Print Topic - Archive

BTD Forums  /  The GenoType Diet  /  Warriors: Milk substitute?
Posted by: 46840 (Guest), Sunday, May 12, 2013, 5:48pm
Hi everyone--I am new to this diet and very happy about the change. Please forgive me if this questions has been answered before. I looked around and attempted a search but didn't find anything.

I have used the criteria in the book to determine that I am clearly a Warrior type. I would like to use a half-and-half substitute in my coffee, but a long search at the grocery store was pretty unproductive. Most non-dairy "milks" have a lot of additives that won't work for a warrior, as I'm sure those of you of that type know. I ended up getting some Silk Soymilk and some Tempt Hempmilk, not ideal because they're so thin, and also not good choices in the end because I realized later that the carrageenan they contain is on the "no" list.

Any ideas from those of you with experience? I live in a city with a lot of food availability, luckily. A little cream in my coffee is the only milk I consume. Thank you!
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Sunday, May 12, 2013, 5:55pm; Reply: 1
Taking a look at the Warrior diet in my book, I see that almond and rice milks are superfoods, while soymilk is neutral (it appears in neither the beneficial or toxin lists, yet I know it's tested because it's a "toxin" for other genotypes.)

There are commercial soymilks available that contain just two ingredients: organic soybeans and water. These are shelf-stable boxes, not found in the refrigerated case. Trader Joe's has this variety in their own brand, plus I've seen it in other stores as well, though the brand names escape me. Just read labels carefully, as they're shelved near similar products with unhealthy additives.

Both rice and almond milk are fairly easy to make at home without fancy equipment- just a blender or food processor is needed. When you make your own, you can use less water  and make rice or almond "cream" rather than "milk."  Most people making their own soymilk seem to do so with the use of a special machine for that purpose, although it's not strictly necessary. How did the Japanese make soymilk in the centuries before these machines were made? You can look online for recipes to make your own.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Sunday, May 12, 2013, 8:06pm; Reply: 2
I am generally able to buy soymilk without additives (just soy and water). Just look through the boxes of the shelf stable soy milks until you find one that will work for you.

I almost never buy soy milk.

Instead I make my own nut butters at home.

The way to do this if you do not have equipment to make milk directly from nuts, is to take several spoonfuls of almond butter and put that in a jar with a glass of water and shake vigorously until the almond butter is dispersed in the water. Depending on the type of almond butter used, you may need to filter the milk.
Posted by: 46840 (Guest), Sunday, May 12, 2013, 8:48pm; Reply: 3
Thanks so much for these quick and helpful replies! I just made some rice milk and will try some nut milk next. My blender is very old, but it did well with the rice milk. My friend has a Vitamix, so I can always visit her and use the blender there.

I like to make things myself rather than buy them premade, so I appreciate these suggestions.
Posted by: Victoria, Monday, May 13, 2013, 12:22am; Reply: 4
Quoted from ruthiegirl

Most people making their own soymilk seem to do so with the use of a special machine for that purpose, although it's not strictly necessary. How did the Japanese make soymilk in the centuries before these machines were made? You can look online for recipes to make your own.


Back in the day when I didn't know about eating for my bloodtype/genotype, I made my own tofu, which involved making my own soymilk.  At the time, I lived in a log cabin without electricity and cooked on a wood-burning stove.  

I soaked dried soybeans for 12 hours, then ground them to a pulp with my hand cranked grinder.  The pulp was mixed with water, with an egg beater and simmered for most of the day, then the pulp was strained out and discarded.  What remained was soymilk.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Monday, May 13, 2013, 2:08am; Reply: 5
Quoted from Victoria


Back in the day when I didn't know about eating for my bloodtype/genotype, I made my own tofu, which involved making my own soymilk.  At the time, I lived in a log cabin without electricity and cooked on a wood-burning stove.  

I soaked dried soybeans for 12 hours, then ground them to a pulp with my hand cranked grinder.  The pulp was mixed with water, with an egg beater and simmered for most of the day, then the pulp was strained out and discarded.  What remained was soymilk.


I used to do something similar. Well minus the log cabin part and I used the okara (soy pulp) instead of throwing it out. Sometimes I cooked for a while before grinding the beans.
Posted by: Victoria, Monday, May 13, 2013, 2:47am; Reply: 6
Quoted from C_Sharp


I used to do something similar. Well minus the log cabin part and I used the okara (soy pulp) instead of throwing it out. Sometimes I cooked for a while before grinding the beans.


You know, now that you mentioned it, I think I half-cooked the beans before grinding also because it made the grinder easier to turn.  It was a Corona mill.  Too much cooking before grinding made them too soft.  So I did most of the cooking after the beans were a 'mash'.

I used Nigari (magnesium chloride) as the coagulate to make the soymilk form curds.  That's what people are now spraying on their skin and calling magnesium oil.  ;)
Posted by: C_Sharp, Monday, May 13, 2013, 2:58am; Reply: 7
Never thought to put Nigari on the skin.
Posted by: Drea, Wednesday, May 15, 2013, 1:14am; Reply: 8
I've been making my own almond milk, and I sometimes use powdered non-GMO soy to make soy milk, though I kind of burned out on it...I've never been a fan of milk, in general, and wouldn't consider drinking it alone, but I do like a bit of "milk" in my coffee or when I'm baking... ;D
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, May 15, 2013, 2:35am; Reply: 9
yes magnesium chloride
Print page generated: Tuesday, September 30, 2014, 6:13pm