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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  quinoa
Posted by: marjorie, Thursday, November 15, 2012, 1:41am
Is quinoa considered a grain? I searched and found that even though it is treated like a grain, in reality, it is not?

how do other O's feel eating quinoa?

Thanks!
Posted by: Adopted4, Thursday, November 15, 2012, 2:16am; Reply: 1
Quinoa is an excellent grain to eat because of its health qualities and its compatibility with all blood types. It's higher in protein than most grains and I think has low allergenic properties. My whole family eats quinoa (3 O's here) and is delicious if prepared and seasoned well. Nobody here has any apparent difficulties eating it.

Even for an O, it is probably very digestible, so I'd give it a try if I were you.
Posted by: marjorie, Thursday, November 15, 2012, 3:11am; Reply: 2
Quoted from Adopted4
Quinoa is an excellent grain to eat because of its health qualities and its compatibility with all blood types. It's higher in protein than most grains and I think has low allergenic properties. My whole family eats quinoa (3 O's here) and is delicious if prepared and seasoned well. Nobody here has any apparent difficulties eating it.

Even for an O, it is probably very digestible, so I'd give it a try if I were you.


Great. Works for me, but I still wonder if it really is a grain?:)
Posted by: Drea, Thursday, November 15, 2012, 3:33am; Reply: 3
Quinoa, a species of goosefoot, is a grain-like crop grown primarily for its edible seeds. It is a pseudocereal rather than a true cereal, or grain, as it is not a member of the true grass family.

Quinoa
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Thursday, November 15, 2012, 4:07am; Reply: 4
You can boil it with vegetable stock or any compliant stock or us it to thicken soups.
Posted by: aussielady582, Thursday, November 15, 2012, 4:54am; Reply: 5
Yes I eat quinoa, maybe 2 or 3 times a week, sometimes mixed with amaranth.  I also have sprouted quinoa in a glass jar, it then becomes a live food with starch converted to easy to digest sugars.  I think it is classified as a herb/ seed.  I think it is okay, as is gluten free and this herb/seed is not stored like wheat and some other grains.  It is high in nutrients and protein.  On the specific carb diet, it is not allowed, this would apply to people who have serious issues with digesting starches, or maybe leaky gut syndrome, some children with autism don't eat quinoa.  See http://www.breakingthevicsiouscycle.info
Qunioa is nice as a breaky cereal too, with some fruit on top, a little ghee or coconut oil (I am still trying to find out why coconut oil is not realy allowed for me).  nice cooked in coconut milk or almond milk, but one needs to check if these milks are allowable for their blood or geno type.  Soak quinoa and rinse well before cooking. Top with a little flax or hemp seed! Take care. Amanda
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Thursday, November 15, 2012, 10:56am; Reply: 6
I rinse my organic Quinoa to within an inch of it's life (you can never rinse it enough IMO) then soak my Quinoa over night again rinsing it thoroughly before then sprouting it for 24 hours rinsing ever 8 - 12 hours then ferment it for 24 hours.

It's wonderful stuff.

I do the same with my rice although the initial soaking is about 24 hours for it.
Posted by: marjorie, Thursday, November 15, 2012, 2:06pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from PCUK-Positive
I rinse my organic Quinoa to within an inch of it's life (you can never rinse it enough IMO) then soak my Quinoa over night again rinsing it thoroughly before then sprouting it for 24 hours rinsing ever 8 - 12 hours then ferment it for 24 hours.

It's wonderful stuff.

I do the same with my rice although the initial soaking is about 24 hours for it.


That is amazing.. good for you. It sounds so complicated though:( I boiled it last night and almost forgot about it.

Kind of like the absentminded professor:) whew.. luckily I go to it before the alarm went off once again!

