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Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, April 29, 2013, 4:35am
This was in today's newspaper. I'm going to first post it as is then suggest a few changes.

Sweet Potato Salad

6 cups peeled and cubed sweet potatos
1/2 teaspoon dried ginger
1/2 teaspoon dried cumin
3 tablespoons olive oil divided
1/2 cup chopped green onions
1/4 cup dried cranberries
1/4 cup chopped toasted pecans
2 tablespoons orange juice
2 tablespoons maple syrup
1 tablespoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

Preheat oven to 425F. Line baking sheet with foil and spray with cooking spray. Toss sweet potatos with 1 tablespoon olive oil, ginger, and cumin and spread out on sheet. Roast 30 minutes or till potatoes are crisp. Cool and transfer into a serving bowl. Add onions, pecans, and dried cranberries. In a small bowl add 2 tablespoons olive oil, maple syrup, orange juice, lime juice, and nutmeg. Toss with the potatos

My changes: tangerine juice for orange juice and instead of cooking spray, line the tray with parchment paper, maybe use sweet vidalia onion instead of green onion.

Original source: "Too Hot in the Kitchen" by Holly Clegg
Posted by: DenverFoodie, Monday, April 29, 2013, 5:06am; Reply: 1
Quoted Text
My changes: tangerine juice for orange juice and instead of cooking spray, line the tray with parchment paper, maybe use sweet vidalia onion instead of green onion.


I do something similar using sweet potatoes, beets & onions.

I line the baking sheet with foil which makes clean up real easy :B
Be sure to interlock the sheets of foil if you don't have extra wide foil.
Posted by: Spring, Monday, April 29, 2013, 4:31pm; Reply: 2
Both sound delish! (sunny)
Posted by: Ribbit, Monday, April 29, 2013, 5:01pm; Reply: 3
Yum!  Occasionally I make potato salad with white sweet potatoes (also called Korean or Japanese sweet potatoes).  They taste a little sweet but they're not orange. ;)
Posted by: Jane, Monday, April 29, 2013, 5:16pm; Reply: 4
GCG, sounds delicious.  
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, April 29, 2013, 5:28pm; Reply: 5
Adding juice, dried fruit AND syrup to a starchy vegetable? That sounds way too sweet for me, even if I substituted compliant ingredients (such as grapefruit juice and agave.) I prefer to use savory spices on sweet potatoes and not add any more carbs to the dish than are already in the sweet potatoes themselves.
Posted by: Spring, Monday, April 29, 2013, 5:42pm; Reply: 6
Approx. six servings with a teaspoon each of juice and syrup and about 17 calories of cranberries is something I could deal with very easily on an otherwise good day on my diet.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, April 29, 2013, 6:43pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from Spring
Approx. six servings with a teaspoon each of juice and syrup and about 17 calories of cranberries is something I could deal with very easily on an otherwise good day on my diet.


Actually it's 12 servings at a half cup each. If you are talking about glyceric load the pecan would slow it down a bit. I found apple juice sweetened dried cranberries.

If this works out I may try it also adding a finely diced jalapeno.
Posted by: Seraffa, Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 1:52am; Reply: 8
Men are eternally attracted to hot peppers. I will never know why. Maybe it's the instinct to challenge something powerful; just like in bull fighting, bull running or bull riding. I will substitute hickory or filberts for those pecans. Otherwise everything else looks perfect. Thank you, GCG - this is a "must" for a summer salad debut!  :)
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 2:02am; Reply: 9
Good luck finding the maple syrup. It looks like I'm going to have to pay through the nose at the Health Food Store. I've checked all 3 grocery stores in town. BTW try to find syrup that isn't corn based, even the "no HFCS syrup" still has regular corn syrup.
Posted by: Ribbit, Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 2:03am; Reply: 10
Quoted from ruthiegirl
Adding juice, dried fruit AND syrup to a starchy vegetable? That sounds way too sweet for me, even if I substituted compliant ingredients (such as grapefruit juice and agave.) I prefer to use savory spices on sweet potatoes and not add any more carbs to the dish than are already in the sweet potatoes themselves.


You type Os! ::) ;)
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 5:35am; Reply: 11
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
Actually it's 12 servings at a half cup each. If you are talking about glyceric load the pecan would slow it down a bit. I found apple juice sweetened dried cranberries.

If this works out I may try it also adding a finely diced jalapeno.

It would really be hard for me to just eat a half cup of this delicious sounding dish! But, absolutely no jalapeno for me.   :o
Posted by: yaeli, Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 6:39am; Reply: 12
Thanks for the recipes. Baked sweet potatoes and beets are wonderful together - it's time I buy a new oven.

A reminder: Dried cranberries are often coated with sunflower oil 'finish' - an avoid for B's.  :P  8)
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Tuesday, April 30, 2013, 11:14am; Reply: 13
Quoted from yaeli
Thanks for the recipes. Baked sweet potatoes and beets are wonderful together - it's time I buy a new oven.

