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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Kale Chips
Posted by: Joy, Friday, July 5, 2013, 12:38am
As I was browsing the internet I came upon a very simple recipe for kale chips.

I've been eating more kale lately (the curly variety) in salads only to increase fiber and vitamins.  I know kale is good on both counts.

Have to admit I was a little tired of preparing it in a salad and decided to try the kale chips although they didn't really sound too appetizing.  

I cooked these in my toaster oven.  Preheat oven to 375 degrees, wash and separate the kale from the center vein.  Try to dry these pieces as much as you can.  Then coat each piece with olive oil (I used a paper towel soaked with olive oil).  I then sprinkled on a bit of salt (I have to have a bit of salt but you don't if that is your choice).  

Bake at 375 degrees for approx. 10-15 minutes.  The kale pieces will shrink but get crispy.  I found that I took them out sooner than even 10 minutes but you have to experiment.  

To my great surprise they were a bit crunchy, not to "green" tasting and actually quite good.  I expect that they retained their nutritional value while baking.

It is very easy and a nice change from salad kale or even cooked kale on the stove.

I hope you agree.

Joy
Posted by: BCgal, Friday, July 5, 2013, 2:19am; Reply: 1
Sounds good, Joy.  I,m going to try drying some in my food dryer for our canoe trip this fall.
Posted by: Serenity, Friday, July 5, 2013, 2:41am; Reply: 2
Also silverbeet or chard are delicious as chips:)
Posted by: Enobattar, Friday, July 5, 2013, 11:40am; Reply: 3
[quote=5278]Sounds good, Joy.  I,m going to try drying some in my food dryer for our canoe trip this fall.

Not sure just drying them will give the same result, though.  I think they must have that coating of oil.   ??)
Posted by: BCgal, Friday, July 5, 2013, 12:34pm; Reply: 4
That's true, Enobattar.  It just reminded me of the many things I have to get drying for this canoe trip.
Posted by: Chloe, Friday, July 5, 2013, 2:43pm; Reply: 5
My process of making kale chips insures none of the chips will burn and creates a lighter, sweeter
taste because the oil doesn't overheat.  I take a bunch of kale and soak it....then dismantle it with
a knife by cutting out the long stem and then chopping it into large pieces.  I put the damp kale on
a paper towel, go get a zip lock bag, drizzle in some evoo (a few tsps) and take batches of the still
damp kale and squish them around in the bag....I keep adding a little more kale and see if I need to
add more evoo.  Trying to coat kale without making it heavy or oily.  Because my dog likes to eat
these chips, I don't add salt, but for humans, I add sea salt into the bag.

I set the oven at the lowest temperature on the dial....like 200 and preheat the oven. I place the pieces
of kale far enough apart so no two pieces touch on my baking sheet which has been lined with
parchment paper.

Then I bake in about 4 batches.  When kale fully dries, rather than actually bake, I just dump the whole sheet onto clean paper towel and let fully air dry before I pack into a big zip loc bag.

The difference between setting the oven high and keeping it super low is that the oil that was sitting on the leaves doesn't wind up tasting bitter and the chips remain light, crispy and keep their bright green color.  I lost the bright green color at a higher temp.

I always had an issue with the kale getting too brown. If I let it bake too long at a higher temperature, a few of the leaves always got too dark.  The super low temperature insures a perfect outcome every time.  Each batch takes me about 12 minutes.  Sometimes I turn the pieces halfway, sometimes I don't.  Either way, they fully dry in that time. .

I like to use lacinto kale.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, July 5, 2013, 3:50pm; Reply: 6
I may have to try that low-temp method. I usually cook them at a high heat so they get crispy. Maybe they'll crisp better if I use your method of insuring "just the right amount of oil" as mine often seem soggy.

Jack likes to eat kale chips, and he doesn't normally eat a lot of green veggies. I have some kale from this week's CSA so I should make some chips soon.
Posted by: Joy, Friday, July 5, 2013, 4:16pm; Reply: 7
The low heat method would also work but I'm not a patient person and cooking in the toaster oven at the higher heat for a shorter time didn't make them brown at all.
They were bright green and crispy.

As I said drying them first is essential (paper towels do not get them dry - I tried) and then applying the oil with whatever method works for you has to be done before you bake them.  

Lightly salted makes them a great snack.

