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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Compliant Irish Soda Bread?
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Wednesday, March 13, 2013, 7:25pm
Does anyone have a recipe?  
Posted by: Chloe, Wednesday, March 13, 2013, 7:59pm; Reply: 1
While I don't know your toxins or list of compliant foods, I know this recipe would work for
many people.  And I never made Irish soda bread before so not sure how close to the original
this might be.  Doesn't soda bread contain raisins?

People gave it 5 stars....haven't made it but if you do, let us know.

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/gluten-free-irish-soda-bread/

1 1/2 cups white rice flour
1/2 cup tapioca flour
1/2 cup white sugar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 egg
1 cup buttermilk

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease a 9 inch round cake pan.
Combine the rice flour, tapioca flour, sugar, baking soda, baking powder, and salt in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together egg and buttermilk . Make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour in the wet. Stir just until the dry ingredients are moistened. Pour into the cake pan.

Bake for 65 minutes in the preheated oven, or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack, for 10 minutes before removing from the pan. Wrap bread in plastic wrap or aluminum foil and let stand overnight for the best flavor.


Here's another recipe
http://www.kitchen-apparel.com/2/post/2013/03/the-best-gluten-free-irish-soda-bread.html
Posted by: cajun, Wednesday, March 13, 2013, 11:13pm; Reply: 2
Sometimes it has raisins but what we ate in Ireland usually had currants.
It isn't difficult to make and is tasty right out of the oven...doesn't really keep its freshness for a long time but does freeze well. I have 2 recipes but this is the one my (Irish) DH likes.
1tablespoon of butter
4 cups flour ( I haven't tried brown rice flour yet )
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 to 1 cup buttermilk
heat oven to 425 and grease large baking sheet with the butter
sift flour, soda and salt into a large mixing bowl and gradually beat in buttermilk with a wooden spoon...dough should be smooth but firm..may need additional buttermilk
Transfer dough to a floured board and shape into a flat, round loaf, about 1 1/2 inches thick and 8 inches in diameter
Place on baking sheet..with a sharp knife, cut a deep cross on top
place in oven for 30 min. until top is golden
remove from oven and cool slightly...best eaten soon with butter and jam...Yummo!!!!
My other recipe uses eggs, milk, sugar and raisins....
I don't know how to say it in "Gaeilge" but Happy St. Patrick's Day! (and we have an Irish for beginners book) ::)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, March 13, 2013, 11:24pm; Reply: 3
In place of buttermilk, you could use kefir, or a combination of a compliant milk (such as soy or almond) with about a tablespoon of lemon juice added per cup. A mixture of yogurt and a compliant milk would probably work as well. You want something "creamy" as well as acidic. It's not JUST for the taste- you need an acidic ingredient to react to the baking soda so the bread can rise. It will fall flat otherwise.
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Thursday, March 14, 2013, 12:51am; Reply: 4
Wow, thank you ladies for the recipes and tips  :)   I can have kefir or buttermilk and they are a neutral.  I can't wait to try the recipes. I'm part Irish on my Dad's side. His family originated in Ireland and migrated to England during the potato famine  :)  Happy St. Paddy's Day all!
Posted by: rosa, Thursday, March 14, 2013, 9:12am; Reply: 5
Beannachtaí na Féile Pádraig oraibh (sunny)(sunny)

translated...Happy St. Patrick´s Day everyone...or literally ´Blessings of St Patrick´s Day to everyone!´

Cajun´s recipe sounds exactly right! I haven´t actually made soda bread for years since I realised how addictive bread can be for me( we were reared on it!!!) ...but it is sooo delicious just out of the oven slathered in butter.. :P The version with raisins or currants is called "spotted dick"...no idea why!!! or "curannty bread"!!!

There´s also a version with added treacle ( like molasses) which gives a really lovely flavour...it was my Dad´s favourite! My Mum was the best brown soda bread maker in the world...she didn´t have a recipe,just a handful of this and a splosh of that... which is such a shame as I would love to have had all her recipes...

I don´t know how a gluten-free version would turn out, but I used spelt, a mixture of brown and white, or sometimes just white...it tasted very authentic! My children particularly loved the white soda bread...Now I just make yeasted spelt bread for DH and DD....Perhaps for Paddy´s Day I might just make it again for a real treat! :P :P
Posted by: Lin, Thursday, March 14, 2013, 4:33pm; Reply: 6
Cajun, what do you use for flour?
thanks Lin
Posted by: san j, Thursday, March 14, 2013, 7:45pm; Reply: 7
I have never baked this bread myself. Do you serve it with a traditional Irish meal?

