Print Topic - Archive

BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Need Help with a Cracker Recipe
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, March 13, 2013, 6:37pm
I found a cracker recipe- I think it was posted on one of the BTD facebook groups.  Here's the link: http://ybertaud9.wordpress.com/2013/01/25/diy-gluten-free-vegan-crackers/

I tried it last Friday, with a few substitutions. I added some spices, omitted the sesame seeds and the tamari, and added salt and molasses as a sub for the tamari. They came out delicious!

I'm definitely planning on making it again. I'd also like to be able to make it for Passover- when we don't use rice or flax. I'm sure the flax helps hold it together, so I was thinking of using eggs in its place. It's easy enough to double the quinoa instead of using half rice and half quinoa, but I'm not sure how many eggs to compensate for the flax.

Can anybody help me with the substitutions?
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, March 13, 2013, 8:02pm; Reply: 1
check out the egg subst recipes in recipe center
Posted by: Adopted4, Thursday, March 14, 2013, 12:18am; Reply: 2
That recipe definitely looks delicious, plus it has variations. I'm always hung up on what crackers to buy as our family really misses having crackers and cheese or tunafish. There are normally too many noncompliants or sometimes gluten free products are just too expensive. We eat lots of rice cakes to substitute for bread (which is another hang-up), so it would be nice to have something tasty, compliant, and inexpensive. The only thing I'm uncertain of is how much work it is and whether it's worth the effort. With a family our size we have to bake things in large quantities. I'll be giving the recipe a try in the near future.
Posted by: san j, Thursday, March 14, 2013, 12:32am; Reply: 3
Or you can forget the flour altogether and do something like this:
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/parmesan-crisps-recipe/index.html
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, March 15, 2013, 5:44pm; Reply: 4
I can't have parmesan cheese, (well, it's a black dot) and anyway, kosher parmesan cheese is ridiculously expensive. I buy it occasionally for use as a condiment,  but it's way too expensive to use in baking like this.

It looks like the flax/water mixture in this recipe is much dryer than the typical flax/water ratio for an egg substitute. That's probably because this recipe uses cooked whole grains, not dry flour. I'm not sure I could make these with eggs instead of flax, not unless I added a flour or starch to them. I may or may not play around with this during Passover, but it's probably too much work to be worth it.
Posted by: Chloe, Friday, March 15, 2013, 7:11pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from ruthiegirl
I can't have parmesan cheese, (well, it's a black dot) and anyway, kosher parmesan cheese is ridiculously expensive. I buy it occasionally for use as a condiment,  but it's way too expensive to use in baking like this.

It looks like the flax/water mixture in this recipe is much dryer than the typical flax/water ratio for an egg substitute. That's probably because this recipe uses cooked whole grains, not dry flour. I'm not sure I could make these with eggs instead of flax, not unless I added a flour or starch to them. I may or may not play around with this during Passover, but it's probably too much work to be worth it.


Ruthie....What makes kosher parmesan different from non kosher?  

Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, March 15, 2013, 8:41pm; Reply: 6
Kosher cheeses need rabinical supervision, just like any processed food (ie, not raw produce or dry beans or grains.) That process can be labor-intensive. Cheese has traditionally been made with animal rennet,  so it's a mixture of meat and milk and non-kosher. Many cheeses today are made with microbial rennet- so theoretically OK, but still needs the supervision.

I also suspect that part of the price differential is purely economic- they can charge more and still sell their products, so they do. It's a very frustrating part of keeping kosher.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Thursday, April 18, 2013, 9:20pm; Reply: 7
OK, I made a batch of these today with my new food processor.

It seemed like an awful lot of work for the amount of crackers I ended up with. WAY too much time spent spreading out the dough relatively evenly, then baking, then taking them out, letting them cool, separating them along the score lines I'd made  before baking, noticing that some were still "bendy" so I finished separating them then put the underbaked ones back in for a while...

Does anybody have any "easy cracker making tips" to share with me?
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, April 18, 2013, 9:44pm; Reply: 8
Ruthie, you can't use chia?
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Thursday, April 18, 2013, 11:06pm; Reply: 9
I can use chia- but I'm not sure I *need to* since it works so well with the flax. Passover is over and I'm not worried about making a flax-free recipe right now; I can always play around with it next year if I feel like it.

Right now I'm looking for some practical tips to make the process of "turning cracker dough into crackers" easier, or I may just abandon this project.
Posted by: Chloe, Thursday, April 18, 2013, 11:58pm; Reply: 10
I spread out the cracker dough out with my hands.....I don't roll it out....and I use a pan that seems to be just the right size to hold all the dough... You are trying to move too much dough around and
that's what I think you're having an issue with...I think the trick is to make sure the pan fits the amount of dough and the smaller the better....even if you have to make two batches in two separate pans.  I used an 8 x 8 brownie pan....actually two of them.....If you don't have two square pans, even a round cake pan works because cutting the crackers can be random sized pieces anyway...
I've cut long strips when I used a round pan and then just made a long cracker instead of a square one.   Try cutting parchment paper to fit the pan so you don't have to grease it.  The dough seems to spread easily when it's being pushed and flattened on top of the parchment paper.

