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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  BBQ ideas
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, April 23, 2013, 10:19pm
We just got a new barbecue last week, after not having one for over a year. Prior to that, we only used the BBQ about 2-3 times a year.

It occurred to me that it would be very convenient to cook on the BBQ on days that Hannah is working in the yard, whether it's "yardwork" or "homework while sitting on the grass." I could see us wanting to use the BBQ several times a week in nice weather.

Last Thursday, I baked whole sweet potatoes for the Os, a whole white potato for Jack, plus beef burgers and turkey hot dogs (not 100% compliant) and a salad. This was a tasty meal, but not one I'm willing to make more than once a week. If I'm going to cook dinner on the BBQ 3-4 times a week, we'll need some more variety.

Remember that we keep kosher, so the BBQ can only be used for meat meals (since we've already put meat directly on the grills.) We've got a few Os and a B in the family. And my kitchen is a flight of stairs away from the back patio, so I  need foods that don't take a lot of kitchen prep, or can easily be carried downstairs after prepping and before grilling.

I'm also used to having grains with dinner, and I'm not sure how to easily incorporate grains into a BBQ meal when I'm not eating corn on the cob nor eating my burger on a bun.
Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, April 23, 2013, 10:56pm; Reply: 1
Can you mix meat and fish?

Can you have vegetables cooked on the grill and eaten with the meal?

Shish kabobs are a welcome variety food for summer.  They can be made with compliant veggies and meats, marinated - if desired, and grilled.

If you can't put the veggies directly on the grill, you can put them in a flat baking pan and set it on the grill to "bake" them, then cook the meat.

Almost any meat can be cooked on the grill, but obviously the more tender cuts are going to be more tender when grilled.  We've even done a whole small turkey on the grill with indirect heat - putting the turkey on one side of the grill while the burner on the other side was burning on med./low...
Posted by: san j, Wednesday, April 24, 2013, 12:34am; Reply: 2
http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?b-GC/m-1360733793/s-0/

Over two dozen posts on the topic from a couple of months ago.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Wednesday, April 24, 2013, 10:27pm; Reply: 3
I poste a recipe for Morrocan Turkey legs a couple of months ago. The garlic honey glaze does have apple cider vinegar in it and the brine has sugar.

http://www.dadamo.com/cgi-bin/Blah/Blah.pl?m-1342224871/
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, May 3, 2013, 8:09pm; Reply: 4
Already we've  branched out a bit, since Leah had time to help with food prep.

I bought one of those plastic burger-pressers, and now Jack is willing to eat the burgers I made! I'll be buying fewer hot dogs in the future. :)

I tried turkey burgers last week, but they were rather mushy and parts stuck to the grill when I turned them over. Any tips for making ground turkey work better on the grill?

Leah came up with the idea of making veggie kebabs, and found we had some skewers in the house (though I have no clue when I bought them!) She cut up veggies for the kebabs: mushrooms, red peppers, and zucchini. She thought of using onions AFTER we were done cooking, so we'll do that next time. She used some hot dog slices on some of the skewers, but would like to use whole pieces of poultry next time.

Leah also thought of using chicken or turkey cutlets, marinated in some kind of BBQ sauce.  We could cook them right on the  grill and/or put them on the kebabs. She wants a traditional tomato-based sauce, but I can't eat tomatoes. We were thinking maybe make two kinds: chicken with tomato-based sauce and turkey with something compliant for me and Jack. I'm not worried about trace amounts getting from one food on the grill to another- I'm not THAT sensitive to tomato and Jack isn't that sensitive to chicken. I just don't want a full portion of tomato anything.
Posted by: san j, Friday, May 3, 2013, 8:47pm; Reply: 5
Oil is what prevents sticking.
Beef, for instance, is generally far fattier than poultry, which generally needs a marinade.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, May 3, 2013, 9:05pm; Reply: 6
So coat the turkey burgers with oil after shaping,  before putting on the  grill?
Posted by: san j, Friday, May 3, 2013, 9:13pm; Reply: 7
Are you seasoning these turkey burgers, ruthiegirl?
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, May 3, 2013, 9:19pm; Reply: 8
I blended spices in with the ground turkey before shaping them.
Posted by: ABJoe, Saturday, May 4, 2013, 1:04am; Reply: 9
Quoted from ruthiegirl
So coat the turkey burgers with oil after shaping,  before putting on the grill?