What do y'all eat with it on St. Patrick's Day?
Posted by: cajun, Thursday, March 14, 2013, 9:53pm; Reply: 8
Rosa,
Oh how I sooooo love the brown soda bread in your lovely country!!!!!! I even love it plain ! But your country's butter is so divine that I do indulge! ;D
I would love to be able to make that! My DH and I will surely enjoy when we visit Ireland in 2014!! ;) yay! :D

Lin,
I have always made it with unbleached wheat flour..but now...with spelt. It is ok but not as yummy as the original, :-/ in my opinion. I am going to try brown rice flour for this weekend..St. Patricks Day.
My DH loves corned beef brisket and I usually make it with potatoes for him on this one Irish holiday each year. When we were on our first trip to Ireland he asked our hostess in a B&B about corned beef and she said that was "American" ...they make regular brisket or ham there.(Newmarket-on-Fergus)

Rosa, how do you celebrate?
Our last trip there was in 2009 and we spent St. Patrick's Day at the parade in Galway...only to find out the good one was in Dublin! It was a record 70+ degree temp and the locals were soaking up the sun down by the river! My DH was disappointed that the parade was "multi-cultural" as he was so looking forward to
authentic Irish pipers/bands/dancers, etc. There was only one small group of school kids at the beginning with a young man dressed as St. Patrick. Thats it! :-/
Then the locals told us New york is the place to be on this day as the celebration is all about the Irish bringing their culture with them when they emmigrated.
Posted by: cajun, Thursday, March 14, 2013, 10:10pm; Reply: 9
Mayflowers,
I have 2 Irish family lines(Blackburn and Moore) on my Dad's side and one Scottish (Lord Lackey/12th century) on my Mom's.(But both parents are mostly French)

My DH is 1/2 Irish.(All of his Mom's side) His family came to America during the great famine.  :-/(That Cromwell was a nasty guy) :P
They settled in Iowa and farmed.
Posted by: san j, Thursday, March 14, 2013, 10:14pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from cajun
My DH loves corned beef brisket and I usually make it with potatoes for him on this one Irish holiday each year. When we were on our first trip to Ireland he asked our hostess in a B&B about corned beef and she said that was "American" ...they make regular brisket or ham there.(Newmarket-on-Fergus)

...
Then the locals told us New york is the place to be on this day as the celebration is all about the Irish bringing their culture with them when they emmigrated.

http://www.foodnetwork.com/holidays-and-parties/favorite-st-patricks-day-recipes/pictures/index.html

This site has interesting corned beef/cabbage recipes, including a link to an assortment of soda bread recipes.
I also recently watched Ann Burrell make an Irish lamb stew with turnips on her program.

As for the NY St. Paddy's Day parade...Batten down them hatches, because - in the old days, anyway - this was a day of ... bigtime misbehavior on the Manhattan streets, and we used to just stay inside... :-/

Posted by: cajun, Thursday, March 14, 2013, 10:23pm; Reply: 11
Thanks, San j! Good link!
Yes, lamb...we ate delicious lamb meals in Ireland. :)
Posted by: san j, Thursday, March 14, 2013, 10:35pm; Reply: 12
Ann Burrell was saying that the Irish are particularly enamored of turnips.
(I happen to like them, too.)
But -- back to soda bread ---
Posted by: rosa, Friday, March 15, 2013, 8:48am; Reply: 13
Cajun and san j....
I agree soda bread when fresh and home-made is divine! But we don´t eat it with dinner...it´s eaten for breakfast and tea usually...traditionally eaten with " a fry"...but I don´t eat frys!

I´m probably very untypically Irish ... we don´t celebrate Paddy´s Day in any major way. When my children were young and we lived near Dublin we brought them to see the parade which was always fantastic entertainment ( yes, very multi-cultural now!)
Now I live in the south-east, children grown/some left home...so I´ll be watching the Dublin parade on T.V. and just having a relaxing day.
Unfortunately too, celebrations like these can bring out the worst attributes of the Irish...yep, a case of "battening the hatches" in some places here too! Shame, as it ruins the day for others. ::)

Turnips?? ugh! cannot be in the same room as a turnip :X
Posted by: cajun, Friday, March 15, 2013, 6:45pm; Reply: 14
Rosa,
;D No likey turnips, huh?  :P  
I remember driving between Cork and Dublin back in 2005. We saw Waterford, Kilkenny, The National Horse stud farm, and the hauntingly beautiful ancient Wicklow mountains and Glendalough cemetery with the tower of Kevin. Absolutely gorgeous country all around!
Our trip in '09 was mostly the west and across the middle.
We did enjoy delicious food nearly everywhere..especially the bread and yummy soups.
Still the best cod I have ever eaten in my life!!! ;)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, March 15, 2013, 10:27pm; Reply: 15
Fascinating that St Patty's day is a bigger deal in NYC than in Ireland- though it does make a lot of sense!

