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BTD Forums  /  Live Right 4 Your Type  /  Elevated IGF-1 and protein consumption
Posted by: 14940 (Guest), Tuesday, August 7, 2012, 5:46pm
I watched a programme on the TV last night called ‘Eat, Fast and Live Longer.’ It was part of the series of BBC programmes called ‘Horizon’ which focus on recent scientific developments in various fields. The programme focused on recent studies that suggest that too much protein (it didn’t say how much is too much) raises IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor hormone), which is linked to increased risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some forms of cancer.

(The ‘Fast’ bit of the programme title by the way refers to skipping food, not doing things speedily  :))

Anyway, I’m kinda worried … I have recently started doing the BTD again in a bid to improve my health and now I’m worried that I’m eating too much protein. I have Swami and am an Explorer, which gives me less protein, but I wanted to do the BTD because I’ve done it well in the past but I don’t seem to quite manage to keep to my Swami guidelines – I don’t know why, I think I might just like the ‘stricter’ diet …)

I’ve looked on this forum but can’t find anything about link between elevated IGF-1 and protein consumption, so thought I’d ask: what is Dr D’Adamo’s view on this? Sorry if this has already been covered - I couldn't find it  :)

Many thanks!  :)
Posted by: grey rabbit, Wednesday, August 8, 2012, 12:41am; Reply: 1
Don't know what Dr. D has to say, but the general rule of thumb is .8g/kg body weight for adults, up to twice that amount is considered safe.
Posted by: 14940 (Guest), Wednesday, August 8, 2012, 10:38am; Reply: 2
Thank you, Grey Rabbit  :) I've spent some time browsing the internet (not finding very much, to be honest - and much of it conflicting) and it seems that protein is restricted to less than .8g/kg body weight for reduction in IGF-1.

I have just found a blog by a British nutritionist called Patrick Holford about it. I quite like Patrick Holford although he does promote a one-size fits all diet - he seems sensible though. Here's the link:

http://www.patrickholford.com/index.php/blog/blogarticle/1237/

A couple of quote from this that address this protein/IGF-1 relationship:

"Horizon recommended eating less protein to bring down IGF-1, but failed to mention that the biggest promoter is dairy products. This is why my low-GL diet, which is specifically designed to keep insulin down, includes very little meat or dairy products."

"If your goal is to live long and be healthy it’s better to have lower IGF-1 levels, achieved by eating a more plant-based, less meat and dairy based diet."

I get that BTD O Type diet isn't 'high protein' exactly but I am still a bit concerned that the amounts promote high IGF-1. I'm sorry if this seems a really stupid beginners concern - when I did BTD before I loved it and encouraged others to do it, but I don't want to be doing something detrimental to my body while thinking I'm giving it the best chance of being healthy, if you see what I mean  :)
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Wednesday, August 8, 2012, 10:56pm; Reply: 3
None of Dr D's diets are unbalanced. We all have slightly different nutritional needs, and that includes the need for protein. Yes, we all need protein in our diets, and we would all be harmed by consuming nothing but protein. But the exact amount that becomes "too much" may vary from person to person.

If you're following the suggested serving sizes in SWAMI, then you're not getting "too much protein." You're getting the right amount for you personally. The serving sizes for meat in Dr D's programs are much lower than you'll find in many popular low-carb diets, with a much greater emphasis on vegetables.

My guess is that the individuals who had poor blood test results from "too much protein" fell into one (or both) of the following categories:

1) Type A individuals who should have been eating lots of veggies, fruits, and beans and modest amounts of grains, who were instead eating only fatty meats and greens- a poorly balanced diet for their body types, which lead to disease.

2) People who ate humongous quantities of protein and weren't eating anywhere near enough vegetables. Even a type O can eat too much protein if you have 4 eggs for breakfast, an 8 oz steak for lunch  and half a chicken for dinner.

Fasting has been discussed on this forum before. Some individuals do great on it- for them, it was "the missing link" and enabled them to get their appetite under control and really get into biochemical balance.  Many like the freedom of "not having to prepare so many meals." However, others tried it and did horribly; with blood sugar dropping too low between meals, or feeling "too heavy" after eating a huge meal (which is necessary when you eat less often.) No great harm is done if you give it a try, as long as you listen to your body and feed yourself more frequently if you find it's not working for you.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, August 8, 2012, 11:49pm; Reply: 4
none of these postures sees the abo part of the equation

you are on the right track :)
Posted by: 14940 (Guest), Friday, August 10, 2012, 9:40am; Reply: 5
Thanks Ruthiegirl and Lola.

I understand about everyone's protein needs being different and that none of the studies take blood type into account. I suppose I am just going to have to trust that Dr D has taken IGF-1 into account  :)

On the whole I do trust these diets - they seem to be the most sophisticated of all I've seen - but I wish I could find something in which Dr D has addressed this particular issue.

Does anyone know of anything? Thanks.
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Friday, August 10, 2012, 11:12am; Reply: 6
I watched the programme too Ruby, whilst it was very informative, it took no account of blood type, so IMO was unfortunately flawed from the outset.

Likewise the two extremes of fasting one day and eating whatever you liked every other day although made to sound reasonable is ridiculous IMO.

