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BTD Forums  /  SWAMI Xpress  /  SWAMI, Why not for kids?
Posted by: Hassanna, Sunday, November 17, 2013, 7:28pm
Hello,
I believe I understand that SWAMI is contraindicated to use on children under the age of 13-15 or until they have stopped growing.  Is this true?  And why is it so?

It seems that one should be able to use the program for children and when changes occur to the child, one can change the information in the individualized SWAMI program.    

Any insight would be greatly appreciated.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Sunday, November 17, 2013, 7:57pm; Reply: 1
Both SWAMI and GTD (genotype diet, aka "change your genetic destiny") may change as the child  grows, since both SWAMI and GTD work based on the ratios of various body measurements, and children's growth isn't always even. Meanwhile, a child's blood type  isn't going to change. Most of the time, it's adequate to put children on the BTD (blood type diet) until they're done  growing.

However, some kids don't thrive on BTD. One woman put her young child on the Explorer Diet because he was allergic to many of the beneficial foods for his blood type. Another member bought a SWAMI for his preschool aged daughter because she had some health issues that weren't clearing up on BTD alone. They keep updating SWAMI with her new measurements as needed. It's been several years, and both of those children seem to be doing very well, based on what their parents have posted.

So, it's not "contra-indicated" to put young children on SWAMI, it's just not usually necessary. Healthy kids may not get much benefit with SWAMI over BTD, but kids with special health challenges can benefit greatly.
Posted by: Lola, Monday, November 18, 2013, 3:12am; Reply: 2
Quoted Text
Dr D
    Actually they probably benefit from whatever current GT they happen to be, even if the
eventually morph into another one.

    As for kids, the best thing is to get the possible GTs from blood type, then strength test
each against the other. Finally, use a little intuition, once you get a feel for each type.


Can children be Genotyped?
http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1205923297
Posted by: SquarePeg, Monday, November 18, 2013, 3:49am; Reply: 3
Quoted from ruthiegirl
Both SWAMI and GTD (genotype diet, aka "change your genetic destiny") may change as the child  grows, since both SWAMI and GTD work based on the ratios of various body measurements, and children's growth isn't always even. Meanwhile, a child's blood type  isn't going to change. Most of the time, it's adequate to put children on the BTD (blood type diet) until they're done  growing.

However, some kids don't thrive on BTD. One woman put her young child on the Explorer Diet because he was allergic to many of the beneficial foods for his blood type. Another member bought a SWAMI for his preschool aged daughter because she had some health issues that weren't clearing up on BTD alone. They keep updating SWAMI with her new measurements as needed. It's been several years, and both of those children seem to be doing very well, based on what their parents have posted.

So, it's not "contra-indicated" to put young children on SWAMI, it's just not usually necessary. Healthy kids may not get much benefit with SWAMI over BTD, but kids with special health challenges can benefit greatly.
Very thorough response, ruthiegirl.  From reading your second paragraph I wonder whether the SWAMI Explorer diet is effective for children with autism or ADD.  And if so, how closely might it resemble or overlap other recommended diets, such as GFCF, Feingold, etc.  But this strays far from the original topic....

Posted by: Hassanna, Tuesday, November 19, 2013, 6:28pm; Reply: 4
These are great answers, thank you!  I wanted both my girls to take the secretor test so I could gain a little more information.

For clarity, is secretor status like blood type in that it doesn't change over a lifetime?
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, November 19, 2013, 6:39pm; Reply: 5
Correct. Secretor status is present at birth and remains the  same throughout the person's lifetime (although I don't know how you'd be able to collect saliva from an infant...)
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