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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Cookie Question
Posted by: BluesSinger, Tuesday, February 12, 2013, 8:26pm
Hey Does anyone know if I could make these cookies and use a heart shape form to cut them with and then bake?  

http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipedepictor7x.cgi?1123
Posted by: Dianne, Tuesday, February 12, 2013, 9:00pm; Reply: 1
Yes, because the oat flour will 'hold' it all together. Sounds yummy!  :)
Posted by: Chloe, Tuesday, February 12, 2013, 9:08pm; Reply: 2
Quoted from BluesSinger
Hey Does anyone know if I could make these cookies and use a heart shape form to cut them with and then bake?  

http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/recipedepictor7x.cgi?1123


If I were you I'd try baking one heart shaped cookie before cutting out all the heart shapes.  Here's what I've experienced trying to take cookie recipes that were meant for ball or drop cookies and thought I could have good results when I rolled out the dough and used a
cookie cutter instead. Many times as the cookies start to bake, even though they started with a shape, the shape is lost as the cookie spreads out in the oven..My experience has been with using chocolate chip cookie dough and pressing out shapes...I lost the shape. The fact that this recipe has oats there's a chance this could hold the heart shape but if you're going to try this recipe anyway, I'd honestly try baking one heart shaped cookie so you know for sure what your final product will look like.

If this recipe had indicated to place the cookies 2" apart on the cookie sheet, it would have
implied that the cookies flatten and spread while baking...(therefore losing original shape)
but the fact that this recipe has left out that info....I can only say "try one.  Sorry, that's the
best advice I can give you.

Posted by: Chloe, Tuesday, February 12, 2013, 9:11pm; Reply: 3
Quoted from Dianne
Yes, because the oat flour will 'hold' it all together. Sounds yummy!  :)


You think?  It's got a cup of butter....it will melt....likely taking the whole cookie down with it
in the oven...And it doesn't call for oat flour but flour...Has oats,  Even my oatmeal cookies will
spread when baking.  Still, not sure about this working.  But would love to know if it does.

Posted by: Dianne, Tuesday, February 12, 2013, 9:47pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from Chloe


You think?  It's got a cup of butter....it will melt....likely taking the whole cookie down with it
in the oven...And it doesn't call for oat flour but flour...Has oats,  Even my oatmeal cookies will
spread when baking.  Still, not sure about this working.  But would love to know if it does.



Yikes! Thanks Chloe!  ??)  I didn't even register the amount of fat, this will not work, unless, like I've done with the Pizzelle recipe that I posted - use some pureed fruit, figs, dates, prunes to replace half of the fat. With that amount of fat, I would probably play around with that 1/2 & 1/2 ratio in favour of a bit more pureed fruit.

Posted by: Chloe, Tuesday, February 12, 2013, 10:03pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from Dianne


Yikes! Thanks Chloe!  ??)  I didn't even register the amount of fat, this will not work, unless, like I've done with the Pizzelle recipe that I posted - use some pureed fruit, figs, dates, prunes to replace half of the fat. With that amount of fat, I would probably play around with that 1/2 & 1/2 ratio in favour of a bit more pureed fruit.



Dough that is designed to be rolled out very thin and used with a cookie press isn't the
same types of dough that you'd use to make an oatmeal cookie.  The roll-out doughs won't rise much... generally won't shift in shape during baking and the cookies are not chewy.  Not sure if
pureed fruit is going to work. In order for a pressed cookie to keep its shape, the ratio of
wet to dry ingredients produce a hard crunch to the finished product... Fruit is chewy. That's my main reason for thinking this dough won't covert properly.

This is a typical rolled cookie dough

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/the-best-rolled-sugar-cookies/

Notice that a rolled out cookie dough contains a lot of eggs

In the typebase recipe, egg whites are optional.  Another reason why it's not going to convert well.

Heart shaped cookies from scratch (probably difficult to make compliant)
http://lanilovesbaking.blogspot.com/2012/09/heart-shape-sugar-cookies-from-scratch.html

I've tried this trick before but when cookies baked I lost my heart shape
http://astepinthejourney.com/2013/02/heart-shaped-cookies/
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, February 12, 2013, 10:44pm; Reply: 6
Having a heart shaped muffin tin would force these cookies to "shape up!" I make cookies in muffin tins often.
Posted by: prunella, Wednesday, February 13, 2013, 1:37am; Reply: 7
Can you eat almond flour? grapeseed or olive oil? a bit of agave?  If you can eat butter, go ahead, but I use oil with good results.
http://www.elanaspantry.com/pecan-shortbread-cookies/

I use a recipe from the Almond Flour cookbook--I think it's on the blog Elana's Pantry. There are several cookie recipes that are very similar.  I love the ones with chips made from chopping up 85% dark chocolate. Sometimes I add pecans or macademia nuts.
Also, I love the ones with pecans and fresh rosemary.

I mix up the dough, then roll it into a log, which I freeze until solid. You may be able to freeze for 1-2 hours.
Essentially, these become slice and bake cookies. While the log is still quite hard, but thawed slightly, I slice disks. These do not spread.  A heart shape could be made by cutting a notch and pinching the pointed bottom.

Happy Valentines Day!
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, February 13, 2013, 2:38pm; Reply: 8
I personally think you're better off taking a typical "sugar cookie" recipe and substituting a compliant flour. I would use real sugar for this.

Alternatively, bake round cookies and then "paint" them with a heart-shaped frosting after they've cooled.

Or just bake them round-ish and don't worry about the holiday-themed shape.
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, February 14, 2013, 4:28am; Reply: 9
I don't know why I didn't think of this earlier, but I have very good luck with baking cookies round and cutting them whatever shape I want after they are cooked! Works great! My family loves oatmeal cookies and even with lots of nuts and cranberries and raisins added they make a perfect cut every time. And I don't have a bit of trouble getting rid of what's left after I cut them! These cookies are moderately chewy.
Posted by: Chloe, Thursday, February 14, 2013, 3:20pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from Spring
I don't know why I didn't think of this earlier, but I have very good luck with baking cookies round and cutting them whatever shape I want after they are cooked! Works great! My family loves oatmeal cookies and even with lots of nuts and cranberries and raisins added they make a perfect cut every time. And I don't have a bit of trouble getting rid of what's left after I cut them! These cookies are moderately chewy.


Are you using your cookie cutter when cookies are still warm?  It's a great idea Spring....you're very clever!  :)

Posted by: Spring, Thursday, February 14, 2013, 6:47pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from Chloe
Are you using your cookie cutter when cookies are still warm?  It's a great idea Spring....you're very clever!  :)

Thanks, Chloe! It doesn't seem to matter whether they are warm or cold.  Sometimes there is a thinner rim around the cookie that is VERY crisp, and it breaks up but the cookie itself is always just right! It is fun to have perfect cookies on a plate! One suggestion I would make is to be sure the cutters are nice and sharp. A tea cake type cookie that someone wants to decorate might need to be left slightly soft which is the case with my recipes anyway. But if the cookie is going to be very crisp through and through after cooling, I would cut them before they finish cooling. Like I have said before, my family almost feels deprived that I don't make cookies as much as I used to do, but I have used this method of cutting cookies for years.
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