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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Chicken Stock for BT B & AB
Posted by: 30070 (Guest), Thursday, February 21, 2013, 3:41am
Dear all

I understand that Chicken is on the avoid list for B's & AB's.
Eggs are good as there is no flesh.
Any comments on the use of chick stock that has been made with bones only?

Cheers Marie

Posted by: ABJoe, Thursday, February 21, 2013, 4:08am; Reply: 1
Quoted from 30070
I understand that Chicken is on the avoid list for B's & AB's.
Eggs are good as there is no flesh.
Any comments on the use of chick stock that has been made with bones only?

I would stay away from it.  It is easier for me to just totally avoid any possible contact with chicken broth, as it is too easy to not get all of the meat off of the bones or have the bone marrow cause some issue, etc.  I'm not saying there would be enough lectin to cause a problem, just that I have enough healing to do without taking that chance...
Posted by: Amazone I., Thursday, February 21, 2013, 7:30am; Reply: 2
all products containing any chicken related issues I'm going to avoid ;) ;D....
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Thursday, February 21, 2013, 2:12pm; Reply: 3
If you're making your own, use turkey bones to make stock instead. The flavor isn't exactly the same, but turkey works in any chicken recipe and turkey broth works in every chicken broth recipe.

If you're buying ready-made stock, beef is a safer choice. Beef is neutral for Bs. It's an avoid for As and ABs, but not because of lectins- it's because As and ABs don't have the right enzymes to digest the beef protein. To the best of my understanding, the beef broth itself is perfectly fine. Meanwhile chicken contains lectins that are harmful to Bs and ABs, and  this lectin is present in the broth as well.
Posted by: Victoria, Thursday, February 21, 2013, 5:47pm; Reply: 4
I avoid chicken broth also.  It seems like Dr. D has made a statement about avoiding broths made from chicken bones as being avoids, but sorry, I can't locate it.  I just don't want to risk stroke, which is strongly linked to the B type and consumption of chicken lectin.
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