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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Is that spelt
Posted by: Hanan, Saturday, February 23, 2013, 3:31pm
Hi everybody,I live in Saudi Arabia we do not know what is spelt .
But we have wheat that grows on the wild without human interference,
Is that spelt ??
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Saturday, February 23, 2013, 3:43pm; Reply: 1
I think it s very likely Emmer or einkorn.
Welcome by the way  :)
Posted by: Hanan, Saturday, February 23, 2013, 4:38pm; Reply: 2
Thanks for your nice welcome Henriette, but I do not know what is emmer also!!  ??)
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Saturday, February 23, 2013, 4:44pm; Reply: 3
Very ancient wheat.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emmer

  :)
Posted by: Hanan, Saturday, February 23, 2013, 7:39pm; Reply: 4
Is this emmer ok with our blood type ??
Posted by: Lola, Sunday, February 24, 2013, 7:34am; Reply: 5
Emmer Wheat ("Farro")

try a search, build an opinion
http://www.bing.com/search?cp=1252&q=emmer&q1=site%3adadamo.com&first=41&FORM=PERE3
Posted by: RedLilac, Sunday, February 24, 2013, 3:44pm; Reply: 6
Emmer wheat is an avoid.  Spelt is also known as dinkel wheat,[2] or hulled wheat.  Do you have Essene (Manna) Bread around or sprouted wheat?  Check your Health Food Stores.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Sunday, February 24, 2013, 10:48pm; Reply: 7
Wild wheat can be a variety of different things. Here are some samples for around the Middle East.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/croptrust/4534604598/lightbox/

Quoted Text
Wild emmer (T. dicoccoides and T. araraticum) resulted from the hybridisation of a wild wheat, T. urartu, and an as yet unidentified goatgrass, probably similar to Ae. speltoides. Hexaploid wheats (e.g. T. aestivum and T. spelta) are the result of a hybridisation between a domesticated tetraploid wheat, probably T. dicoccum or T. durum, and another goatgrass, Ae. tauschii (also known as Ae. squarrosa).
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, February 25, 2013, 11:40pm; Reply: 8
Any of the wild wheats are probably healthier choices than modern wheat, but I'm not sure that all have been specifically studied.
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