A reminder: Dried cranberries are often coated with sunflower oil 'finish' - an avoid for B's.  :P  8)


Yep, just try to find them with out it! Still an auxillery ingredient in one of the lowest volume ingredients is many times better than the usual.
Posted by: jayneeo, Thursday, May 2, 2013, 1:55am; Reply: 14
this sounds sooo good! And sweet potatoes are low glycemic, if not low cal. ;)
Posted by: DenverFoodie, Thursday, May 2, 2013, 4:40am; Reply: 15
Quoted from Seraffa
just like in bull fighting, bull running or bull riding.

That's a lot of bull! ::)
Sorry.  Couldn't pass it up! ;)

Posted by: Tom Martens, Thursday, May 2, 2013, 12:47pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from Ribbit


You type Os! ::) ;)


This Type O loves his sweets ;)
Posted by: yaeli, Friday, May 3, 2013, 9:27am; Reply: 17
:D  8)
Posted by: Jane, Friday, May 3, 2013, 2:03pm; Reply: 18
Me too......
Posted by: O in Virginia, Sunday, May 5, 2013, 12:46pm; Reply: 19
That looks delicious, Gulfcoastguy.  :)  I would use pineapple juice rather than orange, and agave syrup rather than maple syrup - but the rest of it looks like mostly supers for me.

I had a recipe a while back for sweet potato and white potato salad with mustard greens that was very good.  I would just omit the white potatoes today, but the mustard greens and the sweet potatoes were a good combination in a salad.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Sunday, May 5, 2013, 3:50pm; Reply: 20
Yes, as allways, adapt as needed. For my self 2 tablespoons of maple syrup is 1/2 teaspoon a serving. Pineapple is a good combination with sweetpotatos or winter squash.
Posted by: Kristin, Sunday, May 5, 2013, 4:46pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
Good luck finding the maple syrup. It looks like I'm going to have to pay through the nose at the Health Food Store. I've checked all 3 grocery stores in town. BTW try to find syrup that isn't corn based, even the "no HFCS syrup" still has regular corn syrup.


Big maple syrup heist in Canada last year... one of the largest agricultural thefts on record. It could account for the exorbitant prices lately.

http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2013-01-02/the-great-canadian-maple-syrup-heist

Posted by: Tom Martens, Monday, May 6, 2013, 2:39pm; Reply: 22
I tried the salad last night and I think I could do without the nutmeg.

I replaced the maple syrup with honey and orange juice with black cherry juice.

My only question is how to "crisp" the cubed sweet potatoes without burning them.
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 12:31am; Reply: 23
Quoted from ruthiegirl
Adding juice, dried fruit AND syrup to a starchy vegetable? That sounds way too sweet for me, even if I substituted compliant ingredients (such as grapefruit juice and agave.) I prefer to use savory spices on sweet potatoes and not add any more carbs to the dish than are already in the sweet potatoes themselves.

And the audience said:
(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)

Plus: Really struggling to understand this being characterized as a "salad".
Posted by: O in Virginia, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 1:28am; Reply: 24
"Salad" covers a pretty broad spectrum of foods.  Not just greens.  ESPECIALLY in the south!   ;)
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 2:13am; Reply: 25
O in V! Blast from the Past! How the heck are ya?

Re: "Salad".
This is really, really sweet, with neither the fresh succulence nor the sour acidity (nor even some herbal bitterness) that would nudge it, IMO, into the Salad category.

Raw julienned/shredded carrots can be served intensely sweet, for instance, as a carrot salad - precisely because they are raw and crunchy. The raisins one often finds in it, and the sugar-load in the dressing, are often offset by a major amount of vinegar.
Cole slaw, likewise.

If the sweet potato dish were served warm, it'd be a side dish, right? And even then, that sweetness would demand Some Game-y Meat to justify choosing it as a side dish, the way I'm reading it, and would require the accompaniment of those other (bitter, succulent, acidic) elements in another side dish/relish/salad, to balance the course.

With what do you serve it? At what meal? Curious as to how Southerners serve this so as to consider it a salad.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 3:10am; Reply: 26
Quoted from san j
O in V! Blast from the Past! How the heck are ya?

Re: "Salad".
This is really, really sweet, with neither the fresh succulence nor the sour acidity (nor even some herbal bitterness) that would nudge it, IMO, into the Salad category.

Raw julienned/shredded carrots can be served intensely sweet, for instance, as a carrot salad - precisely because they are raw and crunchy. The raisins one often finds in it, and the sugar-load in the dressing, are often offset by a major amount of vinegar.
Cole slaw, likewise.

If the sweet potato dish were served warm, it'd be a side dish, right? And even then, that sweetness would demand Some Game-y Meat to justify choosing it as a side dish, the way I'm reading it, and would require the accompaniment of those other (bitter, succulent, acidic) elements in another side dish/relish/salad, to balance the course.

With what do you serve it? At what meal? Curious as to how Southerners serve this so as to consider it a salad.


