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BTD Forums  /  SWAMI Xpress  /  Jasmine rice
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, October 8, 2013, 4:56pm
I have "rice, white" and "rice, brown" in the "neutral" column, and "rice, basmati" as a beneficial. I normally buy basmati rice at Costco,  but they were out the last time I went shopping. So I  bought rice in Trader Joe's this week instead, and the jasmine rice was significantly less expensive than the basmati rice.

Does the "jasmine" rice fall into the "rice, white" category or the "rice, basmati" category? What is it about basmati rice that makes it so different from "regular" rice?
Posted by: Chloe, Tuesday, October 8, 2013, 5:17pm; Reply: 1
http://www.thekitchn.com/whats-the-difference-between-j-1-93814

DH has jasmine rice as a toxin and basmati as a beneficial and I'm almost certain it's due to the
glycemic impact of jasmine which is twice as high as basmati.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, October 8, 2013, 5:48pm; Reply: 2
Thanks for the info!

I don't have jasmine rice listed in my SWAMI at all. That's why I wasn't sure.

I think I'll use up the 3 lb bag I just bought, but I won't buy it again.
Posted by: ginnyTN, Tuesday, October 8, 2013, 10:44pm; Reply: 3
The fact that both basmati and jasmine rice have very distinctive smells and tastes means they have a different chemical composition from "regular" rice, so it is possible that one kind could be a neutral or even an avoid whereas another could be beneficial.  

Perhaps part of the glycemic index problem with the jasmine rice is that most people use the white version of it.  I use brown jasmine rice.  It still has that heavenly sweet smell and almost sweet taste but should have a lot lower glycemic index because of being a whole grain.

I always try to buy only organic rice.  
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Thursday, October 10, 2013, 6:35pm; Reply: 4
Slightly off-topic but a related note:  brown basmati and white basmati are significantly different, glycemic index-wise and starch-wise, me thinks.  I base this on the fact that the white is VERY starchy and cooks up WAY faster than the brown, to a pasty consistency.  The brown is higher in fiber (though still cooks up to a very lovely, soft consistency), taking longer to cook and not turning out as starchy/pasty.  Brown basmati is my staple grain--LOVE it.

Anyway, sorry for the topic veer, but just thought I'd point out that, even within the basmati rice spectrum, there is a significant diff twixt the white and the brown, in my opinion.  The brown is the one that is better for us, though the white is still acceptable.

As for jasmine, that's a horse of a different color.  It is not the same as basmati, that's all I know.
Posted by: Chloe, Thursday, October 10, 2013, 6:47pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from Peppermint Twist
Slightly off-topic but a related note:  brown basmati and white basmati are significantly different, glycemic index-wise and starch-wise, me thinks.  I base this on the fact that the white is VERY starchy and cooks up WAY faster than the brown, to a pasty consistency.  The brown is higher in fiber (though still cooks up to a very lovely, soft consistency), taking longer to cook and not turning out as starchy/pasty.  Brown basmati is my staple grain--LOVE it.

Anyway, sorry for the topic veer, but just thought I'd point out that, even within the basmati rice spectrum, there is a significant diff twixt the white and the brown, in my opinion.  The brown is the one that is better for us, though the white is still acceptable.

As for jasmine, that's a horse of a different color.  It is not the same as basmati, that's all I know.


Good points....brown rice takes way longer to cook than white rice of all types and white rice
is starchy but I've found some short grain brown rices to be sticky and starchy....  Just did a search and realized Lundberg makes a brown jasmine rice.  Didn't realize it could be purchased as a abrown rice. It's got a heavenly aroma...but so does basmati.  Rice is so good!  :)


Posted by: ruthiegirl, Thursday, October 10, 2013, 6:54pm; Reply: 6
I'm happy with the white basmati I usually get from Costco. Basmati is a beneficial on my SWAMI, and Jack prefers having white rice. He has a tendency to *not eat* if he doesn't like what I've prepared, and then his blood sugar plummets and he turns into a little monster (who's not so little anymore.) White rice also cooks up faster and therefore works better on busy nights.

It just threw me off when I was *out* of rice (not just low) and Costco didn't have any on the shelf. So I picked up what was affordable at Trader Joe's. The basmati (brown or white) at Trader Joe's is about triple the price of buying it at Costco!
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Friday, October 11, 2013, 6:17pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from ruthiegirl
White rice also cooks up faster and therefore works better on busy nights.

