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BTD Forums  /  Live Right 4 Your Type  /  What does Dr. D. think about root canals?
Posted by: narnia, Thursday, August 2, 2012, 4:15am
There is much literature on the internet that root canals should be avoided at all costs because they can cause all kinds of problems...systemic illness as well.  They contend that the infection is never completely cleaned out and one winds up with a perpetual infection in your jaw that lingers in and around your tooth to give you all kinds of health problems.  And also, that you should never leave something dead in your body.  

The literature by practicing dentists say that root canals are safe and wonderful.

Does anyone know what Dr. D. thinks about them?

Thanks all!
Posted by: Lola, Thursday, August 2, 2012, 5:28am; Reply: 1
http://www.bing.com/search?cp=1252&FORM=FREESS&q=root+canals&q1=site%3Adadamo.com


years of compliance have definitely been a blessing to my teeth and gums


without a doubt I can say, the guidelines have stopped my tooth decay and receding gum issues dramatically

in the cancer book, Dr D makes very clear how the state of your teeth is key to healing and prevention.....

in other words, prevention and oral hygiene go hand in hand
Posted by: Goldie, Thursday, August 2, 2012, 6:58am; Reply: 2
No matter what...


If you have INFECTIONS under your tooth, then the body is telling you something is wrong with your immune system.. It needs to be dealt with, there are two to four options.. 1) antibiotics, or 2) pulling your tooth to prevent contamination of the tooth next to it.

This 3. option then requires to implant a tooth replacement made out of titanium I think /forgot. IT is costly and if the gums can be seen then there is a good chance that the gums will shrink back and all will look ugly in time.  there is nothing you can do about that.  IF the gums are not seen when talking then it is a ok procedure, but in my case, I was miserable for years of suffering from gum shrinkage.. over that implant one needs crowns and sometimes a bridge.. (Lucky for me my gums don't show or I would need a set of false teeth by now) I have bridges all over my teeth already.. they never look as good as your own teeth.  

The 4. and oldest option, is to save the tooth by root canal. (considered the least invasive).

I had most of my teeth root canaled, BUT NOT because I ever got on infection, I never allowed the situation to progress to that level.  In my toot I always felt it when the nerves where going bad, with pain on heat, which is the classic sign that there is 'gas' from 'fermentation' forming under or around the tooth root.  Cold will take that pain away.  Classic test heat then cold ..

Doing root canal saves the tooth structure.. yet in time one ends up needing crowns to prevent the tooth from splitting..

There is no other option.. the best option is to never go to that 'low immune system response' health wise, but most people have no control over that. BTD helps..

You do not need to wait until you get on infection, if you see your dentist upon pain on heat, the dentist should be able to prevent the infection from ever becoming visible on x ray by doing root canal work.  

If you can see a dark space under any tooth on xray, then it is because you waited toooo long... risking a serious infection (dark space) that will spread.  It most often can not go away by medication nor by it self. It is a serious situation by then. In the olden days only extraction saved life.

OR... if you are prone to overall gum disease, you have more wrong with your body immune system showing a need to address overall health.   BTD helps..

Sometimes gum disease can be helped by gum surgery, but that has to happen long before infection sets in.. Infection is a serious issue, loosing a tooth is also.  Replacing a lost tooth is most important to prevent further losses by teeth 'shifting' out of place.

The material used to fill a root  canals does not infiltrate the bone, as it is placed just to the end of the root.  / has been used for many decades.  

To prevent a tooth from going bad under the root, it is most important to never allow a high painful spot -on biting- after a filling to develop on any tooth.. take on emery board and file down the high spot slowly and very carefully!!


Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Thursday, August 2, 2012, 7:16am; Reply: 3
Root canal is never necessary and creates disease.

fillings are rarely necessary and create more disease.

commercial tooth paste is not necessary and creates disease.

need I go on? ;)


Posted by: Goldie, Thursday, August 2, 2012, 11:57am; Reply: 4
If you have cavities or PAIN you do need HELP..

maybe not good for you buit there are times,,,  the end results with good teeth hygienics you live a healthier life!

Yet this is not addressing her question..
Posted by: narnia, Thursday, August 2, 2012, 2:57pm; Reply: 5
I had a root canal done 7 years ago.  I have not had any issues with it, but I have been reading recently that these things are poisonous to have in one's body.  Therefore, I am asking.