I has cumin, lime juice, orange juice, and green onion. I think that qualifies as the acidic and bitter elements.As I was saying I might consider adding finely diced jalapeno to it The recipe was in the paper a day or 2 before I posted it so I haven't actually used it yet. Potato salad is typically used with bbq as is coleslaw. I imagine most southern cooks would serve it with pork either roasted or bbqed but sweet potatos are served with whatever is availible in the small farms my parents grew up on. It would make a great alternative to the common marshmallow topped oversweetened mashed sweet potato caserole at Thanksgiving, only 2 tablespoons of maple syrup in the whole dish.
Southern farm or rural cooking usually relegates sweet potatos to a sidedish. As a kid I've had them just baked whole with a little butter on top, sliced and fried as chips, mashed with varying amounts of sugar or molasses added, shredded with a little flour and made into pancakes, pies, placed around a ham that is roasting, cut up and baked with butter and pineapple juice and brown sugar. As an adult I've made chipolte scalloped sweet potatos and sweet potatos sauteed with peppers and onions, a dish of alternating layersof apple and sweet potato with cream and pepper and thyme.
A salad is usually served cold with some type of dressing that contains oil and an acid like mayo and dill pickles and onions in a regular potato salad.
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 3:26am; Reply: 27
Quoted from san j
With what do you serve it? At what meal? Curious as to how Southerners serve this so as to consider it a salad.

It would be delicious with collards, turnip greens, mustard, kale, etc., etc.. I don't see any difference in calling this dish a salad and calling mixed fruit a salad, which some people do. There are meat salads of all kinds, so what is the big deal?

I don't get where this dish is all that sweet, either, when you divide it into twelve servings. We all are responsible for subbing recipes to suit our own fancies and needs. All this is splitting hairs in my opinion. Especially when I read about people chomping down on things much worse. And getting sick. And posting about it. And feeling terrible for days..... ;D This dish wouldn't make me feel bad at all like the mess I ate at that Italian restaurant did yesterday. Wow! But I took that old Italian bull by the horns and wiped it off the intestinal map in a little over twenty-four hours, learning a serious lesson in the meantime that I didn't need at all. I didn't eat a bite of sugar there, either.
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 3:27am; Reply: 28
Quoted from san j

And the audience said:
(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)(clap)

Plus: Really struggling to understand this being characterized as a "salad".


Which audience?
Posted by: yaeli, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 4:56am; Reply: 29
Quoted from Spring
It would be delicious with collards, turnip greens, mustard, kale, etc., etc.. I don't see any difference in calling this dish a salad and calling mixed fruit a salad, which some people do. There are meat salads of all kinds, so what is the big deal?
Wiki agrees,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salad

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Salad is a non-runny, ready-to-eat dish made of heterogeneous ingredients in a wet or once wet base served chilled or at a moderate temperature.
......
•Dessert salads, sweet versions often containing fruit, gelatin and/or whipped cream


They come in many shapes, many tastes.
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 5:45am; Reply: 30
Quoted from gulfcoastguy


I has cumin, lime juice, orange juice, and green onion. I think that qualifies as the acidic and bitter elements.As I was saying I might consider adding finely diced jalapeno to it The recipe was in the paper a day or 2 before I posted it so I haven't actually used it yet. Potato salad is typically used with bbq as is coleslaw. I imagine most southern cooks would serve it with pork either roasted or bbqed but sweet potatos are served with whatever is availible in the small farms my parents grew up on. It would make a great alternative to the common marshmallow topped oversweetened mashed sweet potato caserole at Thanksgiving, only 2 tablespoons of maple syrup in the whole dish.
Southern farm or rural cooking usually relegates sweet potatos to a sidedish. As a kid I've had them just baked whole with a little butter on top, sliced and fried as chips, mashed with varying amounts of sugar or molasses added, shredded with a little flour and made into pancakes, pies, placed around a ham that is roasting, cut up and baked with butter and pineapple juice and brown sugar. As an adult I've made chipolte scalloped sweet potatos and sweet potatos sauteed with peppers and onions, a dish of alternating layersof apple and sweet potato with cream and pepper and thyme.
A salad is usually served cold with some type of dressing that contains oil and an acid like mayo and dill pickles and onions in a regular potato salad.

You certainly know your sweet potatoes, gcg!
Yeah, I have a feeling that when you do actually fix this, Dr. gcg will be on duty to tweak and refine, jalapeños and far more lime juice at the ready - maybe take a scalpel to those cranberries, except as that Thanksgivng "side dish" (which is, yes, what I'd call it)... :D
Until then, I might like it as a topping for cheesecake!  :o

Posted by: Seraffa, Sunday, May 12, 2013, 5:38am; Reply: 31
Salad in the south, or anywhere in NYC, used to be anything cut up and tossed with mayo.  ;) Hold the mayo, and the bullriders! (clown)
Posted by: Brighid45, Sunday, May 12, 2013, 2:31pm; Reply: 32
It reads like a salad recipe to me. Anyone can add or detract whatever amount of dried cranberries, sweetener, etc they like. You don't want it sweet--don't make it sweet. I think it sounds good the way it is, though I might use dried cherries in place of the cranberries.

