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BTD Forums  /  SWAMI Xpress  /  Dark Chocolate with Milk Fat
Posted by: SquarePeg, Thursday, May 23, 2013, 8:40pm
On my SWAMI, chocolate is neutral and Ghee is a superfood.  (Butter is black dot.)

Isn't ghee essentially Milk Fat?

A good quality chocolate bar has Milk Fat in its ingredients list, so I wonder if it's compliant.
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, May 23, 2013, 8:56pm; Reply: 1
http://www.dadamo.com/B2blogs/blogs/index.php/2009/01/15/butyrate-and-ghee?blog=27
Posted by: Lloyd, Thursday, May 23, 2013, 10:03pm; Reply: 2
Quoted from SquarePeg
Ghee is a superfood.  (Butter is black dot.)



Wow. A lot of difference for very low levels of non-fat contaminants.

I would treat milk fat as equivalent to cream. For what it's worth.

There are dairy free chocolate bars. I believe one brand that makes them is Lindt, you will need to check.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Thursday, May 23, 2013, 10:15pm; Reply: 3
Vivani does not add milk fat:

http://www.4yourtype.com/prodinfo.asp?number=NP131
Posted by: SquarePeg, Thursday, May 23, 2013, 11:15pm; Reply: 4
@ Lola, thanks, but I knew all that, and I infer from it that ghee is milk fat.  I use ghee regularly btw.


@ Lloyd, thanks, but some of the Lindt does have milk fat, which is why I ask.  I suppose Lindt could tell me exactly what their milk fat is.

@ C#, thanks.  I'll consider it the next time I order from NAP.
Posted by: Lloyd, Thursday, May 23, 2013, 11:35pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from SquarePeg
@ Lola, thanks, but I knew all that, and I infer from it that ghee is milk fat.  I use ghee regularly btw.


@ Lloyd, thanks, but some of the Lindt does have milk fat, which is why I ask.  I suppose Lindt could tell me exactly what their milk fat is.

@ C#, thanks.  I'll consider it the next time I order from NAP.


No really. Look at this one:

http://www.lindtusa.com/common/images/products/nutritional/392977_nutr.pdf

How about zero for the 90% cocoa bar?

Also the 99%: http://www.lindtusa.com/common/images/products/nutritional/391873A_nutr.pdf
85%: http://www.lindtusa.com/common/images/products/nutritional/392851_nutr.pdf


http://www.lindtusa.com/category-exec/category_id/19/nm/Excellence/refine/1/sort_by/best_sellers

There may be others with no milk.

Posted by: Lin, Thursday, May 23, 2013, 11:45pm; Reply: 6
Enjoy Life does Gluten/Dairy free chocolate bars, sold by Whole Foods Shop.
Posted by: Victoria, Friday, May 24, 2013, 12:46am; Reply: 7
Ghee (pure butter oil) has the milk solids removed, which is the big difference between it and butter (fat plus some milk solids).  Candy with 'butterfat' most likely has a good bit of milk left in it.
Posted by: SquarePeg, Friday, May 24, 2013, 12:34pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from Lloyd
Yes, I'm finding non-dairy Lindt bars.  But allowing milk fat gives me more options.  In particular there's a chili bar with milk fat that I'd like to find.  But I checked the website and found that it also contains dreaded artificial flavors, so it's off my list.

Posted by: SquarePeg, Friday, May 24, 2013, 12:38pm; Reply: 9
All, thank you for the links to online products.  I currently buy non-dairy chocolate for my vegan daughter, so finding compliant chocolate is not the issue.

The Excellence Lindt bars I buy for myself are on sale this week at our drug store for a mere $1.99 plus 6.35% tax.  That about 67% of my price limit of $1 / ounce!  I bought (only) four two days ago. ;)
Posted by: ProudVEGANWarrior, Friday, May 24, 2013, 6:49pm; Reply: 10
To make ghee, you melt butter and skim the solids off the surface. So ghee is butter with the milk solids removed.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Sunday, May 26, 2013, 8:19pm; Reply: 11
Cream is the fatty part of the milk when it's separated from whole milk.  Butter is purified from cream, and ghee is purified from butter. Ghee is pure milk fat, with no other milk solids. Butter contains a little bit of water and some milk solids, while the cream contains a fair amount of milk proteins and lactose. Not enough to be a good source of protein or carbs, but enough to cause problems if you react poorly to milk proteins.

