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BTD Forums  /  Journal Club and Literature Review  /  Mislabeled fish common
Posted by: Lloyd, Friday, March 1, 2013, 8:20pm
http://oceana.org/sites/default/files/reports/National_Seafood_Fraud_Testing_Results_FINAL.pdf

Quoted Text
....Seafood substitutions included species carrying health advisories (e.g. king mackerel sold as grouper; escolar sold as white tuna), cheaper farmed fish sold as wild (e.g. tilapia sold as red snapper),....
Posted by: Lola, Friday, March 1, 2013, 8:48pm; Reply: 1
it s an ocean out there!!! :-/
Posted by: Averno, Friday, March 1, 2013, 8:56pm; Reply: 2
Quoted from Lola
it s an ocean out there!!! :-/


(clap)(clap)(clap)


Posted by: 815 (Guest), Sunday, March 3, 2013, 1:29pm; Reply: 3
That was on a recent Dr. Oz show about stores and restaurants ripping people off by saying they're getting salmon or another expensive fish but are served escolar which is toxic and causes D!
I knew there's a reason why I don't like fish!  >:( :X

http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/bait-plate-avoid-fishy-business-seafood-fraud
Posted by: Squirrel, Monday, March 4, 2013, 2:11pm; Reply: 4
Oh goodness. I wonder whether there have been any studies in the UK too? I'll have a Google next.

I have more of a vested interest in this than just loving sushi. I'm also anaphylactically (is that a word?) allergic to certain fish such as cod, sole, plaice, haddock. After having reactions as a small child, I steered obsessively clear of anything fish-related until I was 28, when I got drunk and requested a prawn in a pub. Just one, please. (Yes they laughed at me.) And I was fine. I started testing other fish, and a whole new world opened up to me, and I became a lot healthier.

But since I began the BTD in 2007 while living in Singapore, I have known that fish labelling is the most arbitrary by far of all foods. Have a look at FishBase.org and you'll be amazed how umpteen different species, yes, species of fish are all called cod, or snapper, or whatever in different parts of the world. I can eat "cod" in the far east but not in the UK. I've had reactions to "river fish" in Cambodia, and "hake" in Australia.

If the fisherman calls his fish "cod", always has done, and sells it as such, it may not be mislabelled as such, just a mistake in translation. That's not deliberate fraud. And it's much harder to control. If the classifications aren't even in place, how can they be policed?
Posted by: yaeli, Monday, March 4, 2013, 3:50pm; Reply: 5
I'll have another hard talk with my fish monger next time I'm in the market place. The source of this irresponsibility is with the authorities i.e. the ministry of health + the ministry of commerce. grrrrrr!!!!!  >:( >:(
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, March 4, 2013, 5:17pm; Reply: 6
Is this common in canned fish, or only fish that's sold "fresh"?
Posted by: Lloyd, Monday, March 4, 2013, 5:30pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from ruthiegirl
Is this common in canned fish, or only fish that's sold "fresh"?


It mentions both.
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