Thanks for the recipe GCG! Excellent as always :)
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Sunday, May 12, 2013, 6:36pm; Reply: 33
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
Sweet Potato Salad

6 cups peeled and cubed sweet potatos
1/2 teaspoon dried ginger
1/2 teaspoon dried cumin
3 tablespoons olive oil divided
1/2 cup chopped green onions
1/4 cup dried cranberries
1/4 cup chopped toasted pecans
2 tablespoons orange juice
2 tablespoons maple syrup
1 tablespoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg

Preheat oven to 425F. Line baking sheet with foil and spray with cooking spray. Toss sweet potatos with 1 tablespoon olive oil, ginger, and cumin and spread out on sheet. Roast 30 minutes or till potatoes are crisp. Cool and transfer into a serving bowl. Add onions, pecans, and dried cranberries. In a small bowl add 2 tablespoons olive oil, maple syrup, orange juice, lime juice, and nutmeg. Toss with the potatos

My changes: tangerine juice for orange juice and instead of cooking spray, line the tray with parchment paper, maybe use sweet vidalia onion instead of green onion.

Sounds really interesting, however, I do have to agree with Ruthie that, for me personally, I have a "thing" about sweet sweet potato recipes--I vastly prefer savory ones.  Sweet potatoes are already sweet enough, to me, and they cry out for SAVORY spices/accompaniment.  That said, this particular salad sounds interesting for those who do like sweet sweet potato recipes, and a definite improvement over the typical sickly sweet sweet potato dish with the marshmallow topping.   (dissappointed)(hand)(naughty):P  The cumin and lime, for example, will contrast with, cut, and add complexity to the sweetness of the sweet potato and give the dish a lot of depth.  The green onion will also marry well with it.  Sounds very interesting, though possibly with too many sweet elements for this O nonnie Gatherer--good find, gcg!   :K)

edited to add:  And I would have to add some SEA SALT at some point.  I would just have to.  I'm an O.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Sunday, May 12, 2013, 6:49pm; Reply: 34
p.s.
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
Good luck finding the maple syrup. It looks like I'm going to have to pay through the nose at the Health Food Store. I've checked all 3 grocery stores in town. BTW try to find syrup that isn't corn based, even the "no HFCS syrup" still has regular corn syrup.

Maple syrup (pure maple syrup) is terribly, terribly expensive anymore, sadly.  You could go with a dark raw honey or dark agave (though agave doesn't have the depth/complexity of maple, whereas depending on the honey you get you might be able to get a reasonable facsimile).


Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Sunday, May 12, 2013, 11:45pm; Reply: 35
I allready hocked my left leg for a 1 pint jar of the real store. I'll keep it locked up with my one piece of real silver jewelry.

I have some savory sweet potato recipes but of course they  are loaded with dairy ;D
Posted by: Jane, Tuesday, May 14, 2013, 7:39pm; Reply: 36
GCG - Sounds good to me but this O loves sweets.  
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, May 14, 2013, 9:12pm; Reply: 37
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
Good luck finding the maple syrup. It looks like I'm going to have to pay through the nose at the Health Food Store. I've checked all 3 grocery stores in town. BTW try to find syrup that isn't corn based, even the "no HFCS syrup" still has regular corn syrup.

Quoted from gulfcoastguy
I allready hocked my left leg for a 1 pint jar of the real store.

I was a little confused by this - maybe it's a local phenomenon where you are.

Have you looked at, for instance, Amazon's offerings?
Once you key in all your sorting preferences, such as, say, Organic, there's quite a selection. When I key in "Grade A Maple Syrup", Anderson's Pure Grade A comes up at the top, for $18/quart, delivered. Hidden Springs Organic is $20/qt delivered, etc...

I did the same for Organic Cold-Pressed EVOO and found some comparable prices. Do you have trouble finding affordable organic cold-pressed EVOO as well? One has always had to pay a premium for premium products, but there is a wide spectrum of suppliers and prices.

If you're comparing pure maple syrup to other sorts of syrup, there has always been a great difference in price. But comparing it with itself over time, it doesn't seem to be really unreasonable or anything.

Instead of hocking your left leg for a pint, see if you can find one online for $12 - or even $10... :)
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Tuesday, May 14, 2013, 10:46pm; Reply: 38
My left leg costs $12 a pint. that would be $96.00 gallon. Maple syrup was only found at our health food store. Ordering on line would be $12 plus shipping and a wait.
Posted by: san j, Wednesday, May 15, 2013, 12:15am; Reply: 39
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
My left leg costs $12 a pint. that would be $96.00 gallon. Maple syrup was only found at our health food store. Ordering on line would be $12 plus shipping and a wait.
FYI
Ferguson Farms 100% Pure Vermont Maple Syrup, Grade A Medium, 1 Gallon jug: $53.00
Mansfield Maple Pure Vermont Maple Syrup, Grade A Dark, 1 Gallon jug: $64.99

I think these are very, very reasonable prices.
Maybe you should consider ordering smaller bottles of a few brands until you find a brand you fancy above all, and then start ordering these larger, economical amounts directly from the manufacturer.
Grade A Vermont maple syrup at 50¢ or less per ounce? Terrific!  :D

Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Friday, May 17, 2013, 1:29pm; Reply: 40
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
I allready hocked my left leg for a 1 pint jar of the real store. I'll keep it locked up with my one piece of real silver jewelry.