I have been feeling great since getting on the BTD 2.5 years ago.
Posted by: angel, Thursday, August 2, 2012, 7:45pm; Reply: 6
About 4 years ago or so, I had all of my silver (mercury amalgam) fillings replaced with white composite. It did help my energy some but the damage had already been done. Over 34 years of those things had done their deed. I grind my teeth a lot at night. I had a sleep study done 2 weeks ago-they said I grind so hard and long it causes muscle pain which keeps me from fully sleeping and wakes me at night. Which would explain my sole root canal with porcelain crown breaking off at the gum line. I currently have temp with post in place until my new porcelain crown is made. I am very sensitive to metals and I have even reacted to titanium. (I got the ring at Jared and brought it back less than 24 hours later with a rash on on my finger.) So porcelain it is. My kids get nothing but composites for fillings. The kids are not as bad as I was, my dental work started at 3 years old. Theirs was closer to 5-6.

If you can avoid it do. But pray about your options and go from there. I know that sounds funny. But believe me it is the only way I know to get a confirmation on the right thing to do. With my health every time I see a doctor, I am at odds with 'good' medical practice it has taken awhile for me to find doctors whoa re willing to listen to me and work with me. Being as I have to live with the treatment.

Good luck-feeling your pain literally.
Posted by: narnia, Thursday, August 2, 2012, 9:13pm; Reply: 7
Yay!  I just found a holistic dentist!  She referred me to an electro-dermal screener to see if anything is going on with the root-canaled tooth!!  She can tell whether or not there is bacteria, virus, etc.  She will also do a dental materials bio-compatibility test!!

I am so excited that now I can work with someone who cares about my whole body health!!
Posted by: dAne+, Thursday, August 2, 2012, 9:47pm; Reply: 8
Oil Pulling has had "reported" oral health benefits, earthclinic.com is a pretty good resource for testimonies.  Some have claimed enamel regrowth.
Posted by: AKArtlover, Monday, August 6, 2012, 2:14am; Reply: 9
Ok, so my dog has a hole/dark spot in a  bottom front tooth- he has an underbite- and the vet cleaned all the teeth and said he might have 6 months to a year left on the tooth. I am now brushing it daily and gums are less inflammed and tarter spots are going away and it's looking better. Is it bad to let it stay? I haven't had a chance to research this.
Posted by: TJ, Tuesday, August 7, 2012, 1:05am; Reply: 10
Quoted from narnia
What does Dr. D. think about root canals?
I don't suppose he likes them any more than anybody else. :-/
Posted by: Mrs T O+, Saturday, September 1, 2012, 8:16pm; Reply: 11
I first heard about this from Dr. Mercola (I don't get his info any more.).
Some of us feel he is a little bit of an alarmist who is trying to sell products.

I have one root canal that I got in 1980-1(Dec.-Jan.!). I don't feel pain in the root area. But after hearing that root canals may have problems, I assume the only thing to do short of removing the tooth is to make sure the immune system is good to avoid infection.

There will be many scares, but it reminds us to take care of ourselves & is a good reminder to stay compliant!
Posted by: Patty H, Sunday, September 2, 2012, 2:53am; Reply: 12
Narnia, I have no idea what Dr. D would say, but I can tell you what my holistic dentist(s) have said.  And that is that it all depends.

For instance, while out of state at college, my 20-year old son slipped and fell on a wet floor last year and came down and broke three of his front teeth.  One of two front teeth was broken so badly that the root was just about exposed.  All of this happened around the time when I had found a holistic dentist to safely remove all of my amalgams because I am toxic in lead and mercury.  Fearing what might be put in his mouth or done to him, I located a local holistic dentist in the state he is in and made an appointment for him.  The dentist stated that he would probably need a root canal on the front tooth in question.  I spoke with both her and my local holistic dentist at length and both gave me similar answers:  because he is young and they are his front teeth, every effort should be made to make sure that his teeth look good and are as healthy as possible.  I ordered a blood test which can tell which dental products he can tolerate so that all of his dental work would be done with products that should not cause problems.