I do not know what candy companies use in their "milk fat." It could be cream, butter, or ghee. Without knowing more details, I would assume that they use cream, which is the least refined and probably the least expensive.
Posted by: BluesSinger, Sunday, May 26, 2013, 8:49pm; Reply: 12
I would love to make a homemade choc bar with ghee that would taste similar to my favorites out there.. but that is hard.  I got addicted to the milk choc bars not the dark ones and i have a very hard time adjusting to the dark flavor of choc although I know that his the best one for a person.  plus i can't have sugar so agave based bars... beet sugar bars, etc.  and I've tried many on the market but still nothing compares to a good milk choc bar.  

sometimes I get the beet sugar based milk choc bar - and i forget what company puts it out.. but I suffer from the milk and it does indeed spike my addiction tendencies.  so i have to stay away.
Posted by: snazzyshazz, Monday, May 27, 2013, 9:31pm; Reply: 13
I am currently making a chocolate that I am enjoying as much as store bought chocolate, although it is dark - sorry, BluesSinger. I have gradually acquired a taste for dark over the years.

My chocolate has 3-4 tablespoons of organic cocoa powder, and the same of organic carob powder (gives the chocolate a milder flavour and somewhat caramel hint). I mix in about a tablespoon of butter (haven't tried ghee, but can't see why that wouldn't work) and a tablespoon of coconut oil, then enough agave to taste. The food processor makes short work of it. Refrigeration makes it more solid, although not completely, but it is creamy-tasting and delicious.

If I were to use ghee, I would probably add a touch of salt - brings out the sweetness. Or if you can have coconut oil, why not try it with just that instead of butter or ghee.
Posted by: san j, Monday, May 27, 2013, 10:58pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from snazzyshazz
I am currently making a chocolate that I am enjoying as much as store bought chocolate, although it is dark - sorry, BluesSinger. I have gradually acquired a taste for dark over the years.

My chocolate has 3-4 tablespoons of organic cocoa powder, and the same of organic carob powder (gives the chocolate a milder flavour and somewhat caramel hint). I mix in about a tablespoon of butter (haven't tried ghee, but can't see why that wouldn't work) and a tablespoon of coconut oil, then enough agave to taste. The food processor makes short work of it. Refrigeration makes it more solid, although not completely, but it is creamy-tasting and delicious.

If I were to use ghee, I would probably add a touch of salt - brings out the sweetness. Or if you can have coconut oil, why not try it with just that instead of butter or ghee.

Oh, that looks heavenly.
Put it in Recipe Base, maybe?  ;)

Posted by: SquarePeg, Monday, May 27, 2013, 11:47pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from snazzyshazz
I am currently making a chocolate that I am enjoying as much as store bought chocolate, although it is dark - sorry, BluesSinger. I have gradually acquired a taste for dark over the years.

My chocolate has 3-4 tablespoons of organic cocoa powder, and the same of organic carob powder (gives the chocolate a milder flavour and somewhat caramel hint). I mix in about a tablespoon of butter (haven't tried ghee, but can't see why that wouldn't work) and a tablespoon of coconut oil, then enough agave to taste. The food processor makes short work of it. Refrigeration makes it more solid, although not completely, but it is creamy-tasting and delicious.

If I were to use ghee, I would probably add a touch of salt - brings out the sweetness. Or if you can have coconut oil, why not try it with just that instead of butter or ghee.
Sounds a bit like my spiced nuts snack, except that I include nuts.  Also, I use ghee, which is soft enough so that I don't have to use a machine to mix it.  I might also add ginger and a pinch of cayenne.

One benefit of bars is their portability because they're solid at room temperature.

Posted by: SquarePeg, Monday, May 27, 2013, 11:49pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from BluesSinger
I would love to make a homemade choc bar with ghee that would taste similar to my favorites out there.. but that is hard.  I got addicted to the milk choc bars not the dark ones and i have a very hard time adjusting to the dark flavor of choc although I know that his the best one for a person.  plus i can't have sugar so agave based bars... beet sugar bars, etc.  and I've tried many on the market but still nothing compares to a good milk choc bar.  

sometimes I get the beet sugar based milk choc bar - and i forget what company puts it out.. but I suffer from the milk and it does indeed spike my addiction tendencies.  so i have to stay away.
I guess the trick is to find a "sweet fat" that can replace cream.  Perhaps avocado might be an improvement?

Posted by: SquarePeg, Monday, May 27, 2013, 11:53pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from ruthiegirl
Cream is the fatty part of the milk when it's separated from whole milk.  Butter is purified from cream, and ghee is purified from butter. Ghee is pure milk fat, with no other milk solids. Butter contains a little bit of water and some milk solids, while the cream contains a fair amount of milk proteins and lactose. Not enough to be a good source of protein or carbs, but enough to cause problems if you react poorly to milk proteins.

I do not know what candy companies use in their "milk fat." It could be cream, butter, or ghee. Without knowing more details, I would assume that they use cream, which is the least refined and probably the least expensive.
Thank you for explaining the differences, Ruthiegirl!  My thinking is that they'd use the most refined version because they can use or sell off the whey for some other product.