Joy
Posted by: Chloe, Friday, July 5, 2013, 6:05pm; Reply: 8
Jpy, Interesting that you're needing for your kale to be dry....Mine go into the baggie with evoo in
a rather damp state.....they dry out in the oven, while the very light amount of oil adheres perfectly to each chip....and every chip comes out dry, crispy and can last in a baggie for weeks.  Like I said, my dog absolutely loves these...She barks at me all day long to give her more.  I think she eats an entire batch of kale chips per week all by herself  :)  

Ruthie, your chips are coming out soggy because you're using too much oil.  I massage my raw kale in the baggie with evoo that I added FIRST to the bag and keep adding a small amount of kale at a time, while I continue to massage the newly added pieces until all kale is moistened. I zip up the bag inbetween additions of kale and make sure it contains some air so I can toss my kale around before I put it on a tray.  IT takes very little oil to make good kale chips.
Posted by: Enobattar, Saturday, July 6, 2013, 6:00pm; Reply: 9
Quoted from Chloe
Jpy, Interesting that you're needing for your kale to be dry....Mine go into the baggie with evoo in
a rather damp state.....they dry out in the oven, while the very light amount of oil adheres perfectly to each chip....and every chip comes out dry, crispy and can last in a baggie for weeks.  Ruthie, your chips are coming out soggy because you're using too much oil.  I massage my raw kale in the baggie with evoo that I added FIRST to the bag and keep adding a small amount of kale at a time, while I continue to massage the newly added pieces until all kale is moistened. I zip up the bag inbetween additions of kale and make sure it contains some air so I can toss my kale around before I put it on a tray.  IT takes very little oil to make good kale chips.


I agree that the pieces of kale don't neet to be perfectly dry.  I'm not that patient and simply rinse my organic kale and give it a good shake.  To simplify though, if you'd like to dispense with the baggy and simply throw the pieces into a large enough mixing bowl, drizzle with oil, then just use your fingers to stir and coat each piece, rubbing the oil into all of those curly cracks and crevices; this method works the best for me.  Then simply sprinkle with sea salt if you prefer and bake.  Simple and delicious!

By the way THANKS for sharing that they can be kept for weeks when properly stored.  I thought I had to eat them up immediately for them to be any good.   :)
Posted by: SquarePeg, Sunday, July 7, 2013, 2:01am; Reply: 10
My wife and daughter tried to make kale chips.  My wife was bothered by the cigarette-like smell that they gave off.  Maybe they'll have better results using the lower temperature method.  
Posted by: Joy, Sunday, July 7, 2013, 2:35am; Reply: 11
SquarePeg,

I got the recipe off the internet and thought it would be a great way to have the nutritional value of kale.  

I have Never heard anyone compare kale chips to cigarette-like smell.  I find that bothersome and unbelieveable.  

Someone must have had the baking temperature turned up "way too high".  

Mine never had a hint of anything like that.  

Do try other ways of cooking them because mine came out crispy and crunchy and melt in your mouth kale.

Good luck.

Joy
Posted by: Chloe, Wednesday, July 10, 2013, 3:51pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from SquarePeg
My wife and daughter tried to make kale chips.  My wife was bothered by the cigarette-like smell that they gave off.  Maybe they'll have better results using the lower temperature method.  


This is exactly why I decided to make kale chips at a low temperature.  There is no burnt smell and the kale doesn't impart the cigarette-like flavor either. I can taste the flavor of kale now that
the kale chips are slowly dried, rather than actually being baked.  Probably the nutrients are
staying intact.  My oven has a convection setting which I want to try....circulates air and probaby
will speed up the process, although I made 3 batches in a short amount of time this week.

Joy, I've tried the bowl method and it works just fine.  But what I do with the oil residue left in
my baggie is make a kale salad.  I use a different type of kale....not the lacinto as in for my chips,
but the young curly kale which is lighter in texture.  I quickly blanch chopped kale which I've de-stemmed and then plunge into ice water to stop cooking.  Drain in a colander and then put on
paper towel to dry.  Add to baggie with EVOO oil residue from kale chip batch, add more EVOO, sea salt, toasted pine nuts, handful of currants and squish around with bag closed.  When serving, it's supposed to have grated romano or parmesan cheese on top, but I use nutritional yeast.  AND I store my  salad in that same baggie.  So two purposes for one baggie plus it's
a now a container which I close and store in my vegetable bin in refrigerator.  But I eat it pretty
quickly.  Maybe two to three servings.

Just lazy...nothing to wash....not even my hands!  :)

Posted by: Ligia, Wednesday, July 10, 2013, 5:08pm; Reply: 13
Try a salad spinner to get as much water out.

Could the cigarette smell be from burning of leftover from previous oven use?  Like the oil that spatters when roasting chicken, etc.
Posted by: SquarePeg, Wednesday, July 10, 2013, 5:30pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from Ligia
-- snip --

Could the cigarette smell be from burning of leftover from previous oven use?  Like the oil that spatters when roasting chicken, etc.
That's possible.  Previously, someone tried to make pizza with abundant EVOO and neglected to put a tray underneath.  We plan to run the clean cycle on the first cold night we get, which won't be for a few months....
Posted by: Chloe, Wednesday, July 10, 2013, 5:37pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from Ligia


Could the cigarette smell be from burning of leftover from previous oven use?  Like the oil that spatters when roasting chicken, etc.


