Print Topic - Archive

BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  amaranth
Posted by: santina, Friday, February 28, 2014, 1:33pm
does the amaranth (grain) need to be washed before cooking? ::) ::)

do you eat it only for breakfast/lunch or is it allowed for dinner also? ??) ??)

i've seen a recipe that mix it with buckwheat....i usually don't mix the grains, do i do well?? ??) ??)

thank you thank you all the cooks out there ;D ;D
Posted by: jayneeo, Friday, February 28, 2014, 5:33pm; Reply: 1
I love it cooked with rice…..
Posted by: Lola, Friday, February 28, 2014, 7:22pm; Reply: 2
in my country, amaranth comes natural, soft, no need to cook...like cereal

quinoa is what we cook, like rice or other grain
Posted by: aussielady582, Tuesday, March 4, 2014, 5:15am; Reply: 3
if you have strong healthy digestion, then mixing of grains may be ok, for others, I'd suggest not mixing grains/starches as is more work for the system and the digestive enzymes.
Also, if a person has damaged gut lining (small intestine), then I would not advise amaranth, due to the starch and the way it affects the villi on the surface of the intestine, which can be erroded over a long period of time, leading to food intolerance and auto-immune disease.  If you are feeling well and have no symptoms or digestive problems, then maybe amaranth is fine, but for others, I'd say not to eat it until health has improved, and then, maybe fermented grains may be easier to digest.
I'm grain free for now, and don't miss them at all, not even rice which I kept eating and found hard to give up. I think the taste buds start to get healthier & more balanced too.
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, March 4, 2014, 5:26am; Reply: 4
Quoted from jayneeo
I love it cooked with rice…..


I'll have to try this! It is very hard for me to stay interested in rice so maybe this will help.
Posted by: purity, Tuesday, March 4, 2014, 5:38am; Reply: 5

Amaranth should be washed. Cut off seed bundles, and set aside. Wash the stalk, leaves and root in cold water under a faucet or in a large bowl of water. The stalk, leaves and root are ready to use for cooking after washing in water.

Ingredients
(serves 1-2)
◾½ cup buckwheat groats
◾¼ cup amaranth
◾1 tbsp black chia seeds
◾2½ cups water
◾¼ cup unsweetened soy milk
◾¼ tsp salt
◾25g dried fruits (I had a mix of apricots, plums, apples and pears)
◾10 toasted hazelnuts, crushed
◾Bring water to a boil. Add salt, buckwheat groats, amaranth and chia. Cover, reduce heat and simmer for 15-20 minutes, stirring occasionally, until mixture is creamy and all water is absorbed.
◾Turn off the heat. Stir in milk, cover and let stand for 5 minutes.
◾Add dried fruits and hazelnuts. Stir to combine and transfer to serving bowl(s).
◾Add cold milk if desired.
hope this helps with your questions. Bon Appetite
Posted by: santina, Tuesday, March 4, 2014, 9:56am; Reply: 6
Quoted from aussielady582
if you have strong healthy digestion, then mixing of grains may be ok, for others, I'd suggest not mixing grains/starches as is more work for the system and the digestive enzymes.
Also, if a person has damaged gut lining (small intestine), then I would not advise amaranth, due to the starch and the way it affects the villi on the surface of the intestine, which can be erroded over a long period of time, leading to food intolerance and auto-immune disease.  If you are feeling well and have no symptoms or digestive problems, then maybe amaranth is fine, but for others, I'd say not to eat it until health has improved, and then, maybe fermented grains may be easier to digest.
I'm grain free for now, and don't miss them at all, not even rice which I kept eating and found hard to give up. I think the taste buds start to get healthier & more balanced too.


