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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Allergic Reactions
Posted by: Rev144, Saturday, July 7, 2012, 2:23am
Back in Dec I did a water fast.  Coming off of that I Started to ER4YBT, where I cut out all the bad stuff.... wheat, corn, soy, tomato, ect...  I was feeling better.  A few months later, I ate some zucchini bread that was in my freezer and it make me ill for about 30 hours.  I started making spelt bread and it did not bother me.   I was eating coconut flour muffins once or twice a week.  I had no problems.  In April, I did another water fast and after coming off of that, I could not eat spelt bread anymore.  I stopped eating bread.  Every morning I have a green smoothie with a handful of baby carrots in it.  All the sudden, my tongue and lips start feeling like I  have pins sticking in them.  My chiropractor told me that I was allergic to carrots ( I did not tell him I was eating carrots)  So I stop eating carrots and the tingly tongue goes away.  Then I find a caoco 65% chocolate bar at the  health food store. It did not have any of my avoids in it.  I ate some of it...  Then I kind of went on a splurge and ate some every week for about 3 weeks, and made coconut muffins with carob chips .  I started producing  stinky pits  ( this has happened in the past if I ate something not good for me -  like nutter butter cookies) and my feet started stinking.  So I stop eating that and my stink went away.  Last week we made some coconut waffles ( oh they were good) in a short time, my skin was almost hurting, I felt like someone was poking me with a sharp object all over my body, I felt agitated and my lips and tongue were tingly again. This went on for 30 hours or so. So I am thinking that it is my vanilla , as I had made it a year ago with organic vodka made with wheat.  So today, I have another coconut muffin WITHOUT the vanilla in it.  Low and behold.....  within about 15 minutes my skin starts to itch...  I get shooting pains thru my body, but not as bad as last weeks.   I had eaten my breakfast at 8 am, my lunch was a salad and the muffin was about 15 min after lunch.  

I was reading on line that since the wheat in the vodka was distilled that is should not bother me.  Is this correct?   What is the best alcohol to use when making tinctures or your own vanilla?  Or is there another way to make vanilla not using alcohol?

I was so hoping that it is not the coconut flour that I used because I just bought a large amount of it on sale from tropical traditions.  Last week was the first time I used it.  In the past I have used Bobs Red Mill.  Has anyone had problems with this coconut flour?

Here is my coconut muffin recipe.  Is there anything in it that might be the culprit or I should question?

6 Eggs  ( I eat eggs daily, so this isnt it)
4 Tbsn  Butter   ( I eat this daily too)
1/2 cup of honey ( or sugar) I usually only put in 1/4 cup
1/2 tsp Real Salt
1 tsp vanilla
1/2 cup sifted coconut flour
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/3 cup of unsweetened flaked coconut
(bake 20 min at 400)

I dont eat many sweets.... other than waffles this is pretty much my junk food for the week .

Thanks for any help.....   I am kind of burned out because Its like every time I find something I like I develop reactions to it.  Actually, it waits to let me know I have issues with it until after I buy a large amount of it!!!

Posted by: Conor, Saturday, July 7, 2012, 3:10am; Reply: 1
Hi Rev144, if you have pollinosis issues, especially tree-related, in October 2006 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) identified coconut as a tree nut. I've read that, as a tree nut, coconut is homologous and able to elicit clinical cross-reactivity in some individuals. If pollinosis is an issue, a number of sites list foods that cross-react with pollen.
Posted by: Possum, Saturday, July 7, 2012, 3:53am; Reply: 2
Also coconut is often sulphited... :-/
Posted by: Rev144, Saturday, July 7, 2012, 4:09am; Reply: 3
From their web site: http://www.tropicaltraditions.com/organic_coconut_flour.htm

Tropical Traditions organic coconut flour is fiber from the coconut meat after most of the oil has been extracted to make Virgin Coconut Oil. It is certified organic, unsweetened, and has not been treated with sulfites
Posted by: Possum, Saturday, July 7, 2012, 4:29am; Reply: 4
Well it's good you can rule that out then... ;) Sure hope you get to the bottom of this mystery?!
Posted by: Conor, Saturday, July 7, 2012, 10:26am; Reply: 5
Quoted from Rev144
What is the best alcohol to use when making tinctures or your own vanilla? Or is there another way to make vanilla not using alcohol?

I wouldn't say it's the best, but here's what I use as an alcohol base for both culinary and tonic extracts/tinctures:

Mediums other than alcohol can be used, however, I find that alcohol provides the best means of DIY extraction of essential oils, et cetera. Glycerine and vinegar can both be used as an alternative to alcohol. I don't have any experience using them, though (other than once briefly experimenting with making some herbed vinegars with apple cider vinegar and some wine vinegars). Here's some additional information ...

