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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Organic Chicken vs Commercial Chicken
Posted by: Rev144, Friday, June 29, 2012, 5:47pm
Being a B, I am not suppose to have chicken.   Were these test done on people who ate organic chicken or commercial feed lot GMO chicken?  Does it make a difference if your chicken is pasture raised on green grass, goats milk and  bugs compared to stuck in a huge barn with 30 thousand other chickens?

Is chicken all the same no matter how it was raised?
Posted by: Lloyd, Friday, June 29, 2012, 6:12pm; Reply: 1
Quoted Text
AVOID: Contains lectin or other agglutinin


That holds true no matter how the chicken was raised. Sorry.  :)
Posted by: ABJoe, Friday, June 29, 2012, 6:50pm; Reply: 2
Quoted from Rev144
Is chicken all the same no matter how it was raised?

Yes!  As a B (or AB), it is best to choose to eat different poultry!
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Friday, June 29, 2012, 7:31pm; Reply: 3
Organic chicken is a better choice than conventional chicken, for those of us who can eat chicken. Since you're a B, you'd probably do better eating conventional beef or conventional turkey rather than organic chicken, since the chicken protein itself is harmful for you. Yes, the organic chicken will be lower in pesticide residues and have a healthier lipid profile, but it will still be toxic for your body.
Posted by: Rev144, Friday, June 29, 2012, 8:02pm; Reply: 4
Thank you for your replies.   I was just curious because we are in a position to raise chickens, actually we are, and using them for dog food.  Just like everything else that is factory made, I thought it might be ok if it was home made.  Possibly something different in the chicken because it was not getting all the horror- mones and other gross stuff.   As a back up, we are raising 21 turkeys...  We only raised two last year, the Tom butchered out at 38 lbs and the and the Hen was 22 lbs..... They made for some good eating!

Thanks again!
Posted by: Melissa_J, Friday, June 29, 2012, 9:06pm; Reply: 5
If you can raise chickens, maybe you can also raise other small animals that are fine for Bs?  Turkeys, pheasant, and rabbits are a few choices.

I know very little about raising any animals, so I'm no expert on that part, but I'd consider it if it were an option for me.
Posted by: yvonneb, Friday, June 29, 2012, 9:22pm; Reply: 6
Quoted from Melissa_J
If you can raise chickens, maybe you can also raise other small animals that are fine for Bs?  Turkeys, pheasant, and rabbits are a few choices


Have been toying with those ideas myself and decided against it on the grounds that I still carry the food to the animal which makes it lazy and hence 'fat'- not the muscular meat that Dr.D advocates. Wild rabbit and pheasant are what the food lists mean. As for turkey  :-/ I never saw a wild one for sale here...

Wonder if there's a way to raise all of the above 'wild'....I'd love that ;D -no cage to clean, no food and water to carry, no attachment, no tears at slaughter time and great meat!

Might have to start a thread on this... ;D ;D
Posted by: ABJoe, Friday, June 29, 2012, 11:33pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from yvonneb
Have been toying with those ideas myself and decided against it on the grounds that I still carry the food to the animal which makes it lazy and hence 'fat'- not the muscular meat that Dr.D advocates. Wild rabbit and pheasant are what the food lists mean.

If you feed the rabbit alfalfa pellets only, it can be in a cage and not get fat.  A grain diet will change the lipid profile, but the hay only will be fine.  

You could also make a "run" with a woven wire bottom, so grass grows up through it for the rabbit to live in.  You do have to make sure it has water, though...
Posted by: chud, Saturday, June 30, 2012, 12:15am; Reply: 8
Try cutting out chicken for a week or two, and eat turkey instead.  
I think you will be able to answer your own question after that, based on how you feel.

Quoted from Rev144
Being a B, I am not suppose to have chicken.   Were these test done on people who ate organic chicken or commercial feed lot GMO chicken?  Does it make a difference if your chicken is pasture raised on green grass, goats milk and  bugs compared to stuck in a huge barn with 30 thousand other chickens?

Is chicken all the same no matter how it was raised?