Posted by: marjorie, Thursday, November 15, 2012, 2:09pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from aussielady582
Yes I eat quinoa, maybe 2 or 3 times a week, sometimes mixed with amaranth.  I also have sprouted quinoa in a glass jar, it then becomes a live food with starch converted to easy to digest sugars.  I think it is classified as a herb/ seed.  I think it is okay, as is gluten free and this herb/seed is not stored like wheat and some other grains.  It is high in nutrients and protein.  On the specific carb diet, it is not allowed, this would apply to people who have serious issues with digesting starches, or maybe leaky gut syndrome, some children with autism don't eat quinoa.  See http://www.breakingthevicsiouscycle.info
Qunioa is nice as a breaky cereal too, with some fruit on top, a little ghee or coconut oil (I am still trying to find out why coconut oil is not realy allowed for me).  nice cooked in coconut milk or almond milk, but one needs to check if these milks are allowable for their blood or geno type.  Soak quinoa and rinse well before cooking. Top with a little flax or hemp seed! Take care. Amanda


Thanks. I think I am better off without it in the long run. I definitely do not "need" it per say. I am celiac if you have not read that in other posts, but my nutritionist keeps telling me to try it for balance. I also think I could have it mayeb once or week for a treat or something.

I know, I hear so much about coc oil and not sure why we cant have it?? so, you are still using it and do not see any effects? just curious.

TY
M
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Thursday, November 15, 2012, 2:39pm; Reply: 9
I don't really care what it is botanically. It cooks up like a grain and counts as a "carbohydrate" in Dr D's serving recommendations. I think of it as a higher protein, lower carb grain; although it's still higher in carbs than protein and I don't consider it the "protein" component of any meal. It's a "healthy grain" as far as I'm concerned.
Posted by: marjorie, Thursday, November 15, 2012, 7:47pm; Reply: 10
Quoted from ruthiegirl
I don't really care what it is botanically. It cooks up like a grain and counts as a "carbohydrate" in Dr D's serving recommendations. I think of it as a higher protein, lower carb grain; although it's still higher in carbs than protein and I don't consider it the "protein" component of any meal. It's a "healthy grain" as far as I'm concerned.


True. Maybe that is why I have always stayed away from it.
TY
Posted by: Lin, Thursday, November 15, 2012, 10:14pm; Reply: 11
I just read an article on Celiac.com site about a study of the different types of quinoa and if it affects celiacs.  They discovered a few strains do affect celiacs, one being red quinoa, the two strains came from Bolivia and Peru.  And separately I read something similar on Oats.  This seems to be unrelated to contamination and new studies with possibly not all the facts yet.
But setting that aside Quinoa is a great substitute for rice.
Posted by: D.L., Thursday, November 15, 2012, 10:32pm; Reply: 12
Marjorie - Quinoa tastes good if it is boiled, rinsed, then sauteed with onions in olive oil. However, I guess I am allergic to it, as it has the same effect on me as gluten cereals/grains.
Lin - I'm glad to know that. Maybe that's been my problem with Quinoa all along. And oats. I can't find any grain I can tolerate yet.
Posted by: aussielady582, Friday, November 16, 2012, 12:14am; Reply: 13
Hello all - interesting to read your comments.  I also get funny reaction after eating oats, tried them again recently and just did not enjoy them for some reason as I used to at one time.  Plus they are acidic once digested.  I still think we can just keep eating lots of veggies, and proteins/fats of course.  Grains are more in recent times (agricultural changes mentioned on MarksDailyApple web site), the Polynesians and early Africans did well without grains, they got their energy from other foods and I think kept a nice even blood sugar level.  
Re coconut oil, I use only a little, as a topping, more for flavour.  I still use more ghee (home made), and olive oil, a little butter.  I have not had a chance to read up about coconut oil, maybe it has some palmatic acid/fats.  My ancestry is European and Aboriginal and I don't think they were using a lot of coconuts/oils, so for me, I just use a little; not every day.  Some use it for antifungal effects, I prefer to use raw garlic or herbs for that purpose!  Plus it is a bit too costly for me to use much of.  I will make a home mad sweet at end of the month, with cacao butter & almond butter in it; at least cacao has some omega 3 fatty acids in it!.  Must go now.  Best regards.  Amanda
Posted by: Lin, Friday, November 16, 2012, 1:23am; Reply: 14
DL,
I sometimes get reactions to Quinoa, so now I'm wondering if it is different strains I've bought.
Oats I tested mildly sensitive to years ago and have mostly avoided.
I find I do best with rice.  Buckwheat I also reacted to for a while, seems okay now.
good luck.
Lin
Posted by: Melissa_J, Friday, November 23, 2012, 4:56am; Reply: 15
It's not a grass seed, but is still a seed, which is where plants concentrate their lectins.  So lectin sensitive individuals may still have trouble with it.  Soaking and sprouting may help.

