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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Bone broth
Posted by: Tami, Tuesday, October 1, 2013, 9:49pm
What kinds can I make?

Where are the best receipe's?

Im assuming none will be for me, as a quick internet search didnt show any Turkey broths. I shouldnt have anything from a cow, and Im AB so no chicken. I really want to do this for my baby boy B+ so no chicken, and I think beef may be best, though my older child may want chicken broth later on. She is A+
Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, October 1, 2013, 10:02pm; Reply: 1
:)try recipe center under support, above
Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, October 1, 2013, 10:54pm; Reply: 2
Quoted from Tami
What kinds can I make?

Where are the best receipe's?

Im assuming none will be for me, as a quick internet search didnt show any Turkey broths. I shouldnt have anything from a cow, and Im AB so no chicken. I really want to do this for my baby boy B+ so no chicken, and I think beef may be best, though my older child may want chicken broth later on. She is A+

For the AB and B, both can use beef, lamb, and turkey broth.  The beef meat doesn't digest well for the A and AB, but the broth isn't going to hurt, as beef is lectin free.

The chicken lectin migrates from the meat or bone into the broth, so you don't want to use the chicken for B or AB...

You really don't need a recipe - other than cover the bones with water and cook for long time...  Some people add an acidic juice like lemon or lime to assist in dissolving some of the mineral from the bone, but is not necessary.  You can add vegetables and spices to the broth when it is almost finished or after the bones have been filtered out of the finished broth...
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, October 2, 2013, 12:38pm; Reply: 3
Any bones can be put into a crock pot or pot and left to simmer for 8-48 hours. Make sure it doesn't boil down and burn- you may need to add more water for longer cooking times. The longer it cooks, the more nutrients leave the bones and enter the broth. I usually add onions, garlic, ginger, and carrot peelings (saved from when I peel carrots for other cooking.)I sometimes also add peppercorns and other herbs, such as parsley or dill. I strain the broth and discard all the solids- they're "overcooked" and flavorless by then.

Adding an acid (such as vinegar or lemon juice) towards the beginning of the cooking time helps the minerals leach out of the bones faster.

I usually roast meat first, serve it, then save the bones for soup afterwards. More rarely I'll buy raw bones for soup. I like to buy a whole turkey (small) about once a month so I have lots of bones for soup- one turkey makes 2-3 big pots of soup.
Posted by: walk_the_walk, Wednesday, October 2, 2013, 5:23pm; Reply: 4
Tami, hello

Turkey broth - Just a suggestion, but worth a try as turkey drumsticks are very economically priced and this way, you get masses of wonderful moist meat - cooked and ready to eat to store in the fridge for snacks, salads, etc  AND a healthy clear turkey broth: -

1. You need a large casserole dish with a tight fitting lid. Depending on the size, will dictate whether you get 1,2,3 or 4 (or more drumsticks into the pot).

2. Remove the skin from the raw drumsticks. (This is really important or your broth will turn out with a slick of fat on the surface which needs more dealing with)

3. I put a good spoonful of Organic Swiss Bouillon into the casserole (it has parsley, turmeric, etc) and pour over a kettle full of just boiled water. (They don't need drowning, or your stock will be watery)

4. Cover and place in a hot oven. Depending on how many you're doing, and whether or not they were fridge cold - all you really want to do is to get the temperature up to boiling - as soon as you're there, turn the temperature down to 200-200F - and leave for 2 hours.

5.Check at 2 hours - you might want to turn them over and pop back in for up to another couple of hours. When they are ready, the gristly knuckle end will have shrunk towards the meaty end. At this point, remove from oven. Set to cool with the lid still on.

6. When cooled lift the drums out of the stock and drain for a few mins - the meat should be falling off the bone in moist chunks - there are quite a few tendons which need to be pulled away - but much easier to this way than by roasting the drumsticks.

