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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  "Mexican Cheeses Explained" Thread
Posted by: Seraffa, Monday, September 9, 2013, 7:28am
Please list here your knowledge on soft, hard, ripe and aged mexican cheeses and "crema" of every sort for the economy $$, delight and use for recipies that call for dairy.  :)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, September 9, 2013, 12:25pm; Reply: 1
I thought you were avoiding cheeses for a while?
Posted by: Seraffa, Monday, September 9, 2013, 4:34pm; Reply: 2
Quoted from ruthiegirl
I thought you were avoiding cheeses for a while?


This has nothing to do with me eating any cheese. It's because I live in a Tex-Mex society where only a couple major brands will say "fresh cheese" or "hard cheese" or "string cheese" FROM MEXICO, lots of other "in-between-looking cheeses" printed with no further explanation, or the rest of the labeling in Spanish, and store help with limited mental and linguistic talents to explain how said cheeses are made/used. All they will tell you is "it tastes good - try it."

I've always wanted Lola or other people to shed some light on those NUMEROUS cheeses out thereon the shelves that are affordable for folks to do their BT cooking with, but may not be sure which cheese is cultured in which way........
Posted by: chrissyA, Monday, September 9, 2013, 5:45pm; Reply: 3
I second the request! Anybody have the knowledge???(book2)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, September 9, 2013, 6:45pm; Reply: 4
Ah, got it. I thought you were asking for personal culinary use.

I'd suggest looking for recipes for "make your own" of the various kinds of cheeses and then compare them to the recipes for "make your own" paneer, cottage cheese, etc. that ARE listed on BTD/GTD/SWAMI.

I'd be willing to play online and look up recipes, and compare them to cheese-making recipes I've found for SWAMI-listed cheeses, if you post the Spanish names of the cheeses you're wondering about. I probably won't get to it until later this week, though, as Jack is due home from school in about 15 minutes and then my kids will need my attention for the rest of the afternoon and evening.
Posted by: Seraffa, Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 3:20am; Reply: 5
Quoted from ruthiegirl
Ah, got it. I thought you were asking for personal culinary use.

I'd suggest looking for recipes for "make your own" of the various kinds of cheeses and then compare them to the recipes for "make your own" paneer, cottage cheese, etc. that ARE listed on BTD/GTD/SWAMI.

I'd be willing to play online and look up recipes, and compare them to cheese-making recipes I've found for SWAMI-listed cheeses, if you post the Spanish names of the cheeses you're wondering about. I probably won't get to it until later this week, though, as Jack is due home from school in about 15 minutes and then my kids will need my attention for the rest of the afternoon and evening.


Ok; the list is more going to be for fun and education; nobody need stress; if we want to go cheese by cheese over a few days that's cool. Perhaps we'll learn some interesting things about Mexico too.
Posted by: Seraffa, Sunday, September 15, 2013, 3:28pm; Reply: 6
Añejo
Dry and salty, this cheese is generally sold pre-grated. Sprinkle on enchiladas, antojitos [small plates], and refried beans.
Substitution: Romano


---- OK - now we know it is an aged, hard cheese . BUT for SWAMI - there is a difference between who is allowed Parmesan and who is allowed Romano.

THIS is what I'm talking about. Who is allowed Anejo?  

Oh Lola.....(smartyp) where are you......come out, come out, Lola
Posted by: Seraffa, Sunday, September 15, 2013, 3:31pm; Reply: 7

Queso de Oaxaca
The "mozzarella of Mexico" (sold as quesillo in Oaxaca) is a ball of cheese created by rolling up broad skeins of cheese whose texture resembles that of string cheese. Shredded, it can top refried beans, tostadas, and soups. Sliced, it melts wonderfully for quesadillas or served with chile de agua. Small 1-inch balls are often eaten as snacks and enjoyed with a drink.
Substitutions: String cheese, mozzarella, domestic Muenster


---- Is it STRING CHEESE or is it MOZZARELLA culture  ??)
Posted by: Seraffa, Sunday, September 15, 2013, 3:37pm; Reply: 8

Queso Fresco
The name means "fresh cheese." In this case, it's a salty cheese that's usually enjoyed crumbled but can also be sliced or melted. Use it on refried beans, enchiladas, or stuffed in chiles.
Substitutions: Ricotta salata, French feta (milder and less salty than the Greek and Bulgarian varieties)
Recipe to try: Zucchini and Red Pepper Enchiladas with Two Salsas

I've tried it and it's tasteless like Ricotta Salata but not brined like Feta. IS THIS SALATA?  ??)