Quoted from Wikipedia
Glycerine can also be used, but is generally a poorer solvent. Vinegar, being acidic, is a better solvent for obtaining alkaloids but a poorer solvent for acidic components . . . Glycerol, utilized in a non-critical fashion as it was in early Eclectic medicine studies, is typically seen as inferior to alcohol, whereas if glycerol is subjected to an innovative serialized methodology now catching on in the industry, the tincturing potential of glycerol is quite astounding. Therefore, newer glycerite products are showing great promise and even rivaling alcoholic tinctures in many ways.
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Saturday, July 7, 2012, 10:58am; Reply: 6
Is there anything in it that might be the culprit or I should question?

6 Eggs  ( I eat eggs daily, so this isnt it){it could be a cross reaction with the eggs it's also a lot of eggs anyway}
4 Tbsn  Butter   ( I eat this daily too){butter is only a neutral for you-try using ghee to test reaction}
1/2 cup of honey ( or sugar) I usually only put in 1/4 cup {honey is also only neutral for you little point in using honey if you are going to heat it to that temperature and also is a big hitter as far as allergies go, specially if not raw} sugar is a complete waste of time if you are trying to solve problems just avoid it!
1/2 tsp Real Salt {use sea salt only}
1 tsp vanilla {vanilla is also only neutral for you causes all sorts of problems with people}
1/2 cup sifted coconut flour {coconut is and avoid for you}
1/2 tsp baking powder {is this gluten and aluminium free- usually it's not}
1/3 cup of unsweetened flaked coconut (coconut is an avoid for you }
(bake 20 min at 400)

I dont eat many sweets.... other than waffles this is pretty much my junk food for the week . (well actually you do eat sweets, honey is a sweet and so is a cup of "sugar" lol . What is in the waffles exactly?}

kind regards

Posted by: D.L., Saturday, July 7, 2012, 1:35pm; Reply: 7
Coconut hasn't shown up on a skin test or my IgG4 blood tests. However, I have sinus reactions and sore tongue whenever I eat coconut. It is also an avoid on both my Swami and Eat Right4 Your Type, blood type A
Posted by: Rev144, Saturday, July 7, 2012, 4:47pm; Reply: 8
Quoted from PCUK-Positive

6 Eggs  ( I eat eggs daily, so this isnt it){it could be a cross reaction with the eggs it's also a lot of eggs anyway} The recipe makes 6 muffins, so its only one egg per muffin, I will see if I can find out how to see if it is some kind of cross reaction
4 Tbsn  Butter   ( I eat this daily too){butter is only a neutral for you-try using ghee to test reaction}Will Do!
1/2 cup of honey ( or sugar) I usually only put in 1/4 cup {honey is also only neutral for you little point in using honey if you are going to heat it to that temperature I should have mentioned, I used organic sugarand also is a big hitter as far as allergies go, specially if not raw} sugar is a complete waste of time if you are trying to solve problems just avoid it!I suppose you are right, the 1/4 cup I used breaks down to less than a tablespoon per muffin
1/2 tsp Real Salt {use sea salt only}I am not understanding why sea salt from the polluted ocean is any better than Real Salt mined deep in the earth?  It is not white table salt and has all the minerals .  http://www.realsalt.com
1 tsp vanilla {vanilla is also only neutral for you causes all sorts of problems with people}I left the vanilla out of this batch and still had the problem, not saying that it did not contribute to the problem when I had the  waffles
1/2 cup sifted coconut flour {coconut is and avoid for you}is it an avoid for Nomad B's?
1/2 tsp baking powder {is this gluten and aluminium free- usually it's not}It is suppose to be aluminum free, but I dont know about gluten free, as I have had it before all this stuff started.  
1/3 cup of unsweetened flaked coconut (coconut is an avoid for you }
(bake 20 min at 400)

I dont eat many sweets.... other than waffles this is pretty much my junk food for the week . (well actually you do eat sweets, honey I dont eat honey, it messes with my blood sugar too much. is a sweet and so is a cup of "sugar" lol there are 4 tablespoons of sugar in 1/4 cup, each muffin had less than a tablespoon of sugar. . What is in the waffles exactly?}


4 TBSP butter
1/4 cup Coconut flour
6 eggs
2-4 Tbsp fruit puree
2 Tbsp honey or sugar
1/4 tsp salt
makes 8 waffles


Quoted from Conor
as a tree nut, coconut is homologous and able to elicit clinical cross-reactivity in some individuals. If pollinosis is an issue, a number of sites list foods that cross-react with pollen.

What exactly does this mean? If a certain tree is pollinating it may make me react to the coconut flour?


Quoted Text
Sure hope you get to the bottom of this mystery?!With everyones help, I hope to... thanks!