Posted by: Victoria, Saturday, June 30, 2012, 12:40am; Reply: 9
It has been mentioned on the Forum in the past that there is a correlation between eating chicken and suffering from strokes, for type B's.  I wouldn't touch the stuff.   :X  (although I was raised on it - homegrown, healthy birds)  They were my type B grandmother's chickens and she had two strokes.  
Posted by: Rev144, Saturday, June 30, 2012, 1:55am; Reply: 10
Strokes dont sound good, especially since I am prone to migraines!    Guess I will stick with the turkey, grass fed beef and hair sheep...  



Posted by: ABJoe, Saturday, June 30, 2012, 2:16am; Reply: 11
Quoted from Rev144
Strokes dont sound good, especially since I am prone to migraines!    Guess I will stick with the turkey, grass fed beef and hair sheep...

Stay away from chicken and corn and I would venture that most of the headaches will go away as the toxin load in the body goes down...

My dad(AB) finally stopped eating chicken and his strokes have stopped for about a year now...  I asked Mom 3 times to stop giving him chicken, but she didn't make the connection until the third and is really happy with the results.  He is getting better enough that he is complaining of other symptoms - probably corn related...  So it is the next avoid she is going to be removing from his diet.

Sooner or later, she'll remove all of his avoid foods...  ;)
Posted by: chud, Tuesday, July 3, 2012, 2:04am; Reply: 12
Quoted from Victoria
It has been mentioned on the Forum in the past that there is a correlation between eating chicken and suffering from strokes, for type B's.  I wouldn't touch the stuff.  


I believe it.  Do you have any links though?  I'd like to read more.
Posted by: Conor, Tuesday, July 3, 2012, 2:15am; Reply: 13
Quoted from chud
I believe it.  Do you have any links though?  I'd like to read more.

Quoted from Doctor D'Adamo
Another very common food that Type Bs should avoid is chicken. Chicken contains a Blood Type B agglutinating lectin in its muscle tissue. Although chicken is a lean meat, the issue is the power of an agglutinating lectin attacking your bloodstream and the potential for it to lead to strokes and immune disorders. Dr. D'Adamo suggests that you wean yourself away from chicken and replace them with highly beneficial foods such as goat, lamb, mutton, rabbit and venison.


URL: http://www.dadamo.com/bloodtype_B.htm
Posted by: Spring, Tuesday, July 3, 2012, 3:31am; Reply: 14
I don't think it would ever work for me to try to raise any kind of living, breathing thing for food that could become a pet. My dad went through that with us when we were kids!!
Posted by: 2degreespisces, Tuesday, July 3, 2012, 7:38am; Reply: 15
Quoted from Spring
I don't think it would ever work for me to try to raise any kind of living, breathing thing for food that could become a pet. My dad went through that with us when we were kids!!


I have an ongoing debate about that with my husband. He wants to keep chickens for eggs and meat, but I couldn't kill or eat the animals I've cared for and lived with. I just couldn't.
He doesn't see what the fuss is about, however, and would happily prepare a dish with chicken breast from our own chicken  ::)
Posted by: Conor, Tuesday, July 3, 2012, 1:21pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from 2degreespisces
I have an ongoing debate about that with my husband. He wants to keep chickens for eggs and meat, but I couldn't kill or eat the animals I've cared for and lived with. I just couldn't. He doesn't see what the fuss is about, however, and would happily prepare a dish with chicken breast from our own chicken ::)

Of course this is coming from a Hunter perspective (and a male, at that), but chickens simply aren't that endearing of a barnyard animal ... especially by comparison to cows, goats, pigs, sheep, et al (even ducks are more good natured). I kind of view chickens the same way I do barn cats; i.e., both have their place but we get along best when we keep our distance from one another. (ok) Despite Pixar's best efforts to anthropomorphize chickens into these cuddly, delightful creatures, the fact remains that they're annoyingly vile little birds. It would be so much easier for me to take one of them to the chopping block than any of the other aforementioned animals. On the other hand, I don't eat chicken. There's healthier and tastier—not to mention less obnoxious—fowl out there. (drool)
Posted by: BTypeAUS, Tuesday, July 3, 2012, 2:40pm; Reply: 17
Us B's are lucky, we can eat dairy instead of chicken, and to be honest I never liked chicken  :-/
Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, July 3, 2012, 3:40pm; Reply: 18
Quoted from chud
I believe it.  Do you have any links though?  I'd like to read more.