Or add some oil in with the meat when you spice it and mix altogether...  Or oil the grill a bit...

It is also good to start with a hot grill.  They stick less than if I put them on before the grill is good and warm.
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Saturday, May 4, 2013, 1:09am; Reply: 10
Quoted from ruthiegirl
So coat the turkey burgers with oil after shaping,  before putting on the  grill?


Wet a rag with olive oil, pick it up with tongs and quickly rub it over the hot grill before adding the meat.
Posted by: jeanb, Saturday, May 4, 2013, 1:12am; Reply: 11
Dip any type of burger patties in ice water and they will grill better.  Turkey burgers need to have the grill oiled.  Turkey is pretty lean, so they will have a tendency to dry out and stick.  I often mix buffalo with fattier beef or beef sausage to increase the fat content of buffalo for juicier meat.  I sometimes will start turkey burgers in the  oven and then finish on grill so they don't dry out.
Posted by: Adam, Saturday, May 4, 2013, 2:04pm; Reply: 12
Maybe try mixing in some ground flax in the turkey.  It'll add both some fat and fiber.
Posted by: jeanb, Saturday, May 4, 2013, 2:08pm; Reply: 13
I just read an article that adding zucchini to turkey burgers will keep them moist.  I tend to add sweet potato for flavor, but I think the vegetables adds moisture and keeps them juicy.
Posted by: san j, Saturday, May 4, 2013, 6:39pm; Reply: 14
Ruthiegirl: The flavor of meat-fat is what makes grilled meat especially tantalizing.
For that reason I concur with jean b re the use of a fattier beef, for instance, than buffalo, when she is grilling red-meat burgers.
Consider dark-meat-only turkey in your grilled turkey burgers; these will have a substantially higher ratio of fat than a more "mixed" ground turkey meat will.

Also to be considered: In recognition of your Jewish culinary habits, I'm assuming you are buying kosher turkey. Ask your butcher to provide you with turkey schmaltz, and keep it in the freezer for just this purpose; that way you can even use white/mixed turkey meat and get a more flavorful result than you would with a vegetable-oil-marinade.  ;)

P.S. Remembering your question: And yes - you can incorporate the schmaltz right into your burger meat before forming the patties, for better "marbling" than you'd get by simply greasing surfaces.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Sunday, May 5, 2013, 6:59pm; Reply: 15
I always preheat the grill. I put in the sweet potatoes and white potato about an hour before cooking the meat (since the meat cooks faster) so the grill is always preheated before adding the meat.

I wouldn't want to start the turkey burgers in the oven before grilling. The whole point of using the outside grill is to NOT heat up the oven!


That's a good idea about the turkey schmaltz! I actually have some in my freezer from the last time I roasted a whole turkey. I would have frozen it in smaller portions if I'd realized what I'd be using it for (last time I used it to make a crust for a turkey pot pi, and used the whole thing at once.) I'm not sure I'd like the flavor of flax in a burger, though I may try a small amount anyway, with lots of spices.
Posted by: ABJoe, Sunday, May 5, 2013, 7:14pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from ruthiegirl
I always preheat the grill. I put in the sweet potatoes and white potato about an hour before cooking the meat (since the meat cooks faster) so the grill is always preheated before adding the meat.

Any fat on the grill would be burned off by the time the meat is put on, so you really need to oil the grill prior to putting the turkey on...
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Sunday, May 5, 2013, 7:16pm; Reply: 17
So you mean, preheat grill, go prepare veggies in foil, put veggies in grill, go do other stuff, come down with the meat, and oil the grill immediately before putting the patties on?

Would cooking spray work or should I use the oil-on-a-rag method?
Posted by: ABJoe, Sunday, May 5, 2013, 7:33pm; Reply: 18
Quoted from ruthiegirl
So you mean, preheat grill, go prepare veggies in foil, put veggies in grill, go do other stuff, come down with the meat, and oil the grill immediately before putting the patties on?