I doubt there's going to be any drunken brawls in Mayor Bloomburg's NYC.  It's probably good, safe fun nowadays, like New Year's Eve in Times Square.
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Friday, March 15, 2013, 11:13pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from san j
I have never baked this bread myself. Do you serve it with a traditional Irish meal?

What do y'all eat with it on St. Patrick's Day?


Traditionally, corned beef and cabbage, but since we not fans of corned beef in my family, I'm making stuffed cabbage..

I so want to visit Ireland and have the local cusine. I hear when you visit people, they give you a bowl of peas?  I like peas :)
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Friday, March 15, 2013, 11:15pm; Reply: 17
Quoted from cajun
Mayflowers,
I have 2 Irish family lines(Blackburn and Moore) on my Dad's side and one Scottish (Lord Lackey/12th century) on my Mom's.(But both parents are mostly French) .


Cool. I aslo have Scottish and English blood... maybe more English blood by now.  :)
Posted by: rosa, Sunday, March 17, 2013, 3:53pm; Reply: 18
Definitely " no likey turnips"  :X I´ve never ever bought a turnip!!!
Yep...seems like Paddy´s Day is more celebrated in New York than here...there are probably more Irish there  ;D

Cajun
delighted to hear you had such wonderful holidays here...Glendalough is one of my all-time favourite places...I don´t visit there very often anymore since I moved further south. You must come and visit us here in the south-east next time!

Mayflowers
I don´t know of the tradition of giving a bowl of peas to visitors :o  The local cuisine is not terribly interesting to my palate...cabbage and corned beef  :X  not very appropriate for O´s... I do like fish though...
Posted by: grey rabbit, Monday, March 18, 2013, 12:00am; Reply: 19
Quoted from cajun


My DH is 1/2 Irish.(All of his Mom's side) His family came to America during the great famine.  :-/(That Cromwell was a nasty guy) :P
They settled in Iowa and farmed.


My mother's family was from Ireland and settled in Iowa and farmed, some of them are still there farming, including my cousin, Shannon Thomas Bryan ( all three of his names are family surnames).
Posted by: rosa, Monday, March 18, 2013, 1:09pm; Reply: 20
as I said, there are more Irish in New York and the rest of the U.S. than here! is it something like 40 million Americans have Irish ancestry??? evidently we are good ´breeders´ ;D
Posted by: san j, Monday, March 18, 2013, 9:38pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from rosa
as I said, there are more Irish in New York and the rest of the U.S. than here! is it something like 40 million Americans have Irish ancestry??? evidently we are good ´breeders´ ;D

Or you were before the Potato Famine that sent y'all here.  ;)

Posted by: cajun, Tuesday, March 19, 2013, 12:15am; Reply: 22
GR,
My DH still has family in Iowa but I believe only some second cousins are still farming. My DH was born in Sac city but raised in Michigan until coming to California at age 10. His Mother's surname was McClure (and they did multiply like....tribes!!!)
Her other family surnames were Hollister and Bridget. We found McClures in county Armaugh when we were in Ireland. :)

Well, the brown rice flour was ok for the soda bread...but still not what I like. :-/
So, at least our Irish coffees came out delicious1 I used Irish Mist instead of Irish whisky. It is like a whisky liquer made from traditional mead. We had some at Bunratty Castle and Folkpark in Ireland.

Rosa,
We, actually my DH, really enjoyed the dessert, banoffee, when we were there. I have made it several times...it is too sweet for me...but he loves it!
And, yes, we plan to drive all over Ireland in 2014!!!! :D
We watched a funny singing group, Gaelic storm, on TV last evening..my DH was getting melancholy about Ireland.  ;D I am usually the dramatic, sappy one but he was really in a "yearning for Ireland" mood!!
I think it was partly because we do not live in an area with any sort of Irish or Scottish or English pub and he wanted to have dinner and a Guiness and listen to Irish music. We could have driven 70 miles and found several "Irish/type" pubs but then we couldn't have a drink and drive, so....I just told him, "Next year in Ireland".. ;)
Posted by: Lin, Tuesday, March 19, 2013, 12:41am; Reply: 23
Hi Cajun,
I avoid gluten so wheat/spelt are out for me.  I've been reading that using almond flour with some other flours can be good, might have to try and experiment.
thanks, Lin
Posted by: cajun, Tuesday, March 19, 2013, 1:40am; Reply: 24
Lin,
Oh..I forgot about almond flour. I am so used to just using spelt or brown rice flour for everything!!! I use almond meal for cookies but suppose almond flour will work better for bread. ;)
Posted by: Possum, Tuesday, March 19, 2013, 2:02am; Reply: 25
Lin I find white rice mixed with almond flour works really well... I can make a nice cake that holds together well, with that combination, so it should make nice bread too ;)
Posted by: rosa, Tuesday, March 19, 2013, 12:00pm; Reply: 26
I usually make cakes with either rice flour or almond meal...never thought of using that combination for bread! Will definitely try it :P Usually I make bread from spelt for DH and DD.