This is stated in the most description I've seen anywhere in Eat Right 4 Your Type, pages 148-149...
Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, July 3, 2012, 3:48pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from 2degreespisces
I have an ongoing debate about that with my husband. He wants to keep chickens for eggs and meat, but I couldn't kill or eat the animals I've cared for and lived with. I just couldn't.
He doesn't see what the fuss is about, however, and would happily prepare a dish with chicken breast from our own chicken  ::)

Many women don't want to have to do the slaughter and cleaning, but once it is in the refrigerator or freezer, there is no difference between store-bought or home grown, except that home grown usually tastes better!  

I grew up in a farm community where we raised chickens for home use as well as sale.  For a number of years, I did the "to freezer" operation.  It was either that or the family either didn't eat or did without something else...  I didn't enjoy it, but adopted a "Do what needs to be done" attitude - just like I had a task for any other employer that I didn't want to do, but it was assigned to me, so it got done!
Posted by: 2degreespisces, Tuesday, July 3, 2012, 3:54pm; Reply: 20
Conor, I beg to differ: I actually like chickens! We used to have these great big clucking hens when I was little, Brahma's they were http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahma_(chicken) and I loved them! So I really couldn't kill one, I think.

ABJoe, when it comes to fish I'll hook them, clean them and fry 'em up  ;D
It's the chickens that get to me. When you have a little group of them, they come to recognize you, they have their little characters.
Posted by: ABJoe, Tuesday, July 3, 2012, 3:55pm; Reply: 21
Quoted from Spring
I don't think it would ever work for me to try to raise any kind of living, breathing thing for food that could become a pet. My dad went through that with us when we were kids!!

When I exhibited an emotional statement to animals Dad was raising, he stated, "Don't get too attached to it, it has Deep-Freeze written on the side of it."  I think I was about 3 at the time, so I understood the don't get attached to it part, but the deep freeze part was understood later when I was putting them there... ;)
Posted by: gulfcoastguy, Tuesday, July 3, 2012, 4:18pm; Reply: 22
While I don't eat the demon bird we did raise turkeys. Our turkeys were pasture raised with plenty of bugs, grass, and a little grain and 3 acres to roam in. They just had a few bad seconds. Compare that to factory raisedchickens who are crammed into "fryer houses" so tight that they can't lie down and have to walk in their own waste. Slaughter actually seems like a sweet release to them. Meat doesn't grow on styrofoam trays. Hens can be kept for eggs but what about all of the extra roosters?
Posted by: Conor, Tuesday, July 3, 2012, 5:04pm; Reply: 23
Quoted from 2degreespisces
Conor, I beg to differ: I actually like chickens! We used to have these great big clucking hens when I was little, Brahma's they were http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahma_(chicken) and I loved them! So I really couldn't kill one, I think.

Yeah, I'm probably a little harsh on chickens due to the ornery flock of black-tailed Leghorns I had to help tend as a wee lad. Talk about bi-polar poultry. Now that I think about it, had I slipped some Prozac into their water supply they probably wouldn't have been the anxious, spastic, unfriendly creatures they were. ;)

The Brahma does look more like the kind of chicken I would've liked to have had around. This description is especially relevant: "Brahmas are calm, friendly birds that make good pets ..." as I'd most often get pecked and/or clawed when I tried to be friendly with our Leghorns. :-/
Posted by: 2degreespisces, Tuesday, July 3, 2012, 5:55pm; Reply: 24
Quoted from Conor

Yeah, I'm probably a little harsh on chickens due to the ornery flock of black-tailed Leghorns I had to help tend as a wee lad. Talk about bi-polar poultry. Now that I think about it, had I slipped some Prozac into their water supply they probably wouldn't have been the anxious, spastic, unfriendly creatures they were. ;)

The Brahma does look more like the kind of chicken I would've liked to have had around. This description is especially relevant: "Brahmas are calm, friendly birds that make good pets ..." as I'd most often get pecked and/or clawed when I tried to be friendly with our Leghorns. :-/


;D

I have to say, anxious, spastic and unfriendly Leghorns don't exactly sound like the animal from Heaven!
Brahma's are beautiful; very big, they move slowly, they're very friendly and their eggs are delicious. We had blue Brahma's, if my husband is up for it, I'd like to get three or four hens. He prefers smaller chickens though, so we'll see.
I'm not sure our two Border Collies would appreciate the intruders, will have to think about how to make sure everybody'll get along
(pray)
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