I have some savory sweet potato recipes but of course they  are loaded with dairy ;D

You went for the real stuff, eh?  Suddenly I'm very, very homesick for Vermont.  *wistful sigh*
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Friday, May 17, 2013, 1:37pm; Reply: 41
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
I have some savory sweet potato recipes but of course they  are loaded with dairy ;D


P.S.  How's a'come all your savory sweet potato recipes involve dairy?  Are they, like, mashed sweet potato type casserole deals?  How come people are not hip to simply cutting up the sweet potatos, rolling 'em around in a little olive oil, putting your fave savory spices on 'em (such as garlic, curry, sea salt, onion powder, adobo seasoning, whatEVAH), and popping 'em in the oven on a cookie sheet until FAB?  Or, a simple dinner of (I won't say chicken, as this thread is rife with B's *LOL*) your fave meat, cut up sweet potato and cut up onion, all baked (or roasted--whatever the precise term is--Brighid will kill me if I get it wrong!) together at 350-ish for however long it takes the meat to get done, by which point the sweet potatoes will have absorbed all that lovely FAT (I love being an O non!) and carmelized beautifully.  Now THAT is how ya make a sweet potater shine!  Diary be darned!  (Though one avoid I do eat is non-fat plain yogurt in many dressings and sauces, and it is good on sweet potato, I must say!)
Posted by: Brighid45, Friday, May 17, 2013, 1:46pm; Reply: 42
GCG is a B/Nomad. He's allowed dairy. Hence, recipes with dairy in them. :)

I'm finding as long as I use cultured dairy with no gums or stabilizers, occasional tastings are okay and don't make me tired or cause inflammation.

Maple syrup costs a fortune here too. Could be that last year's bad weather caused problems.
Posted by: yaeli, Friday, May 17, 2013, 1:58pm; Reply: 43
Quoted from Peppermint Twist
How come people are not hip to simply cutting up the sweet potatos, rolling 'em around in a little olive oil, putting your fave savory spices on 'em (such as garlic, curry, sea salt, onion powder, adobo seasoning, whatEVAH), and popping 'em in the oven on a cookie sheet until FAB?  Or, a simple dinner of (I won't say chicken, as this thread is rife with B's *LOL*) your fave meat, cut up sweet potato and cut up onion, all baked (or roasted--whatever the precise term is--Brighid will kill me if I get it wrong!) together at 350-ish for however long it takes the meat to get done, by which point the sweet potatoes will have absorbed all that lovely FAT (I love being an O non!) and carmelized beautifully.  Now THAT is how ya make a sweet potater shine!  Diary be darned!
  :D :D (clap)(clap) :K)  


Quoted from Peppermint Twist
(Though one avoid I do eat is non-fat plain yogurt in many dressings and sauces, and it is good on sweet potato, I must say!)
Mmm....  :o  (think)
Posted by: Jane, Friday, May 17, 2013, 2:06pm; Reply: 44
Sweet potatoes (especially the garnets) are good any way you prepare them.  When I was in Louisiana visiting my son's family the local restaurants served them with butter and brown sugar - yum.
I make them for the Jewish holidays a couple of different ways - tzimmes with prunes and carrots and seasonings.  The prunes add a wonderful flavor.
Posted by: yaeli, Friday, May 17, 2013, 3:22pm; Reply: 45
Quoted from Jane
The prunes add a wonderful flavor.
:) My father's family came from Lithuania, and potatoes & prunes zimmes is supposedly a traditional Lithuanian dish, so when my mother - a Jewish Hungarian - married him, she learnt to cook potatoes this way and mastered it. As kids we used to enjoy this lovely dish every Shabbat evening.

Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Friday, May 17, 2013, 6:35pm; Reply: 46
Quoted from Brighid45
GCG is a B/Nomad. He's allowed dairy. Hence, recipes with dairy in them. :)

I'm finding as long as I use cultured dairy with no gums or stabilizers, occasional tastings are okay and don't make me tired or cause inflammation.

Maple syrup costs a fortune here too. Could be that last year's bad weather caused problems.