Would cooking spray work or should I use the oil-on-a-rag method?

Yes, the grill needs to be oiled soon before the meat goes on or the oil burns off before the meat goes on...

Some cooking sprays have a flammable propellant and therefore would NOT be acceptable for use on / around a lit grill...  Oil on a rag /paper towel is a much better option if there is any doubt...
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, May 5, 2013, 9:06pm; Reply: 19
make a faux corn bread using quinoa and the basic foccacia recipe
Posted by: san j, Sunday, May 5, 2013, 9:14pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from ruthiegirl
That's a good idea about the turkey schmaltz! I actually have some in my freezer from the last time I roasted a whole turkey. I would have frozen it in smaller portions if I'd realized what I'd be using it for (last time I used it to make a crust for a turkey pot pi, and used the whole thing at once.) I'm not sure I'd like the flavor of flax in a burger, though I may try a small amount anyway, with lots of spices.


The other thing about flaxseed oil, ruthiegirl, is that it's better uncooked.

As for the schmaltz: If you find yourself really grokking to grilled turkey this spring/summer, you can ask your butcher to set aside for you, rather than discard, turkey schmaltz, and you can pick it up when you shop. It may very well be that when they butcher and grind, they normally dispose of a fair amount of the fat? It's worth an ask -- it'd likely be a freebie, so why not?

Glad you like the idea; it's a natural fit.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Sunday, May 5, 2013, 11:01pm; Reply: 21
I don't have an actual "kosher butcher" I go to. I buy Empire Kosher ground turkey in packages. I do, however, also cook whole (small) turkeys once every month or two, plus I save bones from when I cook up a half breast and a leg. I get much more fat from the whole turkeys, though I could also skim the fat off the broth when I make turkey soup from whichever bones I have on hand. I currently have some frozen turkey fat, left over from the last time I roasted a whole turkey. I don't think it would cause problems to mix cooked fat into the raw meat.
Posted by: san j, Sunday, May 5, 2013, 11:18pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from ruthiegirl
I don't have an actual "kosher butcher" I go to. I buy Empire Kosher ground turkey in packages. I do, however, also cook whole (small) turkeys once every month or two, plus I save bones from when I cook up a half breast and a leg. I get much more fat from the whole turkeys, though I could also skim the fat off the broth when I make turkey soup from whichever bones I have on hand. I currently have some frozen turkey fat, left over from the last time I roasted a whole turkey. I don't think it would cause problems to mix cooked fat into the raw meat.

Mmm, you're making me hungry.
I bet you make great soup. Something tells me...

Oh, I don't think there's any problem using pre-cooked animal fat; most of us have kept jars of cooking fat (including bacon grease, which you wouldn't know about :o) in the fridge...

I was just advising not to cook flax oil.
Enjoy your new grill.
And - speaking of "cooking up half breast and a leg", ruthiegirl, these are awesome on the grill. Be sure to consult gulfcoastguy's recipe(s): He's the grillmeister around here.  ;)
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, May 6, 2013, 12:15am; Reply: 23
Well my best recipe for the grill so far is the Moroccan turkey legs. The one that I have been waiting to try with a half breast(if it ever stops raining) is unfortunately not kosher. Just be sure to brine the turkey before grilling. A basic brine recipe is 1/4 cup, salt, 1/4 cup sugar 1 gallon of water. Heat the water and desolve the salt and sugar in it. Let the brine cool and soak the poultry in it for at leat 4 hours though over night is better. I'm sure any sweetener like honey, maple syrup, or Maybe agave would do in place of the sugar though the taste would change. Hmmm? Maple syrup? That just flung a craving on me as we say round here.
Posted by: yaeli, Monday, May 6, 2013, 6:53am; Reply: 24
Quoted from jeanb
I just read an article that adding zucchini to turkey burgers will keep them moist.  I tend to add sweet potato for flavor, but I think the vegetables adds moisture and keeps them juicy.
Sounds brilliant!

Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, May 6, 2013, 1:00pm; Reply: 25
I have no interest in grilling whole turkey legs or half-breasts. I typically roast those in the oven for Shabbos, when we're eating inside and the oven is on anyway. For the grill, I want to prepare foods that are already small enough for single portions.

