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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Tip for stretching basil pesto
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Thursday, December 27, 2012, 1:24am
Before I tell youzzz my little tippipoo, let me just say at the outset that I had the not-so-bril idea to use olive oil on my face tonight as a moisturizer--not that that, in itself, isn't a bril idea, because it so IS, but read on--and I got some in my EYES  :o :o :o , so now I'm having a devil of a time trying to SEE and focus (not just focus my eyes but my mind, as there is also BURNING involved with this, as well as tears flowing and goodness knows what all is going on), so if this post isn't up to par, please be understanding!   :K)

Okay, that on the record, I just want to tell youzzz guys that, tonight, I blended myself up a basil pesto, only since basil is very expensive (no, I CAN'T grow my own, as my entire property is very SHADY and, well, just trust me on this), I streeeeeeeetched it out by adding some baby kale to it.  It came out with all the delish flavor of a strong basil pesto, yet using the baby kale meant I only needed a few sprigs of actual basil in there--the rest of the green pesto was the baby kale!  WINNING!

The mixture contained:

Basil (a few sprigs of fresh)
Baby Kale (Probably two cups or so)
Organic Lemon Juice (concentrate--probably about a good two tablespoons--I needed liquid to get the blender going!)
Olive Oil (kind of a LOT, placed in the blender FIRST, so as to get 'er blending...I would say I put at least two tablespoons in at first, and then added a tad on top of everything, in addition to more lemon juice, because the blender was not so much with the cooperating at first *lol*  ;D )
Villagio Marzano Tomatoes (I just happened to have a few of these and decided to throw them in--they are like large grape tomatoes, sort of...I only put about six or seven in there and the mixture still came out looking like a green pesto, but I think they added a certain je ne sais quoi)
Sea Salt (to taste--I LOVE me some sea salt in virtually everything!)
Garlic (granules, powdered or fresh, to taste)

DELISH!  And nutrish!  Vitamin K ALERT!

I often buy basil but rarely made my beloved basil pesto because it took so MUCH basil.  Now that I've discovered this simple stretching method, though, I'm gonna be having pesto ALL the time!  You could use other greens besides baby kale to do the stretching, too.  I also have some arugula, which I might try next time.

I love our diet!  Are we the opposite of deprived or WHAT?  Wu HUUUU!

Oh, what did I have this wonderful pesto ON, you ask?  Why, on some lovely brown basmati rice, purple onion, carrot and ground turkey, of course!  Yeah!  It's so great to be a GTDer!
Posted by: Drea, Thursday, December 27, 2012, 4:51am; Reply: 1
Like!
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Thursday, December 27, 2012, 2:13pm; Reply: 2
Hi PT,  :)
Sorry that you got oil in your eyes. I know that stings and then you can't see for an hour or 2. I've done that more than once.

Thanks for the pesto tip.    A food processor,  would've worked better than a blender maybe?
What about pignolia nuts? Pesto isn't pesto without those expensive little pine nuts. IDK if they are ok for you?  I really like the idea of kale with the basil, basil for some reason gives me a stomach ache.
Posted by: san j, Friday, December 28, 2012, 1:34am; Reply: 3
Quoted from 815
Hi PT,  :)
Sorry that you got oil in your eyes. I know that stings and then you can't see for an hour or 2. I've done that more than once.

Thanks for the pesto tip.    A food processor,  would've worked better than a blender maybe?
What about pignolia nuts? Pesto isn't pesto without those expensive little pine nuts. IDK if they are ok for you?  I really like the idea of kale with the basil, basil for some reason gives me a stomach ache.

Classic pesto contains pignolis and parmesan, too, and these are terrific for extending it into the protein realm as well as the flavor one.
But any beneficial nut and/or cheese would add interest to your pesto. In fact, many chefs deliberately choose walnuts over pignolis, preferring the taste here and there...

Posted by: Possum, Friday, December 28, 2012, 8:52am; Reply: 4
Great tip PT!!!
Posted by: amyflood, Friday, December 28, 2012, 1:41pm; Reply: 5
Thanks PT. I actually usually do grow my own basil but last year i did not. I froze  gallons of pesto in 2010 and 2011 and i am done to my last little baggie and started to wonder what will i do. I have lost pignoli  nuts going from hunter to gatherer, so i'll probably try your recipe with some walnuts (i'd better check that i can have those too!).
Love reading your posts!
Posted by: Jane, Friday, December 28, 2012, 6:48pm; Reply: 6
You can use baby spinach in pesto too.  Sounds like a good recipe though PT.  Happiest to New Years to you and to all.  Glad to see you posting a little more.
Posted by: Dianne, Friday, December 28, 2012, 7:21pm; Reply: 7
You made me laugh so much with the oil in your eyes post; been there, done that. Thanks goodness I did not have to go out. Thanks for the tip, I can't have raw cruciferous veggies as they have goitregens in them that  inhibit thyroid function but will use some other leafy green veggie. :)
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Friday, December 28, 2012, 7:23pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from san j
Classic pesto contains pignolis and parmesan, too, But any beneficial nut and/or cheese would add interest to your pesto. In fact, many chefs deliberately choose walnuts over pignolis, preferring the taste here and there...