Oh, I know gcg is allowed dairy (the lucky duck!), I'm just saying there are plenty of great savory ways of getting one's sweet potato on that don't involve dairy.  btw, I have found the same as you:  that I can use plain yogurt, for example, with no problem.  As an aside, with most things, I can't stand the "fat-free" or even low-fat versions, but with yogurt, I actually PREFER the non-fat.  I get organic, non-fat plain yogurt and use it primarily in salad dressing and sauces.  And tonight, I am actually going to have a very light supper consisting of just a smoothie made of non-fat yogurt, fresh pineapple, and pineapple juice.  Don't worry, I had protein at breakfast.  I'm doing a little "diet within a diet" as I'm calling it, where I'm trying (and succeeding, wu HUUU) to jumpstart my stalled weight loss (I only have a few more lbs to go, come on, bod!) by, dare I say it, eating less.  I was loathe to do that, and just kept trying to up my exercise and up my exercise, but after a year of plateauing, I'm now going this route:  instead of dinner, every other day I'm having either a smoothie, homemade fruit gelatin (using plain, organic beef gelatin, don't worry, peeps!), or just fruit (usually a gigantic piece of watermelon).  I am now a scant few lbs from where I want to be.  I was a tad nervous about going the "diet" route (i.e., eating less, as I like how i was eating!), because I do NOT want to get myself into a deprived state where my brain chemistry gets out of balance and I start craving.  But, so far, so good.  I'm being very mindful about it.  I'm ensuring I get enough protein, etc., on days when I do this.  ANYWAY, sorry, gcg, I'm digressing massively from the topic:  yep, I am with Briggie and find that a little dairy doesn't bother me.  All I ever have on a regular basis is the non-fat yogurt and, occasionally, a little pure cheese of some sort (cheddar, usually--if I could get some good ROQUEFORT up in hea', I wouldn't be averse!).

Roquefort would go great on sweet potato.  But then, roquefort would go great on ANYTHING.  Just hook me up to an intravenous drip and let 'er flow, baby!  ( :o Eeew, on second thought, eating it sounds infinitely better!)


Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Friday, May 17, 2013, 6:44pm; Reply: 47
Quoted from Jane
Sweet potatoes (especially the garnets) are good any way you prepare them.  When I was in Louisiana visiting my son's family the local restaurants served them with butter and brown sugar - yum.
I make them for the Jewish holidays a couple of different ways - tzimmes with prunes and carrots and seasonings.  The prunes add a wonderful flavor.

See, I don't like 'em with brown sugar--two sweets mushed together like that are too sweet, imho (unless we are talking sweet potater pie, somehow it is different then *lol*).  Case in point:  I went to Outback Steakhouse one time and was HORRIFED when, upon me ordering a sweet potato to go with my steak instead of a white potato, and ASSUMING that, since I was ordering it as a side for my steak, they would just prepare it like a baked potato, it came out absolutely smothered in brown sugar or possibly molasses or SOMETHING--it was hard to tell because it also had about a 6-inch TOWER of whipped cream on it and cinnamon or SOMETHING on top of that.  I went into shock and must have looked as horrified as I was, as the waiter figured out exactly what my silent reaction meant, without me saying anything--this was one of the rare times in my life that I've ever been rendered SPEECHLESS--and he said something like, omg, was that not how you wanted it?  I didn't speak, just remained frozen in horror with this expression:   :o .  "Because I can take it away and bring you one with nothing on it, just butter and salt as a side"  ...again, my reaction stayed a steady:   :o  He, bless his heart, wisked it away and brought me a plain sweet potato, which I promptly doused in BUTTAH and SALT, as God intended!

;D
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Friday, May 17, 2013, 6:47pm; Reply: 48
And possibly sour cream!   ;)
Posted by: Spring, Friday, May 17, 2013, 7:53pm; Reply: 49
I think by this time, after all the flak he has gotten about this recipe, I would be very reluctant to post another one if I were GCG! Y'all, he didn't even make up this recipe!! I do not like things very sweet at all unless it is fruit, but a whiff of sweetener on some sweet potatoes (not all) is just fine  with me. When I look at the amount of sweetener in some recipes even on this site, I get bugeyed! It is nothing to see one with a half cup or more of some type of sugar. Anyhow, I don't think GCG is losing any sleep over the ribbing, he just does his thing and comes out being one of the best cooks around!  ;D :D
Posted by: Jane, Friday, May 17, 2013, 8:43pm; Reply: 50
Yaeli, to digress, my father's family is from Lithuania too - Meretz.

PT, when I was visiting my son's family, we went to Outback because at the other restaurant we went to, they put too much Cajun spice on everything.  I had the sweet potato and they brought the butter with cinnamon and whatever on the side.  They have a great "allergy" menu there with a flourless brownie even.....had to indulge.  Not sure what was in it but since returning from that trip, I've been fighting a flare of my UC.  Could be just from the travelling or time or year or maybe it was just time.  Who knows.  I also had a gluten free white pizza with very few minor avoids.  Topping was cheese (some avoids there) and pesto - OMG so delicious.  I don't think I've had a pizza in 15 years.  WFs sells it and I have one sitting in the freezer now that I'm saving for a special occasion.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Friday, May 17, 2013, 9:07pm; Reply: 51
Quoted from Spring
I think by this time, after all the flak he has gotten about this recipe, I would be very reluctant to post another one if I were GCG! Y'all, he didn't even make up this recipe!! I do not like things very sweet at all unless it is fruit, but a whiff of sweetener on some sweet potatoes (not all) is just fine  with me. When I look at the amount of sweetener in some recipes even on this site, I get bugeyed! It is nothing to see one with a half cup or more of some type of sugar. Anyhow, I don't think GCG is losing any sleep over the ribbing, he just does his thing and comes out being one of the best cooks around!  ;D :D


No problem this ain;t my first rodeo. My job requires me to testify in court regularly and be grilled by attorneys. People say they couldn't do that and I say "what are they going to do, take away Christmas?".
Posted by: san j, Friday, May 17, 2013, 9:22pm; Reply: 52
Quoted from Peppermint Twist
Oh, I know gcg is allowed dairy (the lucky duck!), I'm just saying there are plenty of great savory ways of getting one's sweet potato on that don't involve dairy.