Our apartment is upstairs and the grill is in the backyard, a flight of stairs away from my kosher kitchen. We use paper plates and plastic utensils for eating BBQ meals (although the BBQ tongs and spatula are kept downstairs with the grill, and metal serving utensils are often brought downstairs as well.) We typically prepare the food for grilling upstairs (shaping burger patties, cutting veggies and putting them on skewers, etc) then carry the uncooked, grill-ready food downstairs.
Posted by: BCgal, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 12:14am; Reply: 26
I've cooked a big slab of salmon in the barbecue.  But I use the barbecue like an oven, in that I put the fish in an 8x12 cake pan and place it in there.  Less clean up of the grill and it keeps the heat outside.
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 12:28am; Reply: 27
Quoted from BCgal
I've cooked a big slab of salmon in the barbecue.  But I use the barbecue like an oven, in that I put the fish in an 8x12 cake pan and place it in there.  Less clean up of the grill and it keeps the heat outside.

Have you considered a cedar plank?  :)

Posted by: BCgal, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 12:37am; Reply: 28
San j :  I've heard of that but have never looked into it.
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 12:43am; Reply: 29
Quoted from BCgal
San j :  I've heard of that but have never looked into it.

And you call yourself a BCgal.  ;)  :D
p.s. google, darling.

Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 2:33am; Reply: 30
Quoted from BCgal
Less clean up of the grill and it keeps the heat outside.

The whole reason I use the grill for so much cooking is that all I need is a wire brush to clean the grill grate and it is ready for the next use...   ;)   ;D   :o
Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 2:34am; Reply: 31
Quoted from san j
Have you considered a cedar plank?  :)

Yummy!
Posted by: BCgal, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 3:54am; Reply: 32
Yes that's true about the clean up, but sometimes it's nice to just leave it in there for the allotted time and not have to keep running out there to make sure it's not burning.  
Posted by: jeanb, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 12:17pm; Reply: 33
BC Gal you have to try cedar planks for your salmon.  I have done a sirloin on one, incredible flavour.  I have found cedar paper for wrapping fish, again, easy clean up and beautiful presentation.
Posted by: Adam, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 12:56pm; Reply: 34
Tips on how to make grilling safer for your health:

http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/07/02/how.make.grilling.safe/index.html
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 6:19pm; Reply: 35
ruthiegirl:
Keep us posted on your progress as grillmistress: I hope you really enjoy it. Something delightfully primal about it - especially for the O.  ;)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 6:32pm; Reply: 36
Some of those "healthy tips" seemed ridiculous to me- microwave the meat before  grilling it? I don't think so! And the advice to clean the grill before using seems like common sense to me.

We're grilling again tonight. I didn't  buy any hot dogs, but we do have ground beef, ground turkey, and chicken cutlets in the house (Costco shopping trip this afternoon.) Jack liked the beef burgers, so I'll make those tonight, plus some kind of chicken thing. Not sure yet whether we'll put them on kebabs or just grill directly- probably a little bit of both. The veggie kebabs were a big hit, so that's definitely a "BBQ staple" at our house now!
Posted by: san j, Tuesday, May 7, 2013, 8:07pm; Reply: 37
Grilled fruit can also be good.
I like pineapple on the grill.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, May 8, 2013, 12:02am; Reply: 38
The chicken stuck to the grill and was hard to turn, even though I'd sprayed the grill with cooking spray before putting it on. Some parts got burnt before I was able to turn them. Next time, I'll use oil in the marinade, rather than just spices and agave. We're thinking that next time we'll just use olive oil and spices (like we use on the kebabs) and serve with a honey mustard sauce, rather than trying for a honey-mustard marinade. The chicken also cooked up much faster than I realized it would- I'm still learning which food items to put on in what order.
Posted by: md, Wednesday, May 8, 2013, 1:36am; Reply: 39
Has anyone here ever used a Himalayan Salt plank for grilling? I almost bought one at a rummage sale; but we don't have a grill, and I wasn't sure how to use it.
Posted by: jeanb, Wednesday, May 8, 2013, 2:38am; Reply: 40
Quoted Text
Has anyone here ever used a Himalayan Salt plank for grilling? I almost bought one at a rummage sale; but we don't have a grill, and I wasn't sure how to use it.