The lectins in quinoa don't seem to target specific blood types, as I think most are allowed it on BTD...check TypeBase to be sure.

After healing any leaky gut and lectin sensitivity issues, those who couldn't tolerate it may be able to again.  

My kids love it, we call it smily rice, because it has little smiles on it.
Posted by: lux, Friday, November 23, 2012, 2:04pm; Reply: 16
quinoa should be cooked very well, or my experience, could give swelling types A. I advise you not to eat it for dinner.

http://lacucinadilux.wordpress.com/2012/11/08/farinata-di-quinoa-e-sesamo/
http://lacucinadilux.wordpress.com/2012/11/19/couscous-di-quinoa-di-evi/
http://lacucinadilux.wordpress.com/2012/07/17/castagnaccio-di-quinoa/

;D
Posted by: purlgirl, Friday, November 23, 2012, 5:50pm; Reply: 17
Lux  - your links look really good - but not there not English - Aaaa  - Italian  :D
Posted by: lux, Friday, November 23, 2012, 6:18pm; Reply: 18
google translator? :o
;)
Posted by: Lola, Friday, November 23, 2012, 6:27pm; Reply: 19
previously soaked in acidulated water
Posted by: yvonneb, Friday, November 23, 2012, 10:12pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from PCUK-Positive
I rinse my organic Quinoa to within an inch of it's life (you can never rinse it enough IMO) then soak my Quinoa over night again rinsing it thoroughly before then sprouting it for 24 hours rinsing ever 8 - 12 hours then ferment it for 24 hours.

It's wonderful stuff.

I do the same with my rice although the initial soaking is about 24 hours for it.


Hi PC!

Why do you do all the soaking and rinsing? I kinda remember, but since you are always so well up on this stuff, could you just outline it for me again, please?

Thanks!
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Saturday, November 24, 2012, 1:04am; Reply: 21
Hi Yvonneb - Well the rinsing is to get rid of the bitter taste an anti nutrient  think. the soaking allegedly increases the nutrient value somehow, the fermenting makes it easier to digest and apparently reduces the phytic acid (this stuff allegedly reduces the uptake of vitamins and minerals. the sprouting in between is also to increase the nutritional value I believe although it is a while since I was researching all that to be honest. enough to say that after months of looking into it I decided to do it so it must be right ;)

what harm can it do? is another view of course.

I do all this with every grain or seed or what ever, millet, rice, amaranth.....

it might not even me necessary for somme blood type O's but being a lesser spotted nonnie I do these things lol
Posted by: SquarePeg, Sunday, November 25, 2012, 3:31am; Reply: 22
I tolerate quinoa very well.  But I can also eat rice and spelt and well-soaked oat bran.
Posted by: yvonneb, Sunday, November 25, 2012, 10:26pm; Reply: 23
Quoted from PCUK-Positive
Hi Yvonneb - Well the rinsing is to get rid of the bitter taste an anti nutrient  think. the soaking allegedly increases the nutrient value somehow, the fermenting makes it easier to digest and apparently reduces the phytic acid (this stuff allegedly reduces the uptake of vitamins and minerals. the sprouting in between is also to increase the nutritional value I believe...

That's what I remembered (well kinda  :))- thanks for refreshing!
Quoted from PCUK-Positive
...although it is a while since I was researching all that to be honest. enough to say that after months of looking into it I decided to do it so it must be right ;)

That's what I do as well!  ;D It's just too much to remember...I research, decide on the bottom line for me and then it's on my mental backburner ;D ;D

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