Oh, I so hear ya, PT, B/Nomad that I am, too!
Just 'cuz we *can* eat dairy doesn't mean we have to!
I really ditto your taste for the roasted-with-oil-and-herbs/spices-and-the-all-important-salt version.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, May 17, 2013, 9:43pm; Reply: 53
I've got sweet potatoes in the oven right now, cubed,  with olive oil, sea salt, onion powder, garlic powder, and paprika. And another, smaller dish of white potatoes (white potato, really) prepared in the exact same way, for my picky B son who doesn't like sweet potatoes. If he did, I'd never buy white potatoes!

I've also got 2 turkey thighs roasting, and will put up some white rice and green beans in other pans too. I prefer brown rice, but Jack likes the white rice better, so we have that on Shabbos.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Saturday, May 18, 2013, 12:21am; Reply: 54
Well you probably won't read this till sundown tomorrow but that sounds great. Shalom.
Posted by: Spring, Saturday, May 18, 2013, 5:15am; Reply: 55
Well, Ruthie, I wish I could taste a bite of your sweet potatoes. I might even surprise myself and like them! But my favorite way to eat them, so far, is with ghee and a tiny bit of sea salt. Yummy!(drool)
Posted by: Spring, Saturday, May 18, 2013, 5:19am; Reply: 56
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
No problem this ain;t my first rodeo. My job requires me to testify in court regularly and be grilled by attorneys. People say they couldn't do that and I say "what are they going to do, take away Christmas?".


I might feel like some of those "people" if I hadn't worked with lawyers! ;D
Posted by: yaeli, Saturday, May 18, 2013, 6:05am; Reply: 57
Quoted from Jane
Yaeli, to digress, my father's family is from Lithuania too - Meretz.
:) :K)

My grandparents and their kids lived in a village near Kovno.  :)

Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Monday, May 20, 2013, 7:43pm; Reply: 58
Quoted from Jane
PT, when I was visiting my son's family, we went to Outback because at the other restaurant we went to, they put too much Cajun spice on everything.  I had the sweet potato and they brought the butter with cinnamon and whatever on the side.  They have a great "allergy" menu there with a flourless brownie even.....had to indulge.

I find that many chain restaurants that have "gluten-free" menus do the exact OPPOSITE of promoting that and, in fact, you would have to really be a consumer like most of us on this site are, i.e., EXTREMELY prone to suss things out for yourself, to even know they have such a menu.  At both the local Olive Garden and Outback, which have gluten-free choices, no menus are displayed, nor does it state on the regular menu that such an alternate menu exists.  Like, the Outback for example:  I called one here and asked about the gluten-free menu and they said they didn't really have that, even though it's on the national web site, sorry.  Worst of all (no--I lie:  second worst of all, I'll get to worst of all in a sec  ;D ), from the people who design these menus to the management of individual restaurants to the waitstaff/servers on the floor, these chains seem the OPPOSITE of well-trained or educated regarding people with food allergies, which could result in SERIOUS liability issues for these chains.  Olive Garden, for example, lists their Caesar Chicken Salad on the gluten-free menu, yet the chicken is very lightly BREADED.  You wouldn't even notice it, it is usually so light, UNLESS you were me (or you, or any one of us who NEVER eats wheat and somehow therefore can detect it better *lol*).  I could tell, in my case, that the chicken was holding onto the dressing just a little bit too well, and had a certain, admittedly GOOD taste and texture that it wouldn't have had without being at least lightly floured/breaded.  I asked the server and it was confirmed.  I was then told that, if I wanted to specify that I don't want that in future, "we can wash it off".  I was like, why not just don't put it ON?  "Oh, it comes like that, but we have one customer who always asks for it washed off."  Yeeeeeeah:  why do I not find that option appetizing in the slightest?

I've ordered a burger with NO BUN several times at the Outback and had it come out on a bun.  Not a huge deal for me to take it off, although some of the toppings (like cheese) melt off into the bun and are lost, but for someone with a true wheat allergy (which I always LIE and say I have at the outset, so they should treat me like someone with a wheat allergy), you could not simply remove the bun, as you could still have a reaction.  I've had them tell me several times "Can't you just remove the bun?"  NO, that's why I ordered it with no bun in the clearest possible terms.

