Print Topic - Archive

BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Baking Powder or Baking Soda and why
Posted by: Kevinwp, Tuesday, August 20, 2013, 11:51pm
Hello,

I am going to be experimenting with creating different kinds of breads/tortillas and I would like to get some of your opinions about if you think it is better to bake with baking powder or baking soda and why?

Thank you
Posted by: C_Sharp, Wednesday, August 21, 2013, 12:50am; Reply: 1
The reason either product is used is to create bubbles of carbon dioxide.

Baking soda will not do this by itself. If using baking soda, you must add acid so the soda has something to react with and release carbon dioxide.

This can be anything that is acidic: lemon juice, molasses, buttermilk ...


Baking powder  contains soda with an acid so you do not have to add the acid.  Cream of tarter is commonly used in baking powder for the acid.

It does not matter which you use as long as you adjust the amount you put in a recipe (You need three times as much baking powder as soda) and include an acid if you are using baking soda.


Commercial baking powder may contain sodium aluminum sulfate and/or cornstarch. I try to avoid both of these ingredients.

Posted by: ginnyTN, Wednesday, August 21, 2013, 1:29am; Reply: 2
I do not trust any brand of commercial baking powder.  

There are several recipes on this web site for "baking powder" telling you how much soda and how much cream of tartar to use.  Personally I have found that 3/4 tsp. baking SODA plus 1 1/2 tsp. cream of tartar plus 1 tsp. of EITHER tapioca flour OR arrowroot powder makes the best "home made baking powder" and that combination is the equivalent of 1 TBS. commercial baking powder.

As C_sharp said, you do not have to use the cream of tartar but do have to use something acidic to get the bubbling raising action.

Happy baking!    (happy)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, August 21, 2013, 9:48pm; Reply: 3
1/2 teaspoon baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) plus 1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar equal 1  teaspoon baking powder (even though it's only 3/4 teaspoon of total volume.) If you want to make a lot ahead of time and just use in recipes calling for baking powder, you can add 1/4 teaspoon of a compliant starch to the blend.

It works just as well if you make it by the tablespoon or cup instead of by the teaspoon.

When typing up recipes for personal use, I convert the baking powder asked for into baking soda and cream of tartar. Any recipe I post on the TypeBase is the same; it will ask for a specified amount of baking soda and a specified amount of cream of tartar so you don't have to calculate it yourself.
Posted by: ginnyTN, Thursday, August 22, 2013, 12:17am; Reply: 4
Ruthiegirl,

Perhaps your amounts were a typo, but you reversed the percentages and listed 1 part cream of tartar to 2 parts baking soda.  

Sorry to disagree with you, but every recipe I've ever read specifies 1 part baking soda to 2 parts cream of tartar.  (book2)

I've made a LOT worse typos (like all the time) than that!  (dizzy)
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, August 22, 2013, 3:13am; Reply: 5
here ginny
http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipedepictor7x.cgi?426
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Thursday, August 22, 2013, 1:34pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from ginnyTN
Ruthiegirl,

Perhaps your amounts were a typo, but you reversed the percentages and listed 1 part cream of tartar to 2 parts baking soda.  

Sorry to disagree with you, but every recipe I've ever read specifies 1 part baking soda to 2 parts cream of tartar.  (book2)

I've made a LOT worse typos (like all the time) than that!  (dizzy)


Nope. No  typo. I've always used more baking soda than cream of tartar. I've never tried it the other way around. I suppose it might work with the two in equal parts?
Posted by: ginnyTN, Friday, August 23, 2013, 12:36am; Reply: 7
Lola - Thanks for posting that link.  Those were the recipes I was referring to - they all call for 1 part baking soda and 2 parts cream tartar.  I've seen the same percentages in other recipes on other web sites on line also.  

Ruthie - I always wondered what would happen if you used a different ratio!!!  The baking soda costs a lot less than the cream of tartar, for sure, so if you can use less of the cream of tartar you can save a couple pennies.    (dance)
Posted by: C_Sharp, Friday, August 23, 2013, 12:25pm; Reply: 8
In most foods you can use less cream of tarter, because there are other acid ingredients to react to.

If you make a food with less acid ingredients, the baking soda will not fully react and therefore you will have a heavier baking product (fewer gas bubbles than if you had more cream of tarter.  

In a recipe with more acid ingredients, you are using more soda than you need. You will have more bubbles. Some of the extra bubbles will coalesce to form large bubbles and other bubbles will escape.


If the recipe called for a lot of baking powder, it is possible you caould taste the soda. But it would need to be a fair amount for the soda flavor to stand out.
Print page generated: Friday, October 31, 2014, 6:08pm