer. How about this:

Quoted from posted article
Milk, bread, bananas, and eggs. Ninety-five percent of shoppers have no idea what all the other items cost and don’t know if they’re getting a good deal when they buy them. —Martin Lindstrom


Quoted from Spring
I freeze watermelon, too, so I can have it during the winter months when we only see mushy, pathetic, imported varieties.


Good idea!  ;D We import here during the summer (mainly from GA, I think) but it is certainly much better stuff than whatever is available in winter. I have been a seasonal eater on this but will be sure to freeze this summer.  :)
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, March 12, 2014, 2:42am; Reply: 56
I have found the easiest way to freeze watermelon is to slice and whack into bite sized pieces and freeze on a cookie sheet. Also, I give them a good sprinkle of Trehalose Complex. After the pieces are frozen I quickly (so they don't begin to thaw and stick together when they refreeze) pack them in gallon size freezer bags. Or in any other container with a lid that is handy to get into. There are some Youtube instructions for this, but it is very simple to do.
Posted by: aussielady582, Wednesday, March 12, 2014, 3:10am; Reply: 57
good comments above, must re-visit this thread again.
sardines can cause problems if one's liver function is sluggish or there has been buildup of toxicity in body, it may have nothing to do with the tin/can or other ingredients.
Also, sardines are often caught a long way from where one lives, and so is not really fresh seasonal produce.
I may still eat some sardines, but will buy local fresh white flesh fish too, this week, Coral trout; had some for lunch today with vegetables in ghee and spices, over white basmati rice, fresh coriander(cilantro). Still have to freeze some portions, as can't always get to the fish shop when I need to.
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, March 12, 2014, 4:58am; Reply: 58
I don't think I will buy any "fresh" fish anytime soon. It seems that most of it here is "previously frozen" so why should I not just buy the frozen and not worry about it. I won't ever forget the time we bought some very nice appearing fish at Kroger only to see big black worms crawling out of it in the pan. One of the most horrible experiences I ever had in a kitchen! The people at the store nearly had as big of a shock as I did when I called and told them about it. I love fresh fish when we visit Florida. There is nothing quite like it, and it should be a big part of my diet but finding any here that was not packaged in China was next to impossible for a while. Lately, though, I have found some that is not - maybe they got too many complaints.

A few years ago before I found out I couldn't eat shrimp because of serious side effects, my husband's brother flew his plane to Florida and bought a huge pile of them that were fresh out of the water. My mother-in-law worked all afternoon cleaning them and invited us over for the feast!  Oh, boy, were they evermore delicious!! I ate a few dozen of them!  :o How I do miss shrimp! And my mother-in-law.
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, March 12, 2014, 5:02am; Reply: 59
Quoted from JJR
The bummer is that some foods do seem to be better when eaten fresh.  Like the times I've had frozen pineapple, the enzymes don't seem as, well, lively as when I eat it fresh.  

I love frozen pineapple as a treat, but the real deal is a really good fresh one!! They are sooo good!
Posted by: Seraffa, Wednesday, March 12, 2014, 6:09am; Reply: 60
Quoted from aussielady582
good comments above, must re-visit this thread again.
sardines can cause problems if one's liver function is sluggish or there has been buildup of toxicity in body, it may have nothing to do with the tin/can or other ingredients.
Also, sardines are often caught a long way from where one lives, and so is not really fresh seasonal produce.
I may still eat some sardines, but will buy local fresh white flesh fish too, this week, Coral trout; had some for lunch today with vegetables in ghee and spices, over white basmati rice, fresh coriander(cilantro). Still have to freeze some portions, as can't always get to the fish shop when I need to.


I have my bottle of soy lecithin at the ready, and small can of 3 actual sardines in tomato sauce. I will avoid eating the livers. Ready to try when I wake up! *I can do this*.......(woot)

Lecithin helps me all the way around. I had it in an octopus stir-fry last night with garlic powder, lime juice and evoo. Soooooo  tasty..... :P
Posted by: Lin, Wednesday, March 12, 2014, 1:49pm; Reply: 61
I eat sardines, and want to thank you for the good information.  Especially the clarification on Sardines/Pilchards.  Will be looking for Sardina Pilchardus now!
Lin
Posted by: JJR, Wednesday, March 12, 2014, 3:34pm; Reply: 62
Interesting tidbit about the liver.  Because that's me.  Maybe that's why I have problems with them.  
Posted by: aussielady582, Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 5:39am; Reply: 63
Spring - sorry to hear about your experience with sardines, must have been a real shock.
I did read once that it may be best to eat fish after it has been frozen, because the freezing kills off worms/parasites. I guess one may now want to keep taking probiotics if eating fish or certain other types of animal or fish proteins.
Having certain spice or herbs may also help with eating fish, to make sure everything is well digested. And of course vegetables to keep things moving well.
I had sardines last week, and had a terrible time after (won't go into all the details right now), but it was more due to some of the other food I ate with them, rushing lunch, and not feeling so good on the day, and I had no choice but to eat lunch late, where I prefer to eat lunch around 12:00 midday.
Posted by: Averno, Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 1:08pm; Reply: 64
Only the cheaper, Norwegian style have the innards, etc.  I couldn't eat them on a dare.