My oven is always kept clean and the cigarette burning smell is clearly from the slight burning
tinge that is taking place on leaves of kale when EVOO which shouldn't be heated to 400 degrees is probably creating dangerous chemicals when combined with live plant matter.

Quoted from Ligia
Try a salad spinner to get as much water out.



I gave away my salad spinner because it was taking up too much room in a cabinet.  Sometimes
simple is better.  You can put lettuce leaves or any wet washed leafy greens in a kitchen towel
and start rotating your arm for about 10-15 rotations and become your own salad spinner.  :)
Try it, it works!


Posted by: Joy, Wednesday, July 10, 2013, 7:38pm; Reply: 16
OK, Chloe

Lower temperature for kale chips from now on.  Also, I won't try to dry them so thoroughly as I had before.

Like I said I got the original recipe off the internet and now I'm learning how to tweak the recipe.

Hope everyone who enjoys kale chips does the same.  You're so right, they don't last long at all because I usually eat them at one sitting.

Thanks for the info.

Joy
Posted by: Enobattar, Thursday, July 11, 2013, 1:51pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from Chloe



I gave away my salad spinner because it was taking up too much room in a cabinet.  Sometimes
simple is better.  You can put lettuce leaves or any wet washed leafy greens in a kitchen towel
and start rotating your arm for about 10-15 rotations and become your own salad spinner.  :)
Try it, it works!




Cool! I'm going to try that.  Thanks.    :D
Posted by: kescah, Monday, July 15, 2013, 5:49pm; Reply: 18
I just made the chips for the first time. I made some with olive oil and some with walnut oil because it is an omega 3 oil- which we all need to make sure to get in our diets.

I actually like the walnut oil ones better, and they  have a better crispiness- though that might have something to do with the length of time in the oven. I just took each tray out when they felt about right.
Posted by: Chloe, Monday, July 15, 2013, 6:14pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from kescah
I just made the chips for the first time. I made some with olive oil and some with walnut oil because it is an omega 3 oil- which we all need to make sure to get in our diets.

I actually like the walnut oil ones better, and they  have a better crispiness- though that might have something to do with the length of time in the oven. I just took each tray out when they felt about right.


Did you bake at a high temp or low temp?  I don't think mine can get any crispier....I've used only EVOO...Walnut oil is really delicate....better to heat at very low temps if heating at all.

Read @ culinary uses for walnut oil
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walnut_oil

Posted by: Debra+, Tuesday, July 16, 2013, 12:22pm; Reply: 20
This is my favorite way to make Kale chips....some tweaking to be done...soaked almonds (usually overnight and skins removed) instead of cashews...the red pepper I roast first....no soya sauce for me...not really needed ;-)  olive oil instead of veggie oil...I have a dehydrator that I use(put them in at night and by morning they are done)....using the oven method on a very LOW heat works just as well.  IIt also says the kale chips will last a week in an airtight container.  Ha...mine are lucky to make it to the airtight container at all.  ;-)   Enjoy.   I love to double and triple this recipe also.  ;-)  

Debra :-)    

Cheesy Kale Chips
Serves 2 to 4 as a snack
3/4 cup cashews
1 bunch kale, washed and dried
1/2 red bell pepper, stem and seeds removed, chopped into large pieces
1 clove garlic, peeled
1 tablespoon soy sauce
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1/3 cup nutritional yeast (not to be confused with Brewer's yeast)
1 lemon, peeled, cut into wedges, and de-seeded as much as possible (a few stragglers are ok)

Cover the cashews with water in a small bowl and let the soak for at least one hour before proceeding.

Preheat oven to the lowest heat setting (mine is 180 degrees). Line several baking sheets with parchment paper. Drain cashews and set aside. Trim stems the from each kale leaf and cut each leaf into chip-size pieces.

Add the cashews, red pepper, garlic, soy sauce, oil, and nutritional yeast to a food processor. Scoop the flesh from the lemon and add this to the food processor as well. Blend until smooth. (Alternatively, you can use just the lemon juice for a slightly less bright lemon flavor.)

In a large bowl, combine kale and cashew paste, making sure kale is evenly coated. Place kale pieces on baking sheets allowing space between each piece so they do not touch or overlap. This will take more than one batch, so reserve any remaining kale and refrigerate, covered, until first batch has finished baking.

Bake kale until crisp and completely dry, between 2 and 4 hours. Check after the first hour and turn leaves over. Check kale periodically. Chips will be ready when crunchy and stiff and topping doesn't feel chewy or moist.

Kale chips will keep in an air tight container for one week.
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, July 16, 2013, 2:44pm; Reply: 21
Debra, I don't think these chips would even last a week! Yummmmm!
Posted by: Debra+, Tuesday, July 16, 2013, 7:09pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from Spring
Debra, I don't think these chips would even last a week! Yummmmm!