Cajun
I don´t unfortunately have any of those surnames in my family...my ancestors are from the west and eastern counties.
Hope your DH has recovered from his longing for Ireland over the past few days...I can promise we have some of the most gorgeous little thatched pubs in this area with great guinness when you visit next year  ;D

Both my daughters make the most amazing banoffi! Because it´s soooo sweet and sinful I only indulge very rarely  :-/  
I wonder if that gaelic storm group is the same one that my DH´s niece toured the U.S. with last year????!!!
Posted by: Lin, Tuesday, March 19, 2013, 12:46pm; Reply: 27
Cajun,
Not sure how it will taste, but will give it a try.  
Ironically I have a lot of Irish genes but have never made soda bread!
Time to give it a try.
thanks,
Lin
Posted by: Lin, Tuesday, March 19, 2013, 12:47pm; Reply: 28
Possum ,
Thanks for tip on cake made with almond flour  and white rice, sounds good.
Lin
Posted by: Lin, Tuesday, March 19, 2013, 12:52pm; Reply: 29
Rosa,
My father side is Joyce (Galway i think), Mother side McCann and Mooney from Louth area.
I've been to parts of Ireland but one of these days hope to see some of the West.
I enjoyed my visit over there inspite of the fine rain that came down most of the time. No wonder everyone has such beautiful skin in Ireland.
Lin
Posted by: rosa, Tuesday, March 19, 2013, 3:50pm; Reply: 30
Lin
Joyce is a very common Galway name, no doubt you will find lots of relatives there! Don´t know about the rain and beautiful skin though ... I wouldn´t have thought we Irish have particularly good skin...but if you insist ;D

The West is beautiful, especially if you´re lucky to get good weather, definitely worth a visit!
I´m beginning to think that the Tourist Board should be paying me at this stage ;D ;D

The south-east is lovely too...but in a very different way to the west coast
Posted by: Lin, Tuesday, March 19, 2013, 3:58pm; Reply: 31
Rosa, Yes I gather there is a Joyce County in Galway.  Yep perhaps you could make a little money as a Representative for Ireland tourism :)
Lin
Posted by: Lin, Tuesday, March 19, 2013, 9:42pm; Reply: 32
Cajun,
I used your recipe this afternoon, using almond flour and white rice flour and it came out very nice.
While hot I sampled it with a little apricot jam, and it is yummy!
Thank you!
Lin
Posted by: Possum, Wednesday, March 20, 2013, 4:34am; Reply: 33
Quoted from Lin
Possum, Thanks for tip on cake made with almond flour  and white rice, sounds good.Lin
You're welcome Lin!!
Quoted from Lin
Cajun,I used your recipe this afternoon, using almond flour and white rice flour and it came out very nice.
While hot I sampled it with a little apricot jam, and it is yummy!
Thank you!Lin
Glad it turned out well... ;)

Posted by: cajun, Friday, March 22, 2013, 3:48am; Reply: 34
Lin,
So glad it came out!!! MMMM...hot with butter(or ghee)and jam! ;)

Rosa,
Oh to be sure we will travel most of the country when we come!!!! ;D
Posted by: cajun, Friday, March 22, 2013, 3:53am; Reply: 35
Rosa,
Is your DH's niece a very pretty fiddle player with long dark hair?
This girl was on stage with the guitarist, lead singer and drummer.
They were comical and musical. A bit more relaxed/casual than Celtic Thunder and Celtic woman. I actually enjoy all of these groups! :)
Posted by: rosa, Saturday, March 23, 2013, 1:17pm; Reply: 36
Cajun,
nope..she has long red hair (sometimes! ;D) now I´m thinking she was with "celtic woman" ...she sings beautifully and plays piano...There are soooo many singing and dancing Irish groups touring around the world  it´s difficult to keep track ;D  
Posted by: cajun, Sunday, March 24, 2013, 4:40am; Reply: 37
Rosa,
How wonderful! I admire people with musical/singing/dancing talent! Such fun! :)

One of the things my DH recalls while traveling your lovely country is that in each pub, the singing, pipe/drum/guitar/fiddle playing, and sometimes Irish dancing/even story telling ;D made us feel so happy!
One particular night in Kilarney, as the evening wore on, the original band kept letting newcomers sit and "jam" with them. Then young and old would join in singing/dancing/partying together. It was a joy to experience! :D we didn't want it to end! :)  
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