Quoted Text



[color=purple]Thanks everyone for your  input ;D
Posted by: Lola, Saturday, July 7, 2012, 4:59pm; Reply: 9
try more real food like bone broth and veggies for a while....forget the muffins or lower the servings
watch those frequency values
Posted by: Rev144, Saturday, July 7, 2012, 5:07pm; Reply: 10
got a link for the bone broth?  (how to?)  

As it stands now, I eat a very large green smoothie every morning, small one at lunch or snack, a spinach salad for lunch, along with some red kidney beans or small white beans, and usually for dinner, I will have either another spinach salad with beans or steak or a steak and steamed veggies.  I am afraid if I eat any more greens, my skin is going to start changing colors!   ;D

The muffin is a once a week thing... waffle are a once a week thing...  so two meals a week are coconut.

Thanks
Posted by: Victoria, Saturday, July 7, 2012, 5:08pm; Reply: 11
Coconut is an avoid for type B.  Both Secretors and Non-Secretors.  

Sorry - -  :-/

http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?120

It is a Black Dot Toxin for Nomads.  My body tells me it is way bad for me - although I used to love it so much.  :)
Posted by: Rev144, Saturday, July 7, 2012, 5:12pm; Reply: 12
Quoted from Victoria
Coconut is an avoid for type B.  Both Secretors and Non-Secretors.  

Sorry - -  :-/

http://www.dadamo.com/typebase4/depictor5.pl?120


Would coconut oil and coconut flour (meat) be considered the same thing?  The oil is a beneficial on Swami for B nomad.  

Thanks for your input
Posted by: Conor, Saturday, July 7, 2012, 6:19pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from Rev144
What exactly does this mean? If a certain tree is pollinating it may make me react to the coconut flour?

The short answer is yes. A cross-reactivity to coconut has shown up in individuals that previously had no allergic reactions to other tree nuts. However, others in their above posts have made some good points, too, about additional foods--e.g., eggs, honey and such--all of which, especially honey in certain people, can provoke an immune response. Here's an explanation of cross-reactivity using an apple as an example of a cross-reactive food ...
Quoted from Clinical and Molecular Allergy
Clinically, allergic cross-reactivity is often encountered as symptoms without prior exposure. Another common clinical situation is the occurrence of symptoms upon exposure to allergenic sources that are unlikely to sensitise, such as apples. In Northern Europe it is rare to find apple allergy in the absence of birch allergy. The major birch pollen allergen acts as the sensitizer or primary allergen, which by definition is able to trigger the immune system to produce IgE antibodies. The homologous protein in apple Mal d 1 is an incomplete allergen, because it is unable (or: extremely inefficient) to induce IgE antibodies, but is able to elicit symptoms due to its ability to trigger mast cells loaded with IgE anti-Bet v 1.

As well as a cursory explanation of how/why cross-reactivity occurs ...
Quoted from Allergic Cross-Reactivity: From Gene to the Clinic
A large number of allergenic proteins have now their complete cDNA sequences determined and in some cases also the 3D structures. It turned out that most allergens could be grouped into a small number of structural protein families, regardless of their biological source. Structural similarity among proteins from diverse sources is the molecular basis of allergic cross-reactivity. The clinical relevance of immunoglobulin E (IgE) cross-reactivity seems to be influenced by a number of factors including the immune response against the allergen, exposure and the allergen. As individuals are exposed to a variable number of allergenic sources bearing homologous molecules, the exact nature of the antigenic structure inducing the primary IgE immune response cannot be easily defined. In general, the cross-reactivity term should be limited to defined clinical manifestations showing reactivity to a source without previous exposure. Co-recognition, including by definition cross-reactivity, could be used to describe the large majority of the IgE reactivity where co-exposure to a number of sources bearing homologous molecules do not allow unequivocal identification of the sensitizing molecule. The analysis of reactivity clusters in diagnosis allows the interpretation of the patient’s reactivity profile as a result of the sensitization process, which often begins with exposure to a single allergenic molecule.

Here is a list of foods that have been shown to cross-react with various pollens:

If you've ever been diagnosed as being allergic to any tree nut, you'd be better off avoiding coconuts because of this and the potential for cross-reactivity. For example, in a study to identify cross-reactive antibodies between coconut and other tree nuts, reserchers found:
Quoted from Annals Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2004 Feb;92(2):281-4.
RESULTS:Positive skin test results occurred to the coconut and multiple tree nut extracts. In vitro serum specific IgE was present for coconut, hazelnut, Brazil nut, and cashew. Immunoblots demonstrated IgE binding to 35- and 50-kDa protein bands in the coconut and hazelnut extracts. Inhibition assays using coconut demonstrated complete inhibition of hazelnut specific IgE, but inhibition assays using hazelnut showed only partial inhibition of coconut specific IgE.

CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates the presence of cross-reactive allergens between hazelnut (a tree nut) and coconut (a distantly related palm family member). Because there are many potentially cross-reactive allergens among the tree nuts, we recommend patients with coconut hypersensitivity be investigated for further tree nut allergies.