So I guess the answer is that even holistic dentists sometimes believe that root canals are necessary.
Posted by: narnia, Friday, January 10, 2014, 8:12pm; Reply: 13
Sorry for the delay in my follow-up.  The screening showed that I had no infection in my tooth.  There was no indication to pull the tooth.  However, the ceramic crown with gold inlay that I had for 7 years tested really bad for me, so the dentist chose zirconium for the new crown.  

I could tell an immediate difference in the way that I felt after having the old crown removed!!  I felt like a blanket of tiredness had been removed from my body!!


Posted by: C_Sharp, Friday, January 10, 2014, 10:27pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from angel
About 4 years ago or so, I had all of my silver (mercury amalgam) fillings replaced with white composite. It did help my energy some but the damage had already been done. Over 34 years of those things had done their deed. ... Which would explain my sole root canal with porcelain crown breaking off at the gum line. I currently have temp with post in place until my new porcelain crown is made.


The same thing happened in my case.
Posted by: RedLilac, Saturday, January 11, 2014, 2:32pm; Reply: 15
I used to go to a natural dentist but she was out-of-network & even if she was in her prices were way over what the insurance states.  I had all my mercury filings removed by her.  She didn’t believe in root canals so would pull the teeth.  Now the in-network dentist I’m going to wants to do a bridge/dentures because my gum in my upper left side is hard & growing down.  I also have a flip tooth smack dap in the middle of my upper teeth.  The receptionist is going to give a cost estimate.  I’m debating because of the price.  Has anybody else had this issue from teeth being pulled out?
Posted by: ABJoe, Saturday, January 11, 2014, 4:04pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from RedLilac
...She didn’t believe in root canals so would pull the teeth.  Now the in-network dentist I’m going to wants to do a bridge/dentures because my gum in my upper left side is hard & growing down...  ...Has anybody else had this issue from teeth being pulled out?

It is my understanding that the reason we want to hold onto natural teeth as long as possible is because once the natural teeth are pulled the gum recedes and hardens - which is why once the teeth have been gone for some time, the dentures don't fit the same/are hard to keep in place / hurt more / etc...
Posted by: Nadira, Sunday, January 12, 2014, 12:51am; Reply: 17
IMO, one of the reasons to keep teeth is so that one can chew!  Being an O, I need to be able to chew that great beef.  ;)

I do not have 'wisdom' teeth because they were pulled or never came in.  I had all 4 of my 1st bicuspids pulled so that I could have orthodontic work done.  So that already put me at 24 teeth left.  A number of years ago I had my 2nd molars on my right side, both upper and lower, pulled because I didn't have the $ for the root canals.  22 left.  Fillings on the 1st molars on the right side.  I held out as long as possible for tooth #3, but finally had to have root canal done on it.

Those were all pre-BTD.  Fillings in left side of mouth as well.  Last month had to have a root canal done on the 1st molar, lower left.  Lots of antibiotics, and still taking 4 pro-biotics a day.  The doc who did the root canal said I was sliding down the slippery slope for the 2nd one as well.

That one has amalgam fillings, so I'm going to have that tooth pulled when I go in for the crown on the 1st molar.

Oh, and BTW, I learned on 'Law & Order, Criminal Intent' why my teeth were worse on my right than on my left.  It's because people brush more vigorously on the side of their mouth that is opposite from their dominant hand....(dance)
Posted by: Spring, Monday, January 13, 2014, 6:09pm; Reply: 18
Sometimes root canals can develop an encapsulated infection at the end of the root which can be next to impossible to treat with antibiotics. But that is not necessarily a death knell to the tooth. The dentist can go through the gum and surgically remove it. That happened to me over twenty-five years ago, and I have never had a problem with the tooth since. Knock on wood, of course! I am all for staying on my diet and supplements, both of which, I think, are the best things we can do for our teeth.
Posted by: Spring, Monday, January 13, 2014, 6:24pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from ABJoe

It is my understanding that the reason we want to hold onto natural teeth as long as possible is because once the natural teeth are pulled the gum recedes and hardens - which is why once the teeth have been gone for some time, the dentures don't fit the same/are hard to keep in place / hurt more / etc...