Right now I really need to cut back on sugar, so chocolate has been sidelined.

Posted by: BluesSinger, Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 2:53pm; Reply: 18
Quoted from snazzyshazz
I am currently making a chocolate that I am enjoying as much as store bought chocolate, although it is dark - sorry, BluesSinger. I have gradually acquired a taste for dark over the years.

My chocolate has 3-4 tablespoons of organic cocoa powder, and the same of organic carob powder (gives the chocolate a milder flavour and somewhat caramel hint). I mix in about a tablespoon of butter (haven't tried ghee, but can't see why that wouldn't work) and a tablespoon of coconut oil, then enough agave to taste. The food processor makes short work of it. Refrigeration makes it more solid, although not completely, but it is creamy-tasting and delicious.

If I were to use ghee, I would probably add a touch of salt - brings out the sweetness. Or if you can have coconut oil, why not try it with just that instead of butter or ghee.


I can have it all except for the coconut oil and i also cannot have avocados.  So i'm going to try the above!  how fun!!!
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 3:04pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from SquarePeg
Thank you for explaining the differences, Ruthiegirl!  My thinking is that they'd use the most refined version because they can use or sell off the whey for some other product.

Right now I really need to cut back on sugar, so chocolate has been sidelined.



Whey is separated out from milk, not cream. The liquid left after churning butter is called buttermilk but most "buttermilk" on store shelves is fermented lowfat milk. Cultures are added to milk and given time to ferment, rather than using the actual liquid left over from butter making. I'm not sure what the actual buttermilk is used for when butter is made in factories.

When butter is made into ghee, the water is boiled off and the milk solids are filtered out and discarded. I can't imagine any kind of practical use for that- it's just burnt sediment. That's why commercial ghee is more expensive than commercial butter- it's a more labor-intensive process and there's no "second product to sell" at the end of it.

"Milkfat" in a candy bar could be either cream or butter. If it was ghee, I think they would specify that. Since we don't know, I assume it's the "least pure" version.
Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 3:58pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from ruthiegirl
Whey is separated out from milk, not cream. The liquid left after churning butter is called buttermilk but most "buttermilk" on store shelves is fermented lowfat milk.

I think the liquid left from making butter is basically whey as well.  It may have more or less components than the whey left from making cheese (cottage or other), but I think it is mostly the same thing.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 4:40pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from ABJoe

I think the liquid left from making butter is basically whey as well.  It may have more or less components than the whey left from making cheese (cottage or other), but I think it is mostly the same thing.

NOPE all our organic buttermilk is made from butter production-we only do cultured butter.
It taste  and looks completely different than whey - it is much thicker as well.

Posted by: BluesSinger, Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 4:44pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from snazzyshazz
I am currently making a chocolate that I am enjoying as much as store bought chocolate, although it is dark - sorry, BluesSinger. I have gradually acquired a taste for dark over the years.

My chocolate has 3-4 tablespoons of organic cocoa powder, and the same of organic carob powder (gives the chocolate a milder flavour and somewhat caramel hint). I mix in about a tablespoon of butter (haven't tried ghee, but can't see why that wouldn't work) and a tablespoon of coconut oil, then enough agave to taste. The food processor makes short work of it. Refrigeration makes it more solid, although not completely, but it is creamy-tasting and delicious.

If I were to use ghee, I would probably add a touch of salt - brings out the sweetness. Or if you can have coconut oil, why not try it with just that instead of butter or ghee.


Ok I made with using ghee and walnut oil and agave (since my chocolate powder is sugar free), and mixed in a mashed overripe banana and now have put it in the freezer.  so far it doesn't taste all that great.  too much chocolate taste.. i agree i need to get some carob to mix in although I'm not a fan of carob - but it may be ok in this recipe.  

maybe i'll try rice syrup next time.  
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 4:52pm; Reply: 23
You probably used  too much chocolate and not enough agave, and possibly not enough oil either. A touch of salt can make it taste less bitter too. If you can have stevia, that will add sweetness without altering the texture.
Posted by: BluesSinger, Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 6:11pm; Reply: 24
Quoted from ruthiegirl
You probably used  too much chocolate and not enough agave, and possibly not enough oil either. A touch of salt can make it taste less bitter too. If you can have stevia, that will add sweetness without altering the texture.


i definitely used too much chocolate  but I put in ALOT of agave and lots of oil and i did add salt.  so next time i'll experiment with rice syrup and less chocolate!  i've used stevia in these types of things before and did not like it.    but thank you for the tips!!!  
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 6:13pm; Reply: 25
I've found that stevia doesn't work when it's the ONLY sweetener in the recipe, but it works great to enhance the sweetness in recipes that already have some sugar. I've used it as the "only added sweetener" in recipes with some fruit in it, or combined it with agave so I could use less agave.
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