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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Fructose and Water Kefir?
Posted by: tolondontoparis, Wednesday, August 8, 2012, 3:06pm
Water kefir is so good for you with it's probiotic benefits, but the kefir leaves back fructose, which is apparently a metabolic inhibitor...but don't fruits contain fructose? It just seems like everything good is bad. It's so annoying.
Posted by: Lloyd, Wednesday, August 8, 2012, 3:22pm; Reply: 1
There is nothing wrong with natural fructose in small amounts. Fruit has some.

High fructose corn syrup is another matter.  ;)
Posted by: ABJoe, Wednesday, August 8, 2012, 3:25pm; Reply: 2
Quoted from tolondontoparis
It just seems like everything good is bad. It's so annoying.

Much of the "bad" depends on how processed and / or what quantities you are talking about or who it is for.  Almost everything can be helpful (or harmful) given the right circumstances...  
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, August 8, 2012, 10:22pm; Reply: 3
Water kefir is very low in overall sugars, so I can't imagine it would have very much fructose left at the end of fermentation.

Too much fructose is a metabolic inhibitor. "Fructose" as an added ingredient in processed foods (and as its own entry in the typebase) is corn-based. That's different from fructose naturally found in some foods. Natural foods such as water kefir contain healthful probiotics, fruit contains antioxidants and  vitamins, etc. The total food is evaluated, not just the fructose component.
Posted by: tolondontoparis, Wednesday, August 8, 2012, 10:37pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from ruthiegirl
Water kefir is very low in overall sugars, so I can't imagine it would have very much fructose left at the end of fermentation.

Too much fructose is a metabolic inhibitor. "Fructose" as an added ingredient in processed foods (and as its own entry in the typebase) is corn-based. That's different from fructose naturally found in some foods. Natural foods such as water kefir contain healthful probiotics, fruit contains antioxidants and  vitamins, etc. The total food is evaluated, not just the fructose component.


Ruthie! You saved the day again!!
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Thursday, August 9, 2012, 11:20am; Reply: 5
From what I understand the bacteria consumes all/most of the dextrose but leaves the fructose, giving water kefir its slightly sweet taste
Posted by: Drea, Thursday, August 9, 2012, 1:08pm; Reply: 6
You can ferment the water kefir longer (or add less sugar) to make it less sweet (that's what I do).
Posted by: Possum, Tuesday, August 14, 2012, 4:38am; Reply: 7
Don't you have to be careful using less sugar? I read it was possible to end up starving the kefir "grains"? :-/
I have just started producing my first ever kefir, so keen to learn all I can...  
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, August 14, 2012, 5:05am; Reply: 8
Yes, you do have to straddle the line between just enough sugar to feed (and propagate) the kefir grains, and not having the final brew be too sweet. I've found, in my altitude and water source, that 1 gallon of water to 4 scant scoops of grains, use 8 Tbsp of sugar, and still make 25% more grains, after 48 hours.
Posted by: Possum, Tuesday, August 14, 2012, 5:07am; Reply: 9
Thanks Drea ;)
Posted by: BluesSinger, Tuesday, August 14, 2012, 10:50am; Reply: 10
This is the first of heard of Water Kefir.. what is it?
Posted by: Drea, Tuesday, August 14, 2012, 1:35pm; Reply: 11
Quoted from BluesSinger
This is the first of heard of Water Kefir.. what is it?


Check out this thread: Water Kefir & Kombucha Adventures for everything you want (and didn't want) to know about the subject! :D
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