I had to wear braces when I was in my early thirties because of crowding. The adjoining teeth simply moved into the extra space left by the teeth they had to pull with no change in the gum. I had a wisdom tooth pulled a few years ago (since I have been on the diets), and even without wearing braces, the gum has not receded, and the dentist elected to do nothing about a replacement. He told me I would never miss it, and I haven't.

Maybe the reason for a lot of the receding gum problem has to do with a gum problem that was already there. That happened to my dad. He had perfect teeth (this was 60-70 years ago) but had to have them pulled because of gum disease (or less than perfect diet). He suffered from ill-fitting dentures the rest of his life because of his gums. Who knows, a more suitable diet may have improved his gums the same way our diets improve ours, even after having the teeth removed!
Posted by: Christopher1, Wednesday, January 15, 2014, 8:14pm; Reply: 20
Regular dentists suck. Sorry to put it so plainly.

Fluoride, mercury, root canals, x-raying - and they sure make a lot of money!

Go to one of those holistic dentists. It's worth the extra money.
Posted by: Patty H, Thursday, January 16, 2014, 12:25am; Reply: 21
I had a front, lower tooth pulled because of infection and I regret that decision every day.  The partial that I wear is uncomfortable and causes sores and pain on a daily basis.  If I had it to do over again, I would have done oil pulling to try to work out the infection.  It is believed the tooth had died, but I wish I had not listened to my HOLISTIC DENTIST on this one.  I think he did a great job on safely removing my amalgam and other dental issues, but I feel we should have taken a more conservative approach to removing a front tooth that requires a partial or a bridge.  BTW, ABJoe  stated that removing teeth causes the gums to recede.  In my case, it wasn't just the gums. When I had the infected tooth removed, I waited quite a while to start the process for a dental implant, since it was a prominent front tooth.  I show my lower teeth more when I smile than my upper teeth and I understand this becomes more common as we age.  I went through the painful process of having the tooth removed, getting a partial (which is a fake tooth on what looks like a retainer), wearing that until the area was sufficiently healed, going in for the placement of the post, only to find out that the post placement failed (after 2 1/2 hrs of torture in the dentist chair) because the bone had eroded due to the infection to the point that it could not support the post.  Then I needed to let that surgical procedure heal before I can have the bridge done.  Again, all of this was with a holistic dentist who I like very much and feel had my best interest in mind, but as with anything, we are all individuals and need to make informed decisions.  As a non-secretor, I have terrible teeth and have been dealing with dental issues for years.  I don't know that I am any better off for having had that tooth removed.
Posted by: aussielady582, Thursday, January 16, 2014, 4:10am; Reply: 22
I have a feeling that the state of the large intestine(colon), ie intestinal health is related to teeth/dental health, to my own experience and reading.
I've also had lots of problems in the past, and am trying hard to avoid major dental procedures, so for me.... raw juices, raw veg, raw fruit, etc, and as others said, good oral hygeine & exercise too.
Also good to remember, as many people over the age of around 37 or so, metabolism can go down, then maybe we need to eat less, especially later in the day, to avoid fermentation/putrification of wastes/food in the digestive system.
The raw foods provide the enzymes etc esp for those of us who have weak systems and lack the digestive fire and enzymes.
I agree about the holistic dentists, a good idea!
I know a man with a few canals, he never eats raw food or any vegetable, nor much fresh produce! don't we need balance & fresh whole foods in our diet/nutrition?
Thank goodness I no longer eat dairy foods, baked flour or any baked product, as well the processed foods, with sugar. Went to dentists for ages, not one asked me about my diet or my digestive health!!
Posted by: aussielady582, Thursday, January 16, 2014, 4:11am; Reply: 23
oh and, green tea!
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, January 16, 2014, 2:49pm; Reply: 24
Quoted from Christopher1
Regular dentists suck. Sorry to put it so plainly. Fluoride, mercury, root canals, x-raying - and they sure make a lot of money!

Go to one of those holistic dentists. It's worth the extra money.


All of them don't by any means. I LOVE my dentist! But there are crooks in every profession. Happily, though, from what I have seen, people who are working hard to have good health have less and less need for dental work! It has certainly been the case with me.
Posted by: Averno, Thursday, January 16, 2014, 6:08pm; Reply: 25
Quoted from Christopher1
Regular dentists suck. Sorry to put it so plainly.