Doubling and tripling the recipe doesn't last a week either. ;-)  

Debra  :-)  


Posted by: Joy, Wednesday, July 17, 2013, 3:24am; Reply: 23
Debra+

That recipe sounds awesome!  I was all onboard to try it until I read bake 2-4 hours.
I know, it takes time to make something so yummy but I am of the "impatient" cooking style so until I can get someone else to cook this recipe I will stick with the 20 minute kale recipe.

Thanks for sharing that.  I'm sure they don't last too long and I do love crunch.

Joy
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, July 17, 2013, 4:52pm; Reply: 24
My last batch came out nice and crispy, with only 10 minutes of baking time. Thanks Chloe, for the tip about using "just enough" oil!

However, they got all soggy in the pantry when I stored them in a zip-close plastic bag. I'll need to re-toast them for a few minutes before my son will eat them (or I may use them in cooking in place of raw greens.)
Posted by: Chloe, Wednesday, July 17, 2013, 4:58pm; Reply: 25
Quoted from ruthiegirl
My last batch came out nice and crispy, with only 10 minutes of baking time. Thanks Chloe, for the tip about using "just enough" oil!

However, they got all soggy in the pantry when I stored them in a zip-close plastic bag. I'll need to re-toast them for a few minutes before my son will eat them (or I may use them in cooking in place of raw greens.)


Mine don't get soggy....but it could be because our house has central  A/C and kitchen doesn't
have high humidity.....  I've kept many bags of kale in baggies for weeks.  Still wondering if you've used too much oil or if they  need to bake a bit longer.  When they're done, they slide off the
pan and hit the paper towel with the sound of rustling leaves...  Mine are so super light and crispy, they're almost like delicate dry leaves that fall off trees in the autumn.  And maybe we're using different kale.  I use lacinto....dark green, long narrow leaves, slightly curly.  In the oven, the curl disappears.

Posted by: kescah, Wednesday, July 17, 2013, 9:33pm; Reply: 26
Chloe, I baked them at 200 F and kept an eye on them for readiness. I might have used too much olive oil in the first batch, but I prefer the taste with walnut oil thus far. And yes, omega 3s cannot take much heat. I may try the dehydrator for it. But that means you have to wait.;D
Posted by: passionprincess, Wednesday, July 17, 2013, 11:36pm; Reply: 27
Thanks for the recipe! Been looking for an easy kale chip recipe. :-)
Posted by: Averno, Thursday, July 18, 2013, 2:42pm; Reply: 28
Tried it yesterday. A batch of kale (the kind that looks like seersucker, lacinto?) rinsed & dried in a spinner.
Put it in a bag with about 1/2 tsp walnut oil and a little sea salt.  
Then onto a big cookie sheet and into a 300* convection oven for 10 min.

Chloe, your "autmn leaves" description was spot on. Very delicate & dry.

DW and I ate the whole thing before they even cooled down.

Next time we'll try the regular curly type in hopes of a more substatial chip.
Posted by: Chloe, Thursday, July 18, 2013, 3:14pm; Reply: 29
Quoted from kescah
Chloe, I baked them at 200 F and kept an eye on them for readiness. I might have used too much olive oil in the first batch, but I prefer the taste with walnut oil thus far. And yes, omega 3s cannot take much heat. I may try the dehydrator for it. But that means you have to wait.;D


On a super low temp, walnut oil isn't reaching a smoking point so the natural walnut oil flavor
isn't imparting a burnt taste......so I would think using walnut oil is just as good as using EVOO
if you have it as a beneficial.

Originally I followed the recipe that is circulating all over the internet, where it says to bake
kale leaves at a high temperature for a shorter time....Just don't think it's the safest way to use delicate oils.  Notice how the lower temperature doesn't even lightly singe the tips of the kale....keeping the leaves looking fresh and bright green....which tells me we're ingesting a healthier product than eating browned leaves.  

I'm sure many of you know the dangers of eating browned foods.  For those who don't, here's something to read about the dangers of glycation.

http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2003/may2003_awsi_01.htm

Yes, Averno, that's lacinto kale....great description....like seersucker...:)  Glad you had good results.

Posted by: Debra+, Thursday, July 18, 2013, 5:24pm; Reply: 30
Quoted from Joy
Debra+

That recipe sounds awesome!  I was all onboard to try it until I read bake 2-4 hours.
I know, it takes time to make something so yummy but I am of the "impatient" cooking style so until I can get someone else to cook this recipe I will stick with the 20 minute kale recipe.

Thanks for sharing that.  I'm sure they don't last too long and I do love crunch.

Joy


Joy...that is why I love my dehydrator...put it on at night and it's ready in the morning or put it on in the morning and go to work and done by the time I get back.    Once you make these...there is no going back.  ;-)  

Debra :-)  

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