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BTD Forums  /  SWAMI Xpress  /  what are "peas" ?
Posted by: BHealthy, Sunday, September 9, 2012, 10:32pm
My SWAMI lists "peas" as a superfood.  "Peas" for me are green peas either frozen without their pod, or fresh and requiring shelling.

When I look them up in the TYPEbase the description for PEA / GREEN/ YELLOW reads:

"The fact that this LEGUME is entirely edible � including the pod � accounts for its French name, mange-tout, or "eat it all." Its almost translucent, bright green pod is thin and crisp. The tiny seeds inside are tender and sweet. Snow peas are available year-round with peak seasons in the spring and fall. Choose crisp, brightly colored pods with small seeds. Refrigerate in a plastic bag for up to 3 days. Both tips of a snow pea should be pinched off just before using. They're an essential vegetable in Chinese cooking and may also be used raw in salads. Snow peas are also called Chinese snow peas."

The description is clearly for snow peas.

There is no listing for either 'green pea' or 'snow pea'.

Which vegetable is my SWAMI referring to?

Posted by: Lloyd, Sunday, September 9, 2012, 11:56pm; Reply: 1
Quoted from BHealthy


Which vegetable is my SWAMI referring to?



The vegetable with the same name in the USDA Nutrient Database, i.e. peas.
Posted by: JJR, Monday, September 10, 2012, 12:31am; Reply: 2
Can't you eat the pod of any peas?  The peas on the inside of snow peas are peas.  It just still has the pod.  I thought you could eat the pod of green peas also, if you want to.  It's just a little thicker.  

No?
Posted by: Drea, Monday, September 10, 2012, 12:46am; Reply: 3
Quoted from JJR
Can't you eat the pod of any peas?  The peas on the inside of snow peas are peas.  It just still has the pod.  I thought you could eat the pod of green peas also, if you want to.  It's just a little thicker.  

No?


Yes, fresh peas (in the pod) off the vines are sweet, crunchy, and delicious!
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, September 10, 2012, 12:51am; Reply: 4
It all depends what stage of harvesting the pea pod is at:  very young pods are very tender and their peas are fairly small inside ... you can eat them raw or lightly sautee.  The longer the pods stay in the plant, the tougher the pod becomes, to the point that they are not edible any more and their peas inside need to be shelled (they are then dry peas which require longer cooking to make them edible).  :)
Posted by: Victoria, Monday, September 10, 2012, 1:06am; Reply: 5
My SWAMI classifies peas as Vegetable Protein, which I consider to be when I eat frozen green peas.

When I buy fresh peas, they are flat with crisp pods and have what appears to be tiny,  immature peas inside.  I doubt that they offer much protein at all, so I have considered them to be in the Live Food category
Posted by: Cristina, Monday, September 10, 2012, 1:09am; Reply: 6
Good point Victoria ...
Posted by: Lola, Monday, September 10, 2012, 1:57am; Reply: 7
I buy dried whole
love sprouting these 4 to 5 days, then cook

also grind the sprouted dehydrated into flour
Posted by: BHealthy, Monday, September 10, 2012, 2:27am; Reply: 8
Quoted from Victoria
My SWAMI classifies peas as Vegetable Protein, which I consider to be when I eat frozen green peas.

When I buy fresh peas, they are flat with crisp pods and have what appears to be tiny,  immature peas inside.  I doubt that they offer much protein at all, so I have considered them to be in the Live Food category

According to this website, http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/green-peas.html, "Snow peas or sugar snap peas are different species of peas where the whole immature green pods are eaten."

Based on everyone's replies, can I assume that all peas -- green, snow, and sugar snap -- are superfoods for me?
Posted by: Lola, Monday, September 10, 2012, 2:33am; Reply: 9
yes
Posted by: Amazone I., Monday, September 10, 2012, 6:45am; Reply: 10
:o :-/(naughty)the french name of peas is: petit pois...which also can be translated into : little weight ...;) ;D....
I guess the yellow- ones and other colours might be confonded with lentils ??) in french = lentille.... ;D ;D ;D



                                   (whistle)
Posted by: D.L., Monday, September 10, 2012, 1:27pm; Reply: 11
What about black-eyed peas and field peas?
Posted by: Amazone I., Monday, September 10, 2012, 1:47pm; Reply: 12
aren't those estimated under *beans* ??) or leguminouses??)......(wiseman)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, September 10, 2012, 2:04pm; Reply: 13
Black eyed-peas definitely have a separate rating from "peas".
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Monday, September 10, 2012, 2:46pm; Reply: 14
Blackeyed peas are actually more closely related to beans.
Posted by: Jenny, Monday, September 10, 2012, 8:40pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from Amazone I.
:o :-/(naughty)the french name of peas is: petit pois...which also can be translated into : little weight ...;) ;D....
I guess the yellow- ones and other colours might be confonded with lentils ??) in french = lentille.... ;D ;D ;D



                                   (whistle)


I have always found that yellow dried peas make the best Indian dal in comparison with that made from lentils which tend to be a bit floury for my taste. It is helpful to be aware of the difference between pea dal and lentil dal as some genotypes have very different ratings for these.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Monday, September 10, 2012, 11:40pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from D.L.
What about black-eyed peas and field peas?


For black-eyed peas use the rating for black-eyed peas.

Field peas can be a wide variety of beans, first determine what you are actually dealing with -- A black eyed pea variant, a lima bean variant, a butter bean variant ... Then use the rating for whatever bean variety is closest to what you call field peas.
Posted by: D.L., Tuesday, September 11, 2012, 1:41pm; Reply: 17
My father-in-law used to grow what he called "field peas". They were shaped like small black-eyed peas but were a light greenish color. How can you tell what variant they are? Lima beans are a Swami avoid for me.
     Also, what is the difference between a butter bean and a Lima bean? They look the same to me, but Lima beans are a Swami avoid.
Posted by: Amazone I., Tuesday, September 11, 2012, 2:48pm; Reply: 18





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