Fluoride, mercury, root canals, x-raying - and they sure make a lot of money!

Go to one of those holistic dentists. It's worth the extra money.


My dentist tries to foist root canals and procedures on me at every turn. He does good work where I allow it, but I have to keep him on a short leash. I read somewhere that as much as 50% of such procedures are exploratory. Meaning "let's go in and see if this is really necessary".

Posted by: Spring, Friday, January 17, 2014, 3:46am; Reply: 26
Quoted from Averno
My dentist tries to foist root canals and procedures on me at every turn. He does good work where I allow it, but I have to keep him on a short leash. I read somewhere that as much as 50% of such procedures are exploratory. Meaning "let's go in and see if this is really necessary".


I've read plenty of horror stories about dentists that are just like you describe. I pity people who get taken to the cleaners by them. It is hard to imagine a dentist wanting to do a root canal unless it was an absolute last resort.
Posted by: narnia, Tuesday, May 6, 2014, 6:31pm; Reply: 27
I would still love to know if Dr. D has any particular views on this subject of root canals.

I am asking because of this article that I got recently via email:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/05/03/root-canal-alternative.aspx?e_cid=20140503Z1_DNL_art_1&utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art1&utm_campaign=20140503Z1&et_cid=DM45439&et_rid=509178817

You can watch the video instead.
Posted by: Dr. D, Tuesday, May 13, 2014, 12:09pm; Reply: 28
Root canals, if done well, are generally well-tolerated, despite the hysterical pronouncements. However, they fundamentally only postpone the inevitable, as the tooth, now dead, cannot remineralize, so eventually it just wears out or cracks.
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Tuesday, May 13, 2014, 1:55pm; Reply: 29
Root canal is a waste of money-- better to just go for the implant learned that the hard way--- but will never have a root canal again.
Posted by: deblynn3, Tuesday, May 13, 2014, 2:05pm; Reply: 30
Thinks, I've never had one so now I won't.  ;D
Posted by: Lloyd, Tuesday, May 13, 2014, 2:41pm; Reply: 31
Quoted from Andrea AWsec
Root canal is a waste of money-- better to just go for the implant learned that the hard way--- but will never have a root canal again.


I had a root canal done in 1990 that is doing just fine, thank you. Never had a problem with it.

Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, 3:07pm; Reply: 32
Quoted from Lloyd
I had a root canal done in 1990 that is doing just fine, thank you. Never had a problem with it.

I have some older than that, and so far they are still doing great. I suppose a lot of problems people had with implants a long time ago have been weeded out now, hopefully they have, but I've known people whose doctor cracked the bone trying to "install" the things, and they were inflicted with major sinus problems for the rest of their lives. I'm sure that thousands of them have been "installed" correctly, though, or they wouldn't still be doing them.
Posted by: susanC, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, 3:54pm; Reply: 33
Quoted from Dr. D
Root canals, if done well, are generally well-tolerated, despite the hysterical pronouncements. However, they fundamentally only postpone the inevitable, as the tooth, now dead, cannot remineralize, so eventually it just wears out or cracks.


In the process of a root canal all living material is cleaned out of the roots and they are filled with--well some sort of filling material.  The tooth is now dead. Given enough time encapsulated abscesses may form down at the tips of the roots.  These do not show up with the x-ray equipment that most dentist offices have.  The endodontist will have more precise equipment, or in my case the holistic dentist I finally resorted to had such (expensive) equipment.  And, as DrD says, the tooth will cease to mineralize and eventually will fail--in most cases.  I guess one has to live long enough. ;)

I had 4 teeth with root canals. All done by an endodontist--because I believe in specialists for such procedures.  One of these molars ending up cracking--and two others formed those little abscesses down in the roots.  Mind you, regardless of the state of your immune system, the roots are now dead and filled with artificial material and thus the roots are now more prone to infection than they ever were when alive.  

I now have one root canaled tooth left and will have that removed before it gives me trouble.  At the time my rooted canaled teeth were extracted I had bone grafts put in.  Simple procedure that rebuilds the bone and keeps the gums from shrinking away--and sets the stage for the implants.  

