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Posted by: bluedragoon, Wednesday, October 23, 2013, 1:22pm
would like to know if anyone can give me info on baking soda and the amount of sodium bicarbonate that is in it. for example one teaspoon of baking soda in water is 1200 mg-
my question is can potassium bicarbonate be used in it's place? is there a baking soda that has less sodium bicarbonate? what is the difference in baking soda and baking powder?
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, October 23, 2013, 1:39pm; Reply: 1
Baking soda is sodium bicarbonate. It's a base- and will create bubbles when mixed with acidic ingredients (such as cocoa powder, lemon juice, or buttermilk.) Baking powder is a mixture of sodium bicarbonate plus a few other ingredients, including something acidic, so that it will create bubbles in a dough as soon as water is added, so you don't need an acid in the recipe.

My box of baking soda says there is 160 mg of sodium per 1/8 teaspoon serving. I do not know if potassium bicarbonate works the same way or not.

Most "baking powders" out there contain corn starch, and many also contain aluminum. I use 1/2 teaspoon baking soda and 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar as an alternative to 1 teaspoon baking powder. Some people use a different proportion of baking soda/cream of tartar.
Posted by: ABJoe, Wednesday, October 23, 2013, 2:26pm; Reply: 2
Quoted from bluedragoon
would like to know if anyone can give me info on baking soda and the amount of sodium bicarbonate that is in it. for example one teaspoon of baking soda in water is 1200 mg-
my question is can potassium bicarbonate be used in it's place? is there a baking soda that has less sodium bicarbonate? what is the difference in baking soda and baking powder?

Sodium and Potassium are interchangeable in most compounds - such as sodium or potassium iodide and sodium or potassium bicarbonate.  The difference is simply what the base salt of the compound is.  If you need a very sodium restricted diet, then the potassium base is a better choice, although the sodium / potassium balance is part of what regulates the flow of liquid in and out of the cell, so you don't want to go too heavy in either direction...

Here is a chart that discusses the substitution:
Quoted Text


Ruth answered the questions about baking soda / powder, so I won't repeat it.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, October 23, 2013, 7:47pm; Reply: 3
http://www.bing.com/search?cp=1252&FORM=FREESS&q=baking+soda&q1=site%3Adadamo.com
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