Queso Panela
Molded in a basket, this fresh cheese is sometimes sold as queso de canasta (canasta meaning basket). The unusual shape and textured exterior help distinguish this cheese—which is best enjoyed while still moist and fresh—from its counterparts.
Substitutions: Farmer's cheese, Monterey Jack


I have never seen this yet. Doesn't sound like a monterey jack at all, and doesn't sound like it would have the flavor of a Monterey Jack.  IS THIS FARMERS CHEESE   ??)
Posted by: Seraffa, Tuesday, September 17, 2013, 3:59pm; Reply: 9
Lola? (shrug)(whistle)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, September 17, 2013, 4:36pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from Seraffa

Queso Fresco
The name means "fresh cheese." In this case, it's a salty cheese that's usually enjoyed crumbled but can also be sliced or melted. Use it on refried beans, enchiladas, or stuffed in chiles.
Substitutions: Ricotta salata, French feta (milder and less salty than the Greek and Bulgarian varieties)
Recipe to try: Zucchini and Red Pepper Enchiladas with Two Salsas

I've tried it and it's tasteless like Ricotta Salata but not brined like Feta. IS THIS SALATA?  ??)
The instructions look to me like the instructions for making paneer.


Quoted Text


Queso Panela
Molded in a basket, this fresh cheese is sometimes sold as queso de canasta (canasta meaning basket). The unusual shape and textured exterior help distinguish this cheese—which is best enjoyed while still moist and fresh—from its counterparts.
Substitutions: Farmer's cheese, Monterey Jack


I have never seen this yet. Doesn't sound like a monterey jack at all, and doesn't sound like it would have the flavor of a Monterey Jack.  IS THIS FARMERS CHEESE   ??)
Farmer's cheese is made by culturing the milk then cooking it before straining. The recipe I found for this online (readable thanks to Google translate!) calls for using rennet plus calcium chloride to set it. Definitely NOT the equivalent of farmer's cheese, in terms of Dr D's food lists. I've gone through a bunch of the "how to make X cheese" from the cheeses listed in my SWAMI, and haven't yet had any luck. I seem to be finding soft cheeses that are curdled with lemon juice or lactobacteria (letting the milk culture) or there are cheeses made with rennet then aged. This is made with rennet then eaten fresh. I'll keep looking, though maybe not today.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, September 18, 2013, 12:53am; Reply: 11
I ve said bye bye to all, sorry

Añejo means aged

I still prefer an aged sheep s manchego or a pecorino romano anytime

besides cheese in general causes a subtle inflammatory reaction in my system
Posted by: Seraffa, Wednesday, September 18, 2013, 3:31am; Reply: 12
Quoted from ruthiegirl
The instructions look to me like the instructions for making paneer.


Farmer's cheese is made by culturing the milk then cooking it before straining. The recipe I found for this online (readable thanks to Google translate!) calls for using rennet plus calcium chloride to set it. Definitely NOT the equivalent of farmer's cheese, in terms of Dr D's food lists. I've gone through a bunch of the "how to make X cheese" from the cheeses listed in my SWAMI, and haven't yet had any luck. I seem to be finding soft cheeses that are curdled with lemon juice or lactobacteria (letting the milk culture) or there are cheeses made with rennet then aged. This is made with rennet then eaten fresh. I'll keep looking, though maybe not today.


That's okay Ruthie. I'll take up the slack; you're busy enough with the kids!
Posted by: Seraffa, Wednesday, September 18, 2013, 3:32am; Reply: 13
Quoted from Lola
I ve said bye bye to all, sorry

Añejo means aged

I still prefer an aged sheep s manchego or a pecorino romano anytime

besides cheese in general causes a subtle inflammatory reaction in my system


Aw! :( Ok.
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