I have Parmesean as a black dot. I find walnuts to be bitter as compared to pine nuts.. But to each their own.  
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Sunday, December 30, 2012, 12:49am; Reply: 9
Hi, guys!  Great posts!!!!!!  MF, how the flip are ya, girl?  Everyone where I work has the flu, and I mean the FLU, with a capital "one of 'em went to the doctor and it was confirmed, yet she still came in to work to expose the rest of us--WHAT?", and I'm hitting the Proberry Caps (elderberry) really hard, so I'm pretty sure I won't get the full-fledged model, yet right at this moment, I feel a tad febrile and odd, so good thing I'm planning on making my first cuppa cocoa in YEARS, in a few minutes, which will consist of organic cocoa, agave nectar, and POSSIBLY a dash of cinnamon, but that has yet to be determined.  Anyway, I digress (that's how you know this is really me and not an imposter).  Back to pesto, but I just went into all that so you'd all know that, if I'm more incoherent than usual, this time it ain't oil in my eyes, it is weeeeird febrileness... ;D

So, YES, instead of the pine nuts, as San J said, walnuts would be good and also classic.  I myself tend to use roasted, salted (NEVER raw) pumpkin seeds.  Yum!

Also, an update:  The next night or possibly the night after that from when I made the basil-baby kale pesto, I made one with JUST baby kale and, you know what, IT WAS DELICIOUS!  Now, momma loves her basil, SO MUCH, and there is nothing like an intense basil pesto, but I'm telling ya, I'm realizing you can make a decent green pesto outta pretty much any fresh, dark green veggie you have sitting around the house.

Actually, I threw that baby kale pesto into a soup I made and it ended up very similar to that sorrel soup one can buy.

I do have a little food processor and that might have worked better, you are right, MF, re giving me a little courser texture.  Anyway:  we have such grand ingredients to work with in this diet, how can one screw things up too badly?  One can't!  Yay!   :D ;D

P.S.  Jane, baby spinach sounds good, too!  Oh, also wanted to say:  all those containers of salads one can buy in the grocery store, which are organic and already triple washed (LOVE and LOVE), are not just for cold salads, but you can also use them in soups, pestos as we are discussing here, or simply stir-fried.  They are so flippin' CONVENIENT!!!!!!  I'm all about convenience!  I love anything I don't have to even WASH, let alone chop up.  Let's hear it for 2012 (soon to be 13)!

edited to add:  P.P.S.  Jane, it's good to BE posting more.  I'm finally back to normal, if ya know what I mean...or as close to normal as I come.
Posted by: Averno, Sunday, December 30, 2012, 11:32am; Reply: 10

Can't wait to give this kale pesto a try! I've been supplementing with walnuts for years, maybe exclusively next time. Also, I use lots of roasted garlic (with granules to taste--to raise the "bite") and manchego instead of parma. The fruitiest Spanish EVOOs make a big difference, too.
Posted by: Peppermint Twist, Sunday, December 30, 2012, 2:49pm; Reply: 11
I hope you like it, Averno!
Posted by: honeybee, Thursday, January 3, 2013, 9:58am; Reply: 12
LOve the pesto stretchin' tipz - can be spendy and a luxury with all that sweet baby basil lol; PT you should try the arugula/basil mix too - it has become my standby - absolutely love that stuff - so peppery (convenient for B's!)

Another flexible green is cilantro / corriander - makes terrific punchy pesto - doesn't even need cheese, nutritional yeast will do - more savings, yay!

Always remember to throw in a fresh chopped chili, I do anyway.  ;D
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Thursday, January 3, 2013, 6:42pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from Peppermint Twist
Hi, guys!  Great posts!!!!!!  MF, how the flip are ya, girl? .


Hey PT!!   ;D :D  :K)  Doing ok.. now that the year of (that rhymes with bell) is over  ;D
You are an inspiration!  I'm off wheat/gluten, I have more energy now.  I started my Qi Gong again. (every time I try yoga, I get injured) I'm just about to go for a walk around the campus indoors because it's 28 here outside.  But it's sunny so I might venture out...
Posted by: honeybee, Monday, January 7, 2013, 7:01am; Reply: 14
Am on a pesto frenzy this week, making one tonight and I will mix what I have left of basil, parsley and arugula.. A pesto puttanesca even ;)
Posted by: 815 (Guest), Monday, January 7, 2013, 8:16pm; Reply: 15
I find pesto to be a summer dish. I don't make it in the Fall/Winter. I like stoups in the cold months.. and vegetable stews...
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