thank you so much, i'm amazed, it didn't even occurred to me the stuff about starch and the way it affects the intestine.
what do you think about quinoa, please?
what are "fermented grains"?
thank you for sharing :) :) :)
Posted by: santina, Tuesday, March 4, 2014, 9:58am; Reply: 7
sorry i forgot ::) ::) ::)

i would be grateful if you could tell me more on buckwheat too, sorrysorryandthanks
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, March 4, 2014, 3:34pm; Reply: 8
I enjoyed reading this little history of amaranth and some of its relatives! I especially enjoy chard and beets so I was happy to know that they are all related:
http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=dailytip&dbid=231
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Tuesday, March 4, 2014, 3:52pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from aussielady582
if you have strong healthy digestion, then mixing of grains may be ok, for others, I'd suggest not mixing grains/starches as is more work for the system and the digestive enzymes.
Also, if a person has damaged gut lining (small intestine), then I would not advise amaranth, due to the starch and the way it affects the villi on the surface of the intestine, which can be erroded over a long period of time, leading to food intolerance and auto-immune disease.  If you are feeling well and have no symptoms or digestive problems, then maybe amaranth is fine, but for others, I'd say not to eat it until health has improved, and then, maybe fermented grains may be easier to digest.
I'm grain free for now, and don't miss them at all, not even rice which I kept eating and found hard to give up. I think the taste buds start to get healthier & more balanced too.


I thought Dr D recomends amaranth for digestive issue, perhaps Lola will provide a link
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Tuesday, March 4, 2014, 3:54pm; Reply: 10
http://www.dadamo.com/B2blogs/blogs/index.php?blog=27&s=amaranth&sentence=AND&submit=Search
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, March 4, 2014, 8:35pm; Reply: 11
Recipe sounds delish!
Posted by: ginnyTN, Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 8:01pm; Reply: 12
Perhaps aussielady582 meant sprouted grains, which are definitely easier to digest.

I know you can ferment grains also, as in making tempeh.  

Sometimes our across-country terminology can become confusing, eh?  
Posted by: aussielady582, Thursday, March 6, 2014, 5:26am; Reply: 13
Hello santina, the issue with starch won't necesarily affect everyone, it depends on how a person's digestive system is working & how sensitive a person is to starch in food, I think the starch will only cause a problem when there is imbalance, such as when things slow down or when toxicity builds up, or when bacterial flora is out of balance as in dysbiosis or overgrowth / candida problems, which then gives the starch a chance to damage the intestinal wall. If your system is working well including your elimination / bowel habits, then you would not need to worry, as amaranth seeds are considered a whole grain and do contain some nutrients and moisture.  Processed & refined starches cause more problems I think, than whole grains like brown rice. I think rice and amaranth make a nice combination, I think I did try this once in the past.
I also don't know if any studies have been done on amaranth/quinoa and their starch, and if it is a good idea to eat them all throughout the year, I've thought of checking to see how the people where amaranth is native, to find out if they eat the seeds all throughout the year, or just when it is harvested - ie in season.
I like amaranth seeds myself, and used to have it for breakfast, sometimes mixed in a little quinoa, and served warm with fruit, maybe flax seed or almonds, pine nuts. Spices add more flavour and aid digestion too.
I think it good to have some fats either in seeds/nuts, or some ghee, as this may offer some protection to the intestines to keep moisture, so that starches don't affect the villi, not sure what others think.  Amaranth seeds cooked in water or some liquid with some ghee would be fine for most people.  I did meet a lady about 2 yrs ago, who stopped eating quinoa as she felt she did not digest it well, she was no longer eating any grains.
Yes, do soak and rinse the quinoa well before cooking, to reduce the saponin content, & to ensure you get all the nutrients digested well.
Fermented grains are pre-digested, and so easier to digest for people who may have weak digestion or some type of intestinal disorder, one way of fermenting is to add kefir whey and let the seeds sit at room temperature for a few days, there are recipes in books and possibly on the 'net about fermenting grains/seeds.
I only have experience with cooking/eating the little seeds, so can't speak for other parts of the amaranth plant. Take care, and best regards.
Print page generated: Saturday, October 25, 2014, 6:15pm