Quoted Text

Now, to reverse a hackneyed simile, how do they pack the sardines into those cans like New Yorkers in the subway during rush hour? Surprisingly, it is still done mostly by hand. Machines sort the fish by size and decapitate, eviscerate and de-tail them, but human hands and eyes still do the best packing job.

What about the bones, guts and skins we find in many canned sardines? Are they edible? Yes. In the so-called Mediterranean method of processing, the fish are eviscerated and thoroughly cooked, either by steaming or frying, which is more expensive. In the Norwegian method, the fish are not eviscerated; they are kept alive in nets for at least 48 hours, during which time they complete the digestion of their food and clean themselves out. Then they are hot-smoked. The bones and skins are good for you; the bones contain calcium and the skins contain omega-3 fatty acids.

Unincarcerated Sardines

I received this week's question about sardines from a reader in Vienna, just as I was returning from Spain's Costa Brava -- specifically, Catalonia and its capital city, Barcelona. Catalonia is a self-governing region in northeastern Spain with its own language and culture. It is the birthplace of surrealism, not only in art (Joan Miro and Salvador Dalí were Catalan) and in architecture (Antonio Gaudí, ditto), but more recently in gastronomy, with the worldwide recognition of Catalonia's most creative and surrealistic chef, Ferran Adrià.

While in Catalonia, I ate some of the world's best sardines, not to mention anchovies and several anonymous little fishies.

We Americans may think of sardines as the contents of those small, flat cans with the rounded corners -- you know, the ones that splatter oil or sauce all over the counter when we tear off the lid. But in Catalonia the sardine rises to gastronomical eminence. There, fresh sardines six to eight inches long are either deep-fried or grilled (à la planxa in Catalan), often over a driftwood fire at the beach, and sprinkled with coarse salt. That's all. Tinsmiths need not apply.
Posted by: Averno, Tuesday, March 18, 2014, 1:10pm; Reply: 65

On fresh vs frozen fish:

http://seafoodhealthfacts.org/seafood_safety/patients/parasites.php
Posted by: aussielady582, Wednesday, March 19, 2014, 3:47am; Reply: 66
Thankyou, Averno. I'll be back next week to read your link, mentioned above - as looks interesting.
Posted by: Seraffa, Monday, March 24, 2014, 3:06pm; Reply: 67
Great news - Roland brand Sardines (tinned, in tomato sauce, for 99 cents) are clean and eviscerated

- and happen to cause me no problems since I have been adding lecithin to the diet.  :) But I think I'd like to make them into patties like Spring does. Plain sardines do get boring (goofy)
Posted by: Amazone I., Monday, March 24, 2014, 4:47pm; Reply: 68
very high in purines.... :P...(the mentioned fish... I'm talkin about ;) ;D )...
Posted by: Maria Giovanna, Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 3:52pm; Reply: 69
Do you mean gout risk Isa ? I eat sardines one or 2 (seldom) times a week)
Posted by: Seraffa, Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 8:50pm; Reply: 70
Quoted from Amazone I.
very high in purines.... :P...(the mentioned fish... I'm talkin about ;) ;D )...


Oh good well now you can have horse and I can still get purines nevertheless  :)
Posted by: Possum, Tuesday, March 25, 2014, 11:34pm; Reply: 71
Why would you want purines?
Posted by: Averno, Wednesday, March 26, 2014, 2:38pm; Reply: 72

Might want to keep tabs on uric acid levels anyway.


Posted by: Amazone I., Wednesday, March 26, 2014, 6:18pm; Reply: 73
go for the healing mushies instead, dearest Maria Giovanna... in real and powder forms ;) ;D (smarty)(wiseman)(ondrugs)
Posted by: Seraffa, Thursday, March 27, 2014, 5:03pm; Reply: 74
When Isa says "a good source of purines" I think she literally means GOOD  :-/ !!
I not have time to look up every-thing ....
Posted by: sunnyside, Thursday, March 27, 2014, 8:03pm; Reply: 75
I am in shock to learn all sardine in the can is not true sardine from this thread.
In my Swami sardine is super, herring is neutral and anchovy is avoid.
Choosing true sardine is very important because I eat sardine 2 or 3 times a week.
I am checking with manufacturer to clarify what I was eating.