References
http://www.clinicalmolecularallergy.com/content/5/1/2
http://foodintolerances.com/pdf/allergy-cross-reactivity-gene-to-clinic-2005.pdf
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14989401
Posted by: ABJoe, Saturday, July 7, 2012, 6:28pm; Reply: 14
Quoted from Rev144
Would coconut oil and coconut flour (meat) be considered the same thing?  The oil is a beneficial on Swami for B nomad.

The rating is probably not the same...  The oil is rated (in SWAMI) under Fats and Oils, while the coconut meat is rated under Fruits.  

Also, just because your SWAMI print for B Nomad shows a specific rating, doesn't mean it is this rating for all people of that type...
Posted by: Conor, Saturday, July 7, 2012, 6:34pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from Rev144
got a link for the bone broth? (how to?)

Am crossposting the following link from a post made by 'policychecker' in another thread. Excellent reference for homemade bone broth ...
Posted by: Rev144, Monday, July 9, 2012, 8:54pm; Reply: 16
Thank you everyone for your replies and help!
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, July 9, 2012, 9:24pm; Reply: 17
Coconut itself is an avoid for Bs and for Nomads. The oil is a different story- an avoid for all but O nonnies on BTD, but OK for many people on GTD and SWAMI.

Another possible culprit in the baking powder is cornstarch.

I've found that I can simply omit vanilla from many recipes and it doesn't affect the flavor all that much. You may want to try that in future baking, at least until you can  find a compliant vanilla.  Since you're a B, you can probably tolerate potatoes, so see if you can find potato vodka to use for this purpose. If you find vodka labeled "kosher for Passover" then it's likely made from potatoes.

I know it's frustrating that you just bought a large quantity of good-quality coconut flour and coconut flakes, but you shouldn't be eating them, period. Try using almond flour in future baking, in the same recipes you used for coconut flour.
Posted by: Possum, Tuesday, July 10, 2012, 12:12am; Reply: 18
Even with "less than a tablespoon each of sugar" per muffin?? :-/  imo is still a lot of sugar, especially if you have more than one muffin a day?! Some people react to sugar more, when it is combined with fat... ??)
Posted by: BTypeAUS, Tuesday, July 10, 2012, 2:03pm; Reply: 19
Following this thread with interest re coconut oil...I'm a B nomad, is it an avoid? I eat it every day ..please don't say I can't  :-/ ;D
Posted by: Goldie, Wednesday, July 11, 2012, 5:27pm; Reply: 20
from left field... sugar alone was easy to give up.. foods with sugar in them make me want more and more...

I would switch to plain Trehalose if I ate sugar in the house.. and cut all recipes in half at least or even to one third.. one gets used to the flavors instead of the overwhelming taste of sugar..

takes a few weeks but no more than 6.. in coffee tea or some other stuff.. it's a mind over matter and the body-mind follows..
Posted by: Rev144, Friday, July 20, 2012, 9:29pm; Reply: 21
Out of curiosity, and trying to find out why I had such a bad reaction all the sudden to coconut flour, I made more muffins out of the old coconut flour (Bobs Red Mill). I also did not use my vanilla made with organic wheat vodka.  I found some simply organic vanilla (gluten free) in my cupboard and used it.   Low and behold.......  I had no reactions to the Bobs Red Mill Coconut Muffins.  Then I put some of the Tropical Traditions flour and some of the Bobs Flour in their own jars and had my chiropractor test them on me to see If I had reactions.  I was not able to see which jar he had, and it showed that I had reactions to the tropical traditions flour.  

I know I am not suppose to have coconut flour, I just like to know why and what I react to.  

My next project is why my legs around my sock line break out in a big red rash while its hot.  The rash is right above my sock line.   I have tried 4 kinds cotton /nylon socks.  All making me have a ring around my leg of red swollen bumps.  The worse sock was my cotton one (  I wonder if it was made from GMO cotton?)  I tested with two different kinds of laundry soap...  Calben 5 star soap and EOS soap.  All made me break out.   Then I wore a pair of my merino wool socks (medium weight winter socks), and I had no break out.  I stopped at the store and bought a few pair of merino wool summer socks  ( those things are spendy!!!) I wore a pair without washing it.  I had no break out on my legs.  But it was hot outside and my neck broke out in a rash from my black T shirt.  I will wash the sock and see if I have another episode of rash or none at all??
Posted by: ABJoe, Friday, July 20, 2012, 10:49pm; Reply: 22
Quoted from BTypeAUS
Following this thread with interest re coconut oil...I'm a B nomad, is it an avoid? I eat it every day ..please don't say I can't  :-/ ;D

Per the Genotype Diet book for Nomad, pg. 275: Coconut oil, extra virgin is a Diamond Superfood; Coconut oil, commercial is an Avoid.
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