UK turkey drumsticks are normally about 1.5 -2 lbs a piece - after the skin, bones and tendons are removed, you still get a goodly portion of lovely moist meat and  clear, non-greasy broth for soups.

Give it a try, any questions, just ask
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Thursday, October 3, 2013, 1:20pm; Reply: 5
I usually cook the meat first (drumsticks, thighs, half breast, whatever) then use the pre-roasted bones for soup. I don't really like the taste of  boiled meat, so by roasting first, the meat isn't wasted.
Posted by: Tami, Thursday, October 3, 2013, 2:35pm; Reply: 6
If I were to put it in the crock pot, and remove the meat after its cooked, would the meat come off easiest? We dont mind cooking meat this way, everyone seems to like it. My daughter wont eat anything cooked in the nuwave (picky). She says its too dry, but its juicy, she's just picky. I think she would love some turkey to snack on, as would everyone else beside me.
Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, October 3, 2013, 4:14pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from Tami
If I were to put it in the crock pot, and remove the meat after its cooked, would the meat come off easiest?

The longer the meat cooks, the more tender it will be, until it just falls off the bone (and apart)...  We do this with turkey drumsticks when we want to have a "pulled pork" substitute.
Posted by: walk_the_walk, Thursday, October 3, 2013, 10:01pm; Reply: 8
I also make soup from bones which have been cooked first and the meat removed (as RuthieG advises)

My point is that to get a clear broth / stock you must use raw meat/bones/carcasses. Cooked bones produce a cloudy broth, especially when re-boiled with root vegetables.

At the end of the day, you have a couple of different options - see what works best for you...it's all part of the journey to health - we're all individuals (dance)
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, October 8, 2013, 12:14am; Reply: 9
My bone stock is made from the knuckle bones of grass-fed cattle that I buy at my local butcher.

I cover a baseball-sized bone with water in a deep, narrow pot, bring to a boil and the lower heat to simmer.  It cooks, covered for at least 8 hours.  Then, I remove the bone, strain the liquid into a wide mouth glass jar (I've learned to use the amount of water that yields a quart or so of broth), and chill.  The solid layer of fat can be easily lifted off and discarded.  The finished stock is a solid gel, like jello, which I use in making soup or stew.
Posted by: Tami, Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 5:18pm; Reply: 10
I tried using the crock pot, but I had major issues arise and wound up causing two of my outlets damage and now they do not work. I only plugged it into one, but I think they were connected. Somehow the plug was stuck too close to the rim of the cooker and it melted. So I bought the exact same model and threw out the base to the 1st one.

The meat was good, everyone loved the dark meat with a little sea salt. As for the broth, I havent gotten used to the plain taste, but I am able to puree Ryan's spinach with about 4 oz of broth and 2 oz of apple sauce or apple juice. He drinks it right down. I plan to try other things, just havent planned what yet.

I keep checking for different options of bones/meat at the store.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 5:23pm; Reply: 11
If Ryan's getting 4 ounces of bone broth a day, along with greens, then he's probably getting all the minerals he needs and doesn't need any "milk" or milk substitute.

I rarely drink "plain broth." I use it as a  base for gravy, or as the liquid in a soup.
Posted by: Tami, Wednesday, October 9, 2013, 5:50pm; Reply: 12
What a good idea, while I need to find a homeade oatmeal receipe I can use at work I may look for some kind of vegetable soup. I have the base ready to go lol.
Posted by: ginnyTN, Sunday, October 13, 2013, 9:46pm; Reply: 13
BEST - DETAILED - RECIPE I've seen for bone broth (stock) is here:

http://thedomesticman.com/?s=chicken+stock&submit=Search

You can use ANY KIND of bones in place of the chicken, as long as they have teeny bits of meat still attached.  You can even make mixed bone stock (broth).

I do a lot of batch cooking, and broth/stock is ideal for "my way" of doing things.  Who cares how long it takes to make if I wind up with enough for a whole bunch of incredibly delicious and healthy future meals   ?!?   :K)

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