I haven't used one, I have used a hot stone however.  The stone is great when entertaining, not good if you need to get dinner on the table now.


Here is a link to how to use the Salt Plank.

http://www.atthemeadow.com/shop/Resources/How-to-Cook-on-Pink-Himalayan-Salt-Blocks
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Wednesday, May 8, 2013, 3:59am; Reply: 41
I've seen shrimp grilled on a slab of Himalayan salt before. It cooked well but the food was over salty for my taste.
Posted by: Easy E, Thursday, May 9, 2013, 11:38pm; Reply: 42
You can use pecan or oak branch cuttings (fresh cut or dried) and at the end of the grilling, throw them in and the smoke will give the meat a sweet smoked flavor.  It works with any type of meat (beef, lamb, chicken, fresh game, fish, etc.)  Other hard woods may work similar, but we just have oak and pecan we use where i live.
Posted by: san j, Friday, May 10, 2013, 2:35am; Reply: 43
Food Network has 43 recipes for Grilled Turkey Burgers here:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipe-collections/turkey-burger/index.html

Bobby Flay's recipe for honey-mustard burgers looks good for you.
Avail yourself of the expertise of these chefs, but, of course, *adapt* recipes that are "Almosts".
And have fun.
Posted by: san j, Sunday, May 19, 2013, 3:29am; Reply: 44
Another way to use the grill is to make a foil packet and fill it with stuff, such as:
"50 Things to Grill in Foil"

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes-and-cooking/50-things-to-grill-in-foil/index.html

There was a lot here that can be adapted to any-which-pantry.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, May 20, 2013, 3:42pm; Reply: 45
I did the foil packet thingie with onions a while ago. It came out  good, but was kind of a lot of work. The veggie skewers (that include onions) seems to work much better for us.

At this point, we've gotten chicken cutlets and beef burgers to work, along with the turkey hot dogs. I think that, with 3 kinds of meat to alternate (usually making 2 each time I cook) I think we've got enough variety for a summer's worth of barbecues. I'll stop the chicken and switch to all turkey once Leah moves out (and also when she's in camp) because she's the only one who prefers chicken. Jack isn't allowed chicken at all, and it's only neutral for me while turkey is a bennie.

I may or may not play around with adding turkey fat to ground turkey- the alternative is to use the ground turkey for meatballs in gravy on days I cook indoors, and not bother using it on the grill at all.
Posted by: san j, Monday, May 20, 2013, 7:40pm; Reply: 46
Sounds like you're becoming quite the GrillMistress, ruthiegirl.

As for favoring skewers over foil packets, keep the latter option in mind for when you find you need more thorough cooking - i.e., if the skewered vegetables are more surface than deep-cooked - in a baking rather than broiling way. If you need more moisture-retention but don't want to be running inside to deal with an oven or with covered pots on the stove, the little foil "oven" comes in very handy, IMO.

Keep enjoying your O heritage, O Fire Lady.  ;)
Posted by: san j, Monday, May 27, 2013, 11:01pm; Reply: 47
So, RG: Are you wow-ing 'em behind that grill on our nation's Day for it?
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 5:30pm; Reply: 48
Quoted from ruthiegirl
I tried turkey burgers last week, but they were rather mushy and parts stuck to the grill when I turned them over. Any tips for making ground turkey work better on the grill?

I cook a lot of ground turkey (not on the grill, but I use ground turkey a lot) and, last time I bought some, I accidentally bought the packages labeled "99% lean" instead of "94% lean".  Ruthie, what a difference that 5% fat makes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  I will NEVER buy the 99% lean again.  I managed to optimize it by putting more olive oil than I usually use in the frying pan, AND adding some vegetable stock once it started browning, all in a DESPERATE attempt to keep it from drying out too much.  It turned out okay but nowhere near as good as the 94% lean.  Why would ANYONE other than perhaps a Type A1 secretor EVER want 99% lean turkey meat?  Why not just buy shredded cardboard instead and be done with it?  But I digress:  my point is, the less fat is in there, the more it is going to not hold together well.  So go for ground turkey with at LEAST 5% fat in it, you don't want any of this 99% lean nonsense, that is like some last vestige of the dangerous low-fat/fat-free food era, which mercifully long ago went slinking out of the room with its discredited tail between its legs.