>:(

I literally hate going out to eat anymore.  Unless I'm going to an authentic Asian place, I hate it.  All these chain restaurants around me can take their buns and shove 'em where the lightly breaded chicken don't shine!
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Monday, May 20, 2013, 7:52pm; Reply: 59
Oh, and I should post sometime about my latest experience at an authentic Asian place, wherein I got BURNED with horrifying ingredients in something, even there.  Real quick like a bunny, because I only have a minute, literally:  I went to this Vietnamese place, had a great meal, BUT ordered what was billed as a "smoothie-tea hybrid" that was blueberry, basically.  I thought, that sounds like an interesting, healthy beverage.  WRONG!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  It was PRE-PACKAGED (with a sealed aluminum lid no less) and was basically a glorified 7-11 slurpee!  Well, I Googled it later and was horrified to learn that these things are "trendy" but basically are made with "banned ingredients" from China and are basically nothing but Chinese drywall and plasticizers!  Just kidding on the drywall...but not the plasticizers!   :o  Gotta go, but NEVER order anything called a "Bo bo tea" at a Vietnamese place.  It ain't tea, it ain't a smoothie, it is nothing but "banned ingredients" in a delicious format!  I KNEW something was wrong because it was sooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo sweet that it couldn't be natural.  Silly me, I was worried about corn syrup.  Corn syrup seems like a health food compared to what I Googled!

*sigh*  Like I said:  homemade is best anymore!
Posted by: Jane, Monday, May 20, 2013, 8:12pm; Reply: 60
The Outbacks I've been to were very good about their "allergy" menu.  I just steak and sweet potato and then the flourless brownie.  
I've made those at home and they are delicious.  I make them with almond butter, chocolate chips, unsweetened cocoa, agave, sea salt - it's an Elana's Pantry recipe but I added extra chocolate chips and undercook them so they aren't too dry....delicious.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, May 21, 2013, 4:40pm; Reply: 61
Oh, Jane, ANYTHING with almondbutter is wonderful.  But alas, as I gained 5 to 7 lbs this winter (which I've subsequently already shed again--thank GOD!) and narrowed the culprit down to the fact that I was on a kick of putting almondbutter into EVERYTHING (sauces, salad dressings, etc.), I have cut it out of my diet for the time being.  Right now, I'm really trying hard to get off the plateau I've been on for over a year now.  I only have about five more lbs to lose to get to where I really, ultimately want to be!  I pity anything that gets in my way.  Right now, it's lots of walking and homemade fruit gelatin *lol*.  I haven't come this far to stop here.  Here is good.  Here is fabulous.  But, in the immortal words of Sawyer from "LOST":  "You and me ain't done, Zeke."   ;D
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, May 21, 2013, 4:41pm; Reply: 62
P.S.  Jane, those flourless brownies do sound FABULOUS, I gotta say!
Posted by: Jane, Tuesday, May 21, 2013, 5:52pm; Reply: 63
I made some to take to a brunch but then I ate too many so I've stopped making them for a while.  Yes, they are fattening, but at least healthy fattening.  I eat way too much almond butter.  I buy the very expensive stuff you grind yourself at WFs.  It's $6.99/lb.  When I was visiting my son and his family in Louisiana, the Fresh Market there was selling it for $8.99/lb OMG.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, May 21, 2013, 7:14pm; Reply: 64
“I made some to take to a brunch but then I ate too many so I've stopped making them for a while.  Yes, they are fattening, but at least healthy fattening.”

True!  Better those than the Pamela’s cookies we were on a kick over some years back!

“I eat way too much almond butter.  I buy the very expensive stuff you grind yourself at WFs.  It's $6.99/lb.  When I was visiting my son and his family in Louisiana, the Fresh Market there was selling it for $8.99/lb OMG.”

Yeah, that is the kind I get:  the very expensive kind that my HFS grinds itself and sells.  Actually, even the jarred kind is terribly expensive.  Nutbutters have just gone through the roof, particularly almondbutter.  Anyway, like I said, I was just getting way TOO into it this winter and, if anyone out there reading this is trying to GAIN weight, which every so often someone will come to the board and say they want tips on how to do:  THINK ALMONDBUTTER (or any nutbutter)!  This winter, I was really getting into sauces and dressings with this elixir of the Gods mixed in, omg:  wonderful!  But I somehow gained SEVEN POUNDS, which sent me into a PANIC.  When you’ve been as obese as I was, when that scale starts going up and up, nothing less than panic can set in.  Anyway, I am really proud and amazed that I was able to lose it again and lose it quickly, so here I am back at the plateau I’ve been at for a YEAR *lol*, but I’ll take it!  I’m healthy.  I’m just trying to get to an even 100 lbs lost, as if I do, then if I fluctuate by five lbs, I’ll still be within what the “experts” (bleep ‘em!) say is my healthy range.

Once I get into “maintenance” mode, I’ll probably have almondbutter again occasionally, but for now, no can do.  I’ve got my eyes on the prize, BIG TIME.  These last few pounds are WAY harder to take off than the first 96, seriously, but they are COMING OFF, if I have to TAKE them off—oh, wait:  I do *lol*!
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, May 22, 2013, 12:08am; Reply: 65
I keep forgetting to use nut butters in salad dressing! Glad y'all reminded me! I just like something for a change now and then. You have any good suggestions for a good combination, PT? I made some using cottage cheese (thoroughly blended), oil, a tad of lemon, sea salt and a lot of herbs - still needs something. Tahini might work...
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