To look at my mouth--my teeth are beautiful and I have cared for them well--but still had had so many large fillings in my back molars as a child and eventually those traumatized teeth will fail.  I have to agree with DrD here.  If I had it to do over again, I would have skipped the root canal stage (which did buy me about 20+ years), bite the bullet and go for implants.

So many people have those little abscesses forming that are not picked up by any but the most sophisticated x-ray equipment.  And those abscesses will run down our systems and lead to much larger healthy problems.  

Bottom line--a root canaled tooth is a dead tooth.

Posted by: Lloyd, Wednesday, May 14, 2014, 5:22pm; Reply: 34
Quoted from susanC


Bottom line--a root canaled tooth is a dead tooth.



The bottom line is actually to take care of your teeth and gums so as to minimize the potential for later trouble.

Everything else that follows is a matter of personal preference and affordability. There is plenty of room for error with implants. It is also possible to get an abscessed implant as well. (peri-implantitis)

Quoted from Wikipedia
Success or failure of implants depends on the health of the person receiving it, drugs which impact the chances of osseointegration and the health of the tissues in the mouth. The amount of stress that will be put on the implant and fixture during normal function is also evaluated. Planning the position and number of implants is key to the long-term health of the prosthetic since biomechanical forces created during chewing can be significant. The position of implants is determined by the position and angle of adjacent teeth, lab simulations or by using computed tomography with CAD/CAM simulations and surgical guides called stents. The prerequisites to long term success of osseointegrated dental implants, are healthy bone and gingiva. Since both can atrophy after tooth extraction pre-prosthetic procedures, such as sinus lifts or gingival grafts, are sometimes required to recreate ideal bone and gingiva.
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, May 15, 2014, 12:59am; Reply: 35
Quoted from susanC
Given enough time encapsulated abscesses may form down at the tips of the roots.  These do not show up with the x-ray equipment that most dentist offices have.  The endodontist will have more precise equipment, or in my case the holistic dentist I finally resorted to had such (expensive) equipment.  And, as DrD says, the tooth will cease to mineralize and eventually will fail--in most cases.  I guess one has to live long enough. ;)Bottom line--a root canaled tooth is a dead tooth.  


The regular dentists I go to and have gone to certainly have and had the "equipment" to see anything worth seeing in a person's mouth. I had an abscess form on the tip of a tooth with a root canal, the dentist found it right away, removed it, and I have never had a problem with it since. That was well over  twenty-five years ago. I would think the longevity of the "fix" speaks for itself.
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Thursday, May 15, 2014, 11:29am; Reply: 36
Quoted from Lloyd


I had a root canal done in 1990 that is doing just fine, thank you. Never had a problem with it.



Maybe not you Llyod--

But loads of us have had a problem at some point.

Mine lasted 15 years but finally needed to be replaced after it cracked.

no one size fits all answer here--





Posted by: Lloyd, Thursday, May 15, 2014, 12:22pm; Reply: 37
Quoted from Andrea AWsec



Mine lasted 15 years but finally need to be replaced.

no one size fits all answer here--





Exactly. As I said above it's a matter of personal choice, hopefully with a view to related issues that could influence the decision.

And 15 years is fairly substantial in my view. I wouldn't view that as a failed treatment.
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, May 15, 2014, 12:27pm; Reply: 38
I wonder if there are not as many or more websites loaded with horror stories about implants as there are about root canals, and root canals are sure a lot cheaper! I just took a glance at some of those horror stories, and it is plain scary. Then, there are plenty of problems with bridges out there too.

There was an article in the Readers Digest some years ago about someone going around the country to different dentists to get work done on his mouth. To start with, he didn't have ANY problems but a good number of the dentists DID find "problems!" One even pronounced that to fix his mouth it would cost upwards of $25,000!! So it surely pays to know your dentist!
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Thursday, May 15, 2014, 2:27pm; Reply: 39
The cost of root canal -- is very high the cost of the implant is very high. Given the choice i would have preferred to pay once.

I paid for  a root canal and an implant, I am sure there are regional differences in cost.

I will never have a root canal again-- I prefer to pay once rather then twice.

Lloyd did I do something to you that causes you to sort of pick on everything I say?