One thing you could also do is add a smidge of ghee mixed with olive oil (the ghee will give the olive oil a much higher smoke point) to the ground turkey and mix it in before forming the patties.  Good luck and happy grilling!   8)

Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 5:36pm; Reply: 49
P.S.
Quoted from san j
Ask your butcher to provide you with turkey schmaltz, and keep it in the freezer for just this purpose; that way you can even use white/mixed turkey meat and get a more flavorful result than you would with a vegetable-oil-marinade.  ;)

Ooooh, schmaltz, what a great idea!  And being Type O, she could use either turkey or chicken schmaltz.  It's a wonderful idea because it obviously complements the poultry meat perfectly, AND it has a very high smoke point, perfect for grilling.  Plus it tastes dang fabulous.  Ummmmm, I'm getting hungry!

Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 5:46pm; Reply: 50
P.P.S.  Two final little points:  Ruthie, I would not use cooking spray, that stuff is nasty.  Just brush your grill as gcg suggested with oil/schmaltz/some kind of FAT prior to use.  Second point, Empire brand is kosher, yet imho uses very poor quality ingredients and usually has additives in their frozen meats.  Still, I see your quandry, as that may be the only kosher brand available to you, and since you follow Jewish law, kosher meat trumps organic/possibly purer and/or higher quality in other ways, if you can't have both.  Still, I just wanted to alert you to the fact that, if you scrutinize the label on Empire frozen poultry, often there are, like, solutions or other additives snuck in there.  But I can see where that might be the only choice for you in terms of kosher meat, so I do understand.  Back to the cooking spray:  that needs to GO.  Go with a good quality oil or natural animal fat.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 6:10pm; Reply: 51
The  ground turkey (and I NEVER  buy the 99% lean kind!)has "natural flavorings" added. I emailed the company and they verified that the "natural flavorings" are nothing more than rosemary oil, which is compliant for all of us.

I'm not about to mix ghee into ground turkey, because that would no longer  be kosher. Poultry counts as "meat" in Jewish law, but fish does not. Meat and dairy products can't be combined in kosher foods, even meats (such as turkey) that are not from mammals.

I wouldn't mix chicken fat into my turkey burgers because I'm also feeding these to my type B son.

I've had great results with frying turkey burgers, as well as with using ground turkey to make meatballs. I may just use less ground turkey over the summer, and resume buying it when I'm ready to cook indoors again. We had good results cooking chicken cutlets on the grill, and I'm sure the same technique would work just as well with turkey tenderloins. I cut the meat into strips, coated in seasoned olive oil, cooked right on the grill, then served with honey mustard sauce. Cooking with the honey mustard sauce didn't work so well- cooking with just the olive oil (and spices) works better, then use the sauce at the table.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 6:50pm; Reply: 52
Quoted from ruthiegirl
The  ground turkey (and I NEVER  buy the 99% lean kind!)has "natural flavorings" added. I emailed the company and they verified that the "natural flavorings" are nothing more than rosemary oil, which is compliant for all of us.

Excellent!  Good for you, too, for emailing the company--it is good when companies we buy from realize that we CARE about the ingredients and are reading the label and making decisions based on it.  Rosemary oil actually sounds rather beneficial to my semi-trained ear...if what they tell you is to be believed...what, I'm a skeptic/cynic, what can I tell ya?
Quoted from ruthiegirl
I'm not about to mix ghee into ground turkey, because that would no longer  be kosher. Poultry counts as "meat" in Jewish law, but fish does not. Meat and dairy products can't be combined in kosher foods, even meats (such as turkey) that are not from mammals.

Oooops--I didn't think*  :B !  Sorry about the ghee suggestion!  I LOVE san_j's schmaltz idea so much more anyway.