Ruthie, I use the brown basmati but, what I do to save lots of cooking time is, I boil me up a big ole' batch of it (usually also containing some broccoli slaw--julienned broc and carrot--onion, and spices) and keep it in the fridge, so that all I have to do is give it a quick heat-up/stir-fry in a skillet, along with whatever protein I'm having.  Here in FL, it also makes for good cold rice salads (for example, like those pasta and tuna salads you see, only with rice and canned salmon instead) on hot days.

Sarah Blakeney was the one who suggested that I keep a batch of cooked rice in the fridge.  Such a simple thing, yet SO helpful and practical.  Her influence is still felt and appreciated.

Posted by: Chloe, Friday, October 11, 2013, 6:45pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from Peppermint Twist

Ruthie, I use the brown basmati but, what I do to save lots of cooking time is, I boil me up a big ole' batch of it (usually also containing some broccoli slaw--julienned broc and carrot--onion, and spices) and keep it in the fridge, so that all I have to do is give it a quick heat-up/stir-fry in a skillet, along with whatever protein I'm having.  Here in FL, it also makes for good cold rice salads (for example, like those pasta and tuna salads you see, only with rice and canned salmon instead) on hot days.

Sarah Blakeney was the one who suggested that I keep a batch of cooked rice in the fridge.  Such a simple thing, yet SO helpful and practical.  Her influence is still felt and appreciated.




Does anyone realize that rice consuming countries  soak their rice and all grains the way we soak our beans? I was watching a youtube video where a Cuban woman was showing
how she makes black bean soup....and she happened to mention that in China, Japan and most
of Latin America soaks their rice.  We don't and I'm not sure if we should. It's supposed to reduce
phytic acid and make grains more digestible as they slightly sprout.  The book Nourishing Traditions clearly explains sprouting of grains.

Just mentioning Sarah's name, PT makes me smile while also bringing tears to my eyes. Sarah's
energy radiated so far and wide on this forum.  Still miss reading her wonderful posts.  She
had a fighting spirit that was profoundly touching....Do you keep in touch with her husband?

Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, October 11, 2013, 7:50pm; Reply: 9
PT- if I was just cooking for myself, I'd do that, but it's not practical when I'm cooking for a whole family; not when you take into account the size of my fridge.   Sometimes I do cook too much and then I will reheat the leftovers, but meal planning is generally easier when I make dinner from scratch each night. Sometimes leftover rice burns because it heats up in WAY less time than it does to cook the meat- or I put it up too late (so it won't burn) and then it's  cold when dinner is ready.

I do sometimes keep cooked rice in the house, so I can make "rice and beans" for Jack for a quick lunch, but I still like to make it fresh at dinnertime.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Monday, October 14, 2013, 6:31pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from Chloe
Does anyone realize that rice consuming countries  soak their rice and all grains the way we soak our beans? I was watching a youtube video where a Cuban woman was showing
how she makes black bean soup....and she happened to mention that in China, Japan and most
of Latin America soaks their rice.  We don't and I'm not sure if we should. It's supposed to reduce
phytic acid and make grains more digestible as they slightly sprout.  The book Nourishing Traditions clearly explains sprouting of grains.

Very interesting, Ruthie, especially in light of the recent scary news stories about arsenic in rice.  It is scary to me because brown basmati rice is a staple for me--I eat it almost every day.  They say that rinsing your rice off before cooking helps reduce the arsenic load.  So I would guess soaking would also help, plus that is so interesting that it slightly sprouts the rice.
Quoted Text
Just mentioning Sarah's name, PT makes me smile while also bringing tears to my eyes. Sarah's energy radiated so far and wide on this forum.  Still miss reading her wonderful posts.  She
had a fighting spirit that was profoundly touching....Do you keep in touch with her husband?

She was one of the best friends I ever had, even though we never met in person, and she made quite a lasting impression on me.  I have not been in touch with David in years, and I hope he and Joe, and Sarah's sisters, parents and all her loved ones are doing very well.

Posted by: jayneeo, Monday, October 14, 2013, 7:45pm; Reply: 11
basmati rice is higher in protein, bringing glycemic balance. (relatively)
Posted by: Dreamer266, Sunday, July 6, 2014, 5:36pm; Reply: 12
Should we be concerned about eating brown rice? Does it contain alot of arsenic?
Posted by: maukik, Sunday, July 6, 2014, 7:06pm; Reply: 13
White basmati and white jasmine get too mushy when soaked and I read that it isn't necessary to soak them. I still soak both for about 10 minutes. Brown rices, I always soak for the recommended time per Nourishing Traditions.
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