I apologize if I did-- but in the last few months you have decided that everything I say is some how a point of disagreement.   ::)

Why not just delete my comments if you are unhappy with them.
  :-/
Posted by: Lloyd, Thursday, May 15, 2014, 3:23pm; Reply: 40
Quoted from Andrea AWsec

Lloyd did I do something to you that causes you to sort of pick on everything I say?

I apologize if I did-- but in the last few months you have decided that everything I say is some how a point of disagreement.   ::)

Why not just delete my comments if you are unhappy with them.
  :-/



I wonder if maybe you are taking things personally that shouldn't be. Be Happy.

And I certainly don't delete comments just because they make me unhappy. If I have a reason to make a point of disagreement with anything,  the idea that I could or would delete someone's comments for frivolous reasons would definitely be one.
Posted by: susanC, Thursday, May 15, 2014, 3:36pm; Reply: 41
Speaking for myself Lloyd--the fact that I had failed root canals--or the fact that I needed them in the first place--had nothing to do with lack of oral hygiene or regular trips to the dentist.  I guess it all boils down to having an allowing immune system--a system that seems to harbor low level pathogens--BTD or not.  

Andrea and I seem to have had similar root canal experiences.  My abscessed tooth apparently lingered on for years without giving off any signals of pain.  But my body was sickened and running down.  Was it the cause of my breast cancer a year before the tooth was identified as a problem--I don't know.  The holistic dentist thought so.  Not sure I'd go that far, but the low level infection made me sick all over, evidenced by how much better I felt after its removal.

So excuse Andrea and me for our attitudes toward root canals.  And I think it's great for all those people who will never have issues.  But maybe this thread will help just a few who may need the head's up.
Posted by: Lloyd, Thursday, May 15, 2014, 4:10pm; Reply: 42
Quoted from susanC
My abscessed tooth apparently lingered on for years without giving off any signals of pain.


I'm glad that the implants worked out for you.

As you say, they will be right for some people while others will not need them. There are advantages and disadvantages to both approaches. There is a lot to consider.

Personal experiences are important. Both yours and mine.





Posted by: Spring, Thursday, May 15, 2014, 6:37pm; Reply: 43
Quoted from susanC
Andrea and I seem to have had similar root canal experiences.  My abscessed tooth apparently lingered on for years without giving off any signals of pain.  But my body was sickened and running down.  Was it the cause of my breast cancer a year before the tooth was identified as a problem--I don't know.  The holistic dentist thought so.  Not sure I'd go that far, but the low level infection made me sick all over, evidenced by how much better I felt after its removal.

A lot scarier is you could have died from a heart attack. We have a friend who WAS a dentist, and he had some dental work done by another dentist. Our friend didn't know it, but he had a valve problem that caused him to come almost to within a breath of death from severe infection. He was left very disabled to the point that he had to give up his well-established practice entirely. Very sad indeed.
Posted by: Spring, Thursday, May 15, 2014, 6:50pm; Reply: 44
But the truth of the matter of this whole discussion is that whatever procedure is chosen THERE ARE RISKS. There is no getting around it. I was going through tremendous stress in my life when I developed the abscess on my root canal. Did that have anything to do with it happening? I don't know, but we have learned too much this far not to know that stress can even be a killer, let alone influence dental problems. So, again, we are all different. And sometimes we are simply more lucky than we feel we deserve. Every time I get that thumb's up from my dentist after a checkup, I feel very lucky indeed! He checks my lymph glands, my thyroid and my sinuses - every time. And, occasionally, he checks for cancer of the mouth. He is a great guy.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Thursday, May 15, 2014, 7:39pm; Reply: 45
Of course it's ideal to keep your teeth healthy and not need root canals or implants- but we don't live in an ideal world. Many of us have health issues left over from before we knew about BTD, including oral health problems.
Posted by: Lloyd, Thursday, May 15, 2014, 8:51pm; Reply: 46
Quoted from ruthiegirl
Of course it's ideal to keep your teeth healthy and not need root canals or implants- but we don't live in an ideal world.


Anyone who lives long enough will have dental issues. That's a given. No one is arguing that a person did or didn't take care of their teeth. Good oral hygiene will help delay the inevitable whatever your past history in that area is.

And there are other options. Bridges were mentioned. I know someone who is going to have all their teeth pulled and get fitted for dentures.
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