* (I knew turkey counts as meat, for sure, but for some reason, I was thinking of ghee/butter as an animal fat and not associating it as "dairy", even though it is fat from the milk--DUH.  My bad!)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 8:11pm; Reply: 53
It can be hard to keep all the kosher rules straight when you don't live it. My own grandmother suggested we serve meat and dairy at separate tables at my bridal shower, totally not "getting" that they can't be served at the same meal, no matter how many tables you use! (Her health was declining rapidly by that point. She died less than a year after my wedding.)
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Wednesday, May 29, 2013, 12:21am; Reply: 54
Quoted from Peppermint Twist

I cook a lot of ground turkey (not on the grill, but I use ground turkey a lot) and, last time I bought some, I accidentally bought the packages labeled "99% lean" instead of "94% lean".  Ruthie, what a difference that 5% fat makes!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  I will NEVER buy the 99% lean again.  I managed to optimize it by putting more olive oil than I usually use in the frying pan, AND adding some vegetable stock once it started browning, all in a DESPERATE attempt to keep it from drying out too much.  It turned out okay but nowhere near as good as the 94% lean.  Why would ANYONE other than perhaps a Type A1 secretor EVER want 99% lean turkey meat?  Why not just buy shredded cardboard instead and be done with it?  But I digress:  my point is, the less fat is in there, the more it is going to not hold together well.  So go for ground turkey with at LEAST 5% fat in it, you don't want any of this 99% lean nonsense, that is like some last vestige of the dangerous low-fat/fat-free food era, which mercifully long ago went slinking out of the room with its discredited tail between its legs.

One thing you could also do is add a smidge of ghee mixed with olive oil (the ghee will give the olive oil a much higher smoke point) to the ground turkey and mix it in before forming the patties.  Good luck and happy grilling!   8)



Shredding carrots in a food processor and mixing it into the burger seems to help it hold togather and adds moisture. That's one of the things in the meatloaf recipe that Cpcat67 gave me five or six years ago. Here it is from recipebase  http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipedepictor7x.cgi?1401
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Wednesday, May 29, 2013, 7:33pm; Reply: 55
Quoted from ruthiegirl
It can be hard to keep all the kosher rules straight when you don't live it. My own grandmother suggested we serve meat and dairy at separate tables at my bridal shower, totally not "getting" that they can't be served at the same meal, no matter how many tables you use!

Well, thanks for your graciousness at my brain fog.   :K)
Quoted from gulfcoastguy
Shredding carrots in a food processor and mixing it into the burger seems to help it hold togather and adds moisture. That's one of the things in the meatloaf recipe that Cpcat67 gave me five or six years ago. Here it is from recipebase  http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipedepictor7x.cgi?1401

Brilliant, gcg, thanks!  What I could do is use one of my fave staples, broccoli and carrot slaw!  I keep a bag or two of the raw, julienned "broccoli slaw", as it is called (though it really is broccoli and carrot) in my fridge.  It is SO versatile!  It is absolutely heavenly in stir-fries, as a pasta substitute, and boiled up with a pot of basmati brown rice.  Cooked up, it would be great for adding moisture to turkey burgers.   :D
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Friday, May 31, 2013, 11:57pm; Reply: 56
I made more Morrocan Spiced Turkey Legs with a garlic-honey glaze tonight. I was supposed to carry them to a picnic in Louisiana tomorrow but that got canceled on the hostess's end, plumbing emergency. They were allready brined. Now I've got 6 turkey legs. The dog can have the one that hit the patio floor.
Posted by: Jane, Monday, June 3, 2013, 6:48pm; Reply: 57
GCG, you always make me laugh.  
Someone said something earlier in the thread about ground buffalo.  I do it on the grill all the time - you just have to cook it faster - 3 to 3 1/2 minutes a side is all it takes.  I preheat the grill and just add a pinch of seasalt and ground garlic and they are awesome.  Usually buy 1 pound and cook all four and keep the leftovers for lunches to take to work.  I eat them on millet rice bread or bhutanese red rice bread toasted with a dash of DL Jardine's salsa and arugala or baby spinach.  Same thing with grassfed beef except that they take a little longer.  
Years ago we used to parboil chicken breasts before doing them on the grill so that they would get done more quickly.  
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