Short term Fasting is nothing new and has been discussed on here on many occasions too.

by the way, whereabouts in the Uk are you?
Posted by: 14940 (Guest), Friday, August 10, 2012, 12:10pm; Reply: 7
Hi Policychecker, you're probably right and I should stop worrying  :) (Although I'd still like to see something written by Dr D about it  ;) )

I guess the best thing for me to do would be to try and embrace my Swami Explorer diet - I am given less meat on it than I am on the O type diet - I just can't figure out why I struggle giving it a go; I've been managing to do the O type diet ok.

And yes, I thought the "fasting one day and eating whatever you like the next day" idea was ridiculous, too  :)

I live in England, in the West Midlands  :)
Posted by: 14940 (Guest), Friday, August 10, 2012, 12:11pm; Reply: 8
... and I'm glad to hear from someone else who watched it!   :D
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Friday, August 10, 2012, 12:19pm; Reply: 9
My partner is an explorer and now eats less meat and poultry but likes fish. she does so much better on less protein, less fruit and few grains.

and plenty of attention on her liver

she is from west Bromwich originally. maybe it's nothing to do with explorers and more to do with being a brummie ;)

as a matter of interest have you read the geno type book? it's helpful when trying to understand the geno diet which is the precursor to swami.
Posted by: 14940 (Guest), Friday, August 10, 2012, 4:58pm; Reply: 10
Your partner liking fish has destroyed my pet theory that Brummies aren't supposed to eat fish because we don't live anywhere near the sea  ;)

Yes, I have read the GenoType Book, and as it happens, I've just started reading it again. Maybe it'll provide me with the kick up the backside to get back to my Swami diet that I need!  :D
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Friday, August 10, 2012, 6:03pm; Reply: 11
yeap she like fish and she is a super taster as well as being a chef lol

have you looked at doing the genographic project test to enhance your swami. it susses out your genetic path to where you live now.

http://shop.nationalgeographic.com/ngs/browse/productDetail.jsp?productId=2001486

this is different to the one i did which was earlier but pretty similar
Posted by: Captain_Janeway, Saturday, August 11, 2012, 4:10am; Reply: 12
Quoted from 14940
I watched a programme on the TV last night called ‘Eat, Fast and Live Longer.’ It was part of the series of BBC programmes called ‘Horizon’ which focus on recent scientific developments in various fields. The programme focused on recent studies that suggest that too much protein (it didn’t say how much is too much) raises IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor hormone), which is linked to increased risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some forms of cancer.

(The ‘Fast’ bit of the programme title by the way refers to skipping food, not doing things speedily  :))

Anyway, I’m kinda worried … I have recently started doing the BTD again in a bid to improve my health and now I’m worried that I’m eating too much protein. I have Swami and am an Explorer, which gives me less protein, but I wanted to do the BTD because I’ve done it well in the past but I don’t seem to quite manage to keep to my Swami guidelines – I don’t know why, I think I might just like the ‘stricter’ diet …)

I’ve looked on this forum but can’t find anything about link between elevated IGF-1 and protein consumption, so thought I’d ask: what is Dr D’Adamo’s view on this? Sorry if this has already been covered - I couldn't find it  :)

Many thanks!  :)


The problem that I have with this study is the fact it neglects to say that inflammation promoting foods are the cause of the above mentioned health problems. The wrong proteins whether from plant or animal sources can cause inflammation which raises IGF. Ingesting problematic lectins may also contribute to inflammation.

This type of dietary information is one size fits all. It's akin to saying that eating too much fat is going to cause obesity. I would personally be more concerned about consuming inflammatory foods.
Posted by: Joyce, Saturday, August 11, 2012, 8:10am; Reply: 13
Surely depends on the protein for type?

Just imagine the damage gluten causes for so many - and these days extra seems to be listed in the ingredients of factory bread, over and above the naturally higher gluten content of modern varieties of wheat.
Is that to keep it softer longer?

I used to tolerate a small amount of bread, now I can't even chew the modern gobby stuff.
Posted by: 14940 (Guest), Saturday, August 11, 2012, 10:54am; Reply: 14
Policychecker - wow, I'd never come across that genographic project test before! How fascinating. I'm not sure I'm willing to shell out $200 for it though ...  :)

Captain_Janeway - yes, I'm sure you're absolutely right that it's the inflammatory foods that cause the metabolic syndrome problems listed above rather all protein, irrespective of quality and whether it's abo compatible, etc.

Joyce - yes, I know what you mean about factory bread - it's hideous isn't it? A friend of mine (not doing BTD or even very interested in diet at all, to be honest) has found that he can't tolerate bread here although he doesn't get the same gastrointestinal issues with bread in France. He reckons it's because of the difference in the way it is made. He moved to France :) He must like his bread, haha!  :D
Posted by: Dr. D, Saturday, August 11, 2012, 11:00am; Reply: 15
The applicability of that advice is not universal. Your sensitivity to IGF-1and the need to modulate it with food is already factored into the GTD. It is the reason why you compare upper and lower leg length and leg to torso ratios.
Posted by: 14940 (Guest), Saturday, August 11, 2012, 12:17pm; Reply: 16
Thank you Dr D. That one's sensitivity to IGF-1 has already been factored into the GTD is what I wanted to know  :D

The other kind folks on this message board had already convinced me that I didn't need to worry about protein consumption, but your comment has nailed it  :) Back to the Explorer diet with renewed enthusiasm then!   :D
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, August 14, 2012, 8:25pm; Reply: 17
;D
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