Good luck  :)
Posted by: Adam, Friday, April 19, 2013, 12:43pm; Reply: 11
It just takes practice, ruthie.  A lot of the time the dough will be thicker in the middle as you roll it out, and thinner at the edges.  The big problem that always gets me is letting them bake too long, and then I open the oven and a bunch of smoke comes billowing out.  Whole process from start to finish now takes me roughly an hour and I have enough crackers for an entire week.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, April 19, 2013, 2:32pm; Reply: 12
I'm using large foil pans- approximately one foot by two feet, and I'm making 2 of them at once. Making a batch smaller than that seems like a waste of time. I don't have proper cookie sheets. I refuse to buy the kind with a toxic "non stick coating" and I haven't seen the kind without that in about 20 years! The "full size steam table pans" at Costco are far cheaper than buying "aluminum foil cookie sheets" at the supermarket, though I suppose I could buy 2 of those just for cracker making if I really had to.

I have lined the pans with parchment paper, and even used another piece of parchment paper on top to smooth the dough out in between. I couldn't use a real rolling pin because it's wider than the pan and the pan is too deep to roll it anyway. Would I do better rolling it out on the table (on the paper) and then moving the parchment paper to the pans after rolling, before baking?

I also wonder if I'd do better with a less sticky recipe.
Posted by: Spring, Friday, April 19, 2013, 2:39pm; Reply: 13
Ruthie, I wouldn't worry about whatever the pans are coated with if you are going to use parchment. I don't see why you couldn't roll out a one square foot at a time to place in the pans you have. Can you use just a little less liquid instead of not using a good recipe?
Posted by: Chloe, Friday, April 19, 2013, 2:41pm; Reply: 14
Oil or dampen your hands if the dough is too sticky.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Sunday, April 21, 2013, 10:46pm; Reply: 15
There's no added liquid in the recipe, so I don't see how I could make it drier.
Posted by: Possum, Sunday, April 21, 2013, 11:13pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from ruthiegirl
There's no added liquid in the recipe, so I don't see how I could make it drier.
Try a little less oil perhaps? Did you see this recipe? http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/gluten-free-crackers-wheat-thins/
Posted by: Spring, Monday, April 22, 2013, 1:37am; Reply: 17
Quoted from ruthiegirl
There's no added liquid in the recipe, so I don't see how I could make it drier.


1. Place flax seeds in a bowl and cover with ½ cup water. Let soak for at least 20 minutes. At this time you can prepare everything else.
Posted by: Enobattar, Monday, April 22, 2013, 12:58pm; Reply: 18
Quoted from Adopted4
The only thing I'm uncertain of is how much work it is and whether it's worth the effort. With a family our size we have to bake things in large quantities. I'll be giving the recipe a try in the near future.



If you have a Texas sheet cake pan, simply grease it with compliant choise.  Measure 1/4 c. per family member of compliant flour into a bowl.  To this mix in 1/2 t. or salt per 1 c. of flour.  Add a splash of compliant oil and/or flaxseed meal, or sesame seeds if you like but it is not necessary.  Add water a little at a time until the whole just comes together (damp but not wet).

Put ball of dough into middle of greased pan and begin to pat it out as thinly as possible toward the edges dipping your fingers into oil as needed to prevent dough sticking to your fingers.  (If you have a large family this sounds like a great job for your kids who may even think it's fun!)

Sprinkle additional salt on top before baking.  I make a single serving (1/4 c.) on a pizza pan and bake it for 7-10 min. on 350 degees.  For multiple servings I think I would reduce the oven temperature to allow the middle of your cracker to 'crisp up' and match the edges.  Break up and serve.

It takes a little experimenting but I once you do it a time or two you just may come to love the fact that you can have a fresh, crisp, good for you cracker with minimal effort.  Also, there is a lot of room, as you can see, with experimenting and variations.  Have fun.  :)

Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, April 23, 2013, 9:10pm; Reply: 19
I'm not sure I can find gluten-free flours available for any cheaper than I can buy  Mary's Gone Crackers at Costco. I like the fact that the recipe I found uses cooked whole grains.

I think I'll play around with the water in flax seeds part, and maybe even cook the grains a little drier than usual. I also may need to invest in a couple of actual cookie sheets so I can roll out the dough properly.

Cooking WITH my kids is a nice idea, but in reality I get a lot more work done while they're in school.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Wednesday, April 24, 2013, 1:21am; Reply: 20
These bean chips have avoids, but I have been wondering if i could make my own with refried beans somehow.

http://beanitos.com/beanitos_products.pdf
Posted by: ABJoe, Wednesday, April 24, 2013, 1:46am; Reply: 21
Quoted from C_Sharp
These bean chips have avoids, but I have been wondering if i could make my own with refried beans somehow.

http://beanitos.com/beanitos_products.pdf

I don't see why not...  Do you make your own refried beans or do you buy them pre-made?

It seems like precooking beans and rice, blending them with the ground flax seeds and adding a bit of oil, spices and salt, rolling / patting them out and baking.  Getting the proportions for consistency and flavor correct are going to take a bit of work, but shouldn't be too hard.
Posted by: Chloe, Wednesday, April 24, 2013, 3:31pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from C_Sharp
These bean chips have avoids, but I have been wondering if i could make my own with refried beans somehow.

http://beanitos.com/beanitos_products.pdf


Notice that the pinto bean recipe which contains flax seeds has the same fiber content as the
black bean recipe that doesn't contain flax.

I find black beans are drier than pinto beans when cooked.  Make sure you don't cook them into a mush. The photo shows bits of visible bean fiber so I think I would try mashing beans with a fork or putting them through a potato ricer. Maybe the rice/flax has to go into the food processor.

I would think you'd have to play with the ingredient's proportions and get a feel for the dough's texture.  Ingredients are listed in order of their dominance in the recipe.  So this would call for
more beans than rice.

The organic refried beans I buy in a can seems like the beans are too pulverized for this recipe.
I don't see any bean skin fiber.  In the chips, they're visible.
Print page generated: Friday, August 22, 2014, 9:38pm