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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Re-Inventing Mexican Cornbread?
Posted by: BluesSinger, Tuesday, January 28, 2014, 9:33pm
Anyone have a clue on how we could re-invent this recipe maybe using Millet, Turkey Bacon, compliant oil, and compliant cheese?

The big mysteries to me would be what to use for the can of cream style corn, the buttermilk, and would Millet work?

Original Recipe
Mexican Cornbread

10 Slices Bacon
1-1/2 Cups Yellow Cornmeal
1 Tbsp Baking powder
1-1/4 tsp salt
1 8.25 can cream style corn
1 cup buttermilk
1/4 cup veg oil
2 large eggs
2 jalapeño peppers, seeded and finely chopped
8 oz cheddar cheese, grated and divided

1)  preheat oven to 400.  Arrange bacon slices in crisscross pattern in bottom of 10-1/2 x 2" cast iron skillet.  Place skillet in oven for 15-20 min or until bacon drippings evenly cover the bottom of the skillet.

2)  Tilt skillet to distribute drippings evenly.  (Drippings will prevent cornbread from sticking).

3)  Whisk together cornmeal, baking powder, and salt in a large bowl, set aside.

4)  Whisk together corn soup and next 3 ingredients; stir into cornmeal mixture.  Stir in peppers and 1-1/2 cups cheese until just blended.  Spoon batter into skillet.  Bake at 400 for 25 min.

5)  Remove from oven; sprinkle remaining cheese over bread.  Bake 10 min until cheese melts and bread is golden.  Remove from oven to wire rack;  let stand 10 min.  Loosen edges and sides of pan with metal spatula;  flip bread onto serving plate.  Let stand for 5 min before serving.

Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Tuesday, January 28, 2014, 9:48pm; Reply: 1
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipedepictor7x.cgi?114

Try this one. I'd just replace the spelt with more millet flour or another compatible flour.
Posted by: deblynn3, Tuesday, January 28, 2014, 9:50pm; Reply: 2
I use millet and amaranth flour, and a TB of amaranth seeds for the crush you get from cornmeal. BD just uses millet both seem to do fine.  Colby cheese as a natural for me on Swami and that would be what I could use for the cheddar cheese. I would just leave out the corn which is sweet, and replace with sweet red pepper to balance the jalapeño peppers
Posted by: BluesSinger, Tuesday, January 28, 2014, 10:18pm; Reply: 3
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipedepictor7x.cgi?114

Try this one. I'd just replace the spelt with more millet flour or another compatible flour.


can't do yogurt  or buttermilk.. hummm.. almond milk? oat milk?
Posted by: Dianne, Tuesday, January 28, 2014, 10:25pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from BluesSinger


can't do yogurt  or buttermilk.. hummm.. almond milk? oat milk?


I use almond or rice milk to replace milk in any recipe and I curdle it by adding lemon juice, In the past I would use apple cider vinegar to curdle. This sounds great and the suggestion to add red peppers in place of the creamed corn is a good one. :)

Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Tuesday, January 28, 2014, 11:11pm; Reply: 5
Yep, red pimento peppers were in the recipe that I linked.
Posted by: san j, Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 12:20am; Reply: 6
These sound like interesting breads.
But are they re-inventions of Mexican Corn Bread?
Really?

I've frankly never found anything to simulate Corn-y flavor.

But -- Creativity in the Kitchen is fun, too.  :)
Posted by: Lloyd, Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 1:20am; Reply: 7
Quoted from san j


I've frankly never found anything to simulate Corn-y flavor.

But -- Creativity in the Kitchen is fun, too.  :)


Perhaps Job's tears might be incorporated..... (think)
Posted by: ginnyTN, Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 2:44am; Reply: 8
A friend of mine has gone through a couple gluten free periods.  She always uses at least 3 kinds of gluten free flour (one being millet) plus arrowroot or tapioca flour in a recipe because it helps the finished product stay together without having to add any kind of gum.

To me, everything she makes when she is in her gluten free phases (even cup cakes) tastes a bit like corn bread.  But I was never a corn lover, except for Italian polenta and I have found that I can make fantastic polenta from millet, so I'm happy!  
Posted by: aussielady582, Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 2:44am; Reply: 9
was wondering if almond meal/flour and nutritional yeast would work, sometimes it is a matter of just experimenting with a smaller quantity and see how it turns out. I think millet may work, or amaranth.
Posted by: ginnyTN, Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 2:56am; Reply: 10
When I first started on the BTD I tried making "cornbread" with a delicious recipe that used yogurt and eggs.  I substituted millet for the corn meal.  It looked lovely until you touched it.  Then it immediately disintegrated into crumbs!!!!

That's why I posted above about my friend's use of at least 3 different gluten free flours.  
Posted by: aussielady582, Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 3:05am; Reply: 11
yes, I had the same problem sometimes in the past, I did make nice pancakes one day but can't remember what I used, I think it was millet flour with something else.  Also, on Fran's House of Ayurveda cooking website, I tried a recipe for some corn like muffins - the ingredients are changed depending on a person's type of constitution. they turned out quite nice, but I haven't made any for a while as I am not wanting to consume much sweeteners at present, even the powdered ones or stevia wich makes me feel a bit sick.  Using different flours probably will give best results.
Posted by: san j, Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 3:47am; Reply: 12
Yeah, only Corn tastes like corn.

Kin'a like Peanuts in that way: Uniqueness.
Posted by: ABJoe, Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 4:47am; Reply: 13
Quoted from san j
Yeah, only Corn tastes like corn.

Kin'a like Peanuts in that way: Uniqueness.

Most foods have a unique flavor.  We trade one food for another, but don't ever get the exact same flavor...  Just one of the challenges with cutting some foods out of the diet to get the better health reward.
Posted by: san j, Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 6:11am; Reply: 14
Quoted from ABJoe

Most foods have a unique flavor.  We trade one food for another, but don't ever get the exact same flavor...  Just one of the challenges with cutting some foods out of the diet to get the better health reward.

Of course.
Some, however, are harder to duplicate than others, for their very distinct flavors.
If a person really likes a certain food, s/he might be expected to like certain other foods for some similar quality. But that doesn't mean the original food has been "re-invented"; it only means a pleasing replacement has been found.

Perfect example:
I've enjoyed very thinly sliced nectarine on greek yogurt or goat cheese over a cracker during heirloom tomato season. It totally scratches the tomato-itch, ABJoe. But I've by no means "re-invented the tomato".  ;)

Posted by: jayneeo, Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 6:23am; Reply: 15
to me, amaranth comes closest to corn.
(hm, I like the nectarine idea)
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, January 29, 2014, 7:30am; Reply: 16
quinoa and millet, to me
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