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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  rye bread ?
Posted by: Exahab, Monday, January 20, 2014, 4:44pm
I have been following the blood type diet and have noticed that rye is allowed for type o when gluten is not.

Doesn't rye contain gluten?  Why is this allowance made for this food to be neutral?

A little help for a newbie please
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, January 20, 2014, 5:03pm; Reply: 1
Yes, rye is allowed, even though it contains gluten. Spelt is also acceptable for O secretors, even though it, too, contains gluten.

When a whole food is listed in the food lists, the entire food, as a unit, has been evaluated. That means the whole food is OK, and that any "bad things" about some of its component parts are outweighed by any "good things" in other component parts.

The "gluten" listed as an "Avoid" in the food lists refers to isolated wheat gluten, sold as a baking additive, and often added to processed foods (such as meat substitutes and baked goods.) That form of gluten, often listed simply as "gluten" is problematic.

The gluten component of spelt and rye, when consumed as part of the whole food, is compliant for Os on the Blood Type Diet. However, it's still problematic for somebody with Celiac Disease. People of any blood type need to avoid gluten-containing foods if they have Celiac Disease.

Similarly, you will find "fructose" as an avoid for Os, even though many fructose-containing fruits are acceptable. That's because "fructose" by itself refers to the processed sugar, often corn-based, that's used as a sweetener or food additive. When it's part of honey or fruit or fruit juice, the fructose has already been factored in when rating the whole food.
Posted by: Exahab, Monday, January 20, 2014, 5:36pm; Reply: 2
Thanks

I have not been diagnosed with celiac.  I have considered myself gluten intolerant due to the changes my body undergoes after eating gluten, such as oils and odor with skin etc.
I am trying diet to determine if I am intolerant to certain foods or gluten itself.
Posted by: ABJoe, Monday, January 20, 2014, 5:44pm; Reply: 3
Quoted from Exahab
I have considered myself gluten intolerant due to the changes my body undergoes after eating gluten, such as oils and odor with skin etc.
I am trying diet to determine if I am intolerant to certain foods or gluten itself.

It is possible that you are having a problem with the wheat lectin, rather than the gluten.  

Watch out for most gluten-free commercial products, however, as many of then contain corn, potato or some other avoid which may have negative effects that are as bad or worse than the gluten product you are trying to avoid during the test period...
Posted by: Jane, Monday, January 20, 2014, 6:52pm; Reply: 4
Please note that most commercially made rye breads contain wheat.  There are some small cocktail ryes that are 100% rye - you really have to read labels.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, January 20, 2014, 8:04pm; Reply: 5
It won't hurt you to avoid spelt, rye, and oats, along with the rest of the BTD. You can test yourself on 100% rye bread or crackers later, and see if you actually have a problem with gluten, or if the problem was with wheat (if that was the source of  gluten you ate in the past.)
Posted by: Loops, Sunday, January 26, 2014, 11:56am; Reply: 6
of course YMMV, but I get eczema coming back on my finger after eating 100% rye bread, with no barley extract added etc.  I get rye bread as a neutral on my Swami but alas it is not.  The same thing happens with brewer's yeast tablets so it is definitely the gluten.  I seem to be fine with marmite though which is odd as that is yeast extract spread - that is a black dot for me but it seems alright.  I would do what Ruthie said - avoid all gluten for awhile then test out 100% rye bread.  I am not celiac btw but have had terrible eczema in the past from eating gluten - the worst offender being wheat.
Posted by: shoulderblade, Sunday, January 26, 2014, 12:46pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from Jane
Please note that most commercially made rye breads contain wheat.  There are some small cocktail ryes that are 100% rye - you really have to read labels.

I would go with "Please note that all commercially made rye breads contain wheat. Unless it is 100% Rye bread it will have wheat content both as a cheaper filler and for the gluten.

Again .... read the label.


Posted by: ginnyTN, Sunday, January 26, 2014, 11:55pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from Loops
of course YMMV, but I get eczema coming back on my finger after eating 100% rye bread, with no barley extract added etc.  I get rye bread as a neutral on my Swami but alas it is not.  The same thing happens with brewer's yeast tablets so it is definitely the gluten.  I seem to be fine with marmite though which is odd as that is yeast extract spread - that is a black dot for me but it seems alright.  I would do what Ruthie said - avoid all gluten for awhile then test out 100% rye bread.  I am not celiac btw but have had terrible eczema in the past from eating gluten - the worst offender being wheat.


It is possible that even though the label says 100% rye, there could be cross contamination from other types of bread baked in the same facility and you could be getting gluten that way.  This is one more reason to make all your own food from whole ingredients.  

I do have one friend (an O) who is extremely gluten sensitive and she trusts products that are labeled "gluten free", so far with no ill effects.  She will not buy anything at all that is not labeled "gluten free" and is always careful to read the small print that often says something like, "processed in a facility that also handles.......whatever......"    

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