Thank you for educating me.
Posted by: Averno, Thursday, March 27, 2014, 8:12pm; Reply: 76

Education is what it's all about.  ;)
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, March 27, 2014, 11:34pm; Reply: 77
It's good to look deeply into our food choices.  Knowledge is power, after all.

We can always change brands, if we find that what we are buying and eating does not measure up to our standards for what we consider healthy enough to eat.  :)
Posted by: sunnyside, Friday, March 28, 2014, 12:01am; Reply: 78
So far I found 2 brands which is true sardine sardina pilchardus in BPA free can.

Vital Choice sardine
Crown Prince Natural Skinless and Boneless (only this item from Crown Prince)
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, March 28, 2014, 3:35am; Reply: 79
Quoted from sunnyside
So far I found 2 brands which is true sardine sardina pilchardus in BPA free can.

Vital Choice sardine
Crown Prince Natural Skinless and Boneless (only this item from Crown Prince)


I sure love the Vital Choice sardines!

Is the Crown Prince item packed in olive oil or water?
Posted by: Averno, Friday, March 28, 2014, 11:09am; Reply: 80
Quoted from sunnyside
So far I found 2 brands which is true sardine sardina pilchardus in BPA free can.

Vital Choice sardine
Crown Prince Natural Skinless and Boneless (only this item from Crown Prince)


Sunnyside, I'm curious about which brands you discovered which were not specifically pilchards. What did the reps say?

Posted by: sunnyside, Friday, March 28, 2014, 1:27pm; Reply: 81
Crown Prince has Crown Prince and Crown Prince Natural lines and only Crow Prince Natural line products are BPA free can.
Crown Prince Natural Skinless and Boneless comes in pure olive oil or water and they are sardina pilchardus.

Crown Prince Natural Wild Caught Brisling in Water is bristling or sprats in BPA free can.

Wild Planet sardine is sardinops sagax in BPA free can.
Posted by: san j, Friday, March 28, 2014, 10:08pm; Reply: 82
Thirty brands of canned sardines ranked for taste,
some described in great detail:
http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/301739
Posted by: susanC, Saturday, March 29, 2014, 6:45pm; Reply: 83
Hi all, I am loving this thread. As combining sardines in geno-harmonic combinations has been discussed here I'd like to jump in and ask a question about geno-harmonics that is not related to sardines.

I have four choices for geno-harmonics on my SWAMI and I am going to assume that everyone does. I have been following the 'best choice' that SWAMI has chosen for me.  Or should I be trying to incorporate all four at once?
Posted by: Possum, Sunday, March 30, 2014, 2:53am; Reply: 84
Quoted from Seraffa
When Isa says "a good source of purines" I think she literally means GOOD  :-/ !!
I not have time to look up every-thing ....
She actually said
Quoted from Amazone I.
very high in purines.... :P...(the mentioned fish... I'm talkin about ;) ;D )...
Depends how your uric acid levels are, re whether purines are good or not?!
Posted by: Seraffa, Sunday, March 30, 2014, 5:09am; Reply: 85
Quoted from Possum
She actually said Depends how your uric acid levels are, re whether purines are good or not?!


It was in a letter or thread  about a year ago talking to her about horse meat and how versatile the Type B diet is.....

I know, I'm amazing in my own obscurity, right (sunny)
Posted by: Seraffa, Sunday, March 30, 2014, 11:49pm; Reply: 86
Quoted from susanC
Hi all, I am loving this thread. As combining sardines in geno-harmonic combinations has been discussed here I'd like to jump in and ask a question about geno-harmonics that is not related to sardines.

I have four choices for geno-harmonics on my SWAMI and I am going to assume that everyone does. I have been following the 'best choice' that SWAMI has chosen for me.  Or should I be trying to incorporate all four at once?


I love genoharmonics. Mine are at the end of the SWAMI with a 5 star rating, and examples of other genoharmonics to pair them with.
...when you say four choices do you mean in the fish category?
...when you say best choice, do you mean a diamond food?

So far I have gone up to eating meals with 3 genoharmonic ingredients. But I'd like to have  a  full genoharmonic meal (protein, starch, vege, fat, fruit, condiment, beverage) beginning this week.
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