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BTD Forums  /  Cook Right 4 Your Type  /  Lloyd's Rice Milk Yoghurt
Posted by: Conor, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 6:28pm
Hi Lloyd, so are you really going to blog about this and then hold out on us by not sharing the recipe (or its instructions)?!? Please, enquiring minds want to know ;D ...

Quoted from Lloyd's Blog
My current recipe uses a bit of ghee and larch arabinogalactin. Both were added for thickness, the larch to provide extra food for the bacteria as well. There is a lot I still don’t know about yogurt and yogurt making. Experiments with the recipe over the coming months might be educational.
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 6:44pm; Reply: 1
try this invention which worked for me just fine

add a polyflora to a glass of compliant rice milk

add Lloyd s larch and ghee as well if you wish, once you get the yogurt consistency you wish
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 6:57pm; Reply: 2
Quoted from Lola
try this invention which worked for me just fine
add a polyflora to a glass of compliant rice milk
add Lloyd s larch and ghee as well if you wish, once you get the yogurt consistency you wish


Sounds soooo good!!! (smile)-----busy copying and pasting--------
Posted by: Lola, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 7:03pm; Reply: 3
report back your results :)
Posted by: Lloyd, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 7:28pm; Reply: 4
Quoted from Conor
Hi Lloyd, so are you really going to blog about this and then hold out on us by not sharing the recipe (or its instructions)?!? Please, enquiring minds want to know ;D ...



Moi?

As noted, I'm still experimenting with the recipe.

The amount of ARA that winds up in a daily serving of yogurt winds up to be about the amount of ARA I was using on a daily basis before I began using it in the yogurt, if that helps.  :D

It also helps to start with a thicker rice milk.  ;)
Posted by: Conor, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 8:52pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from Lloyd
It also helps to start with a thicker rice milk.

Do you blend/strain your own rice milk? Maybe 'Bob's Red Mill Sweet Brown Rice' would make a good base? Is chicory root extract (inulin) beneficial for you? It is for me, so I'm thinking I may experiment with adding it to the larch arabinogalactan as a thickening agent. Are you following the traditional culturing times for dairy yoghurts? Okay, enough 20 Questions. (:

Cheers!

P.S. Like the blog, and nice photography. Yours? (Oops, another question, sorry.) (whistle)
Posted by: Chloe, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 8:55pm; Reply: 6
Does this mixture have to be kept warm as in making regular yogurt?  I never made yogurt so please
excuse my clueless question.

I don't see any real instructions beyond listing the ingredients.
Posted by: Victoria, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 9:16pm; Reply: 7
A number of people on the Forum have reported making yogurt from nut, seed or grain 'milk'.  So far, I don't remember any of them saying whether or not the mixture ever actually thickens, and if so, how much.  That would be good to know so as to know what to watch for.

All yogurt cultures are going to need warmth in order to culture.  Some kefir strains do not need heat, but since we're talking yogurt, I'm assuming that a person would follow a similar procedure as you would with cow or goat milk.
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 9:16pm; Reply: 8
I don't think yogurt cares what state the milk is in as long as it is clean and without antibiotics and such - and not too warm or cold! (hugegrin) Back before BTD I used to use canned milk - skim or whole without doing anything except adding culture and warming. Easy as pie!! And also delicious!
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 9:20pm; Reply: 9
Culture at about 100 degrees. Too hot will "kill" it but don't throw it out because it will still be delicious in cereal etc.!
Posted by: Conor, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 9:28pm; Reply: 10
Sorry Chloe, meant to link to it in my original post but Lloyd mentioned in his blog posting that he used a yoghurt maker. I haven't seen one yet (for making yoghurt, that is) that doesn't incorporate a very low heat throughout inoculation and incubation. If you search Amazon, you'll find a wide variety of them. Like Victoria mentioned, kefir cultures at room temperature but most yoghurts require a higher temperature to culture (there are a few 'room temperature' ones, though).
Posted by: Chloe, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 9:44pm; Reply: 11
How long does this have to culture?  

Can anyone recommend a yogurt maker they are happy with?

Can't wait to try it.  
Posted by: Conor, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 9:55pm; Reply: 12
I like this one:

Because of the versatility the individual cups provide (BPA-free, too), its digital display and programmable timer, and I felt that the price was reasonable.

Culture time is typically 10-12 hours, depending upon the consistency and level of tartness you desire (i.e., the longer you let it culture, the thicker and tangier it will become).
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 10:05pm; Reply: 13
Quoted from Conor
but most yoghurts requires a higher temperature to culture (there are a few 'room temperature' ones, though).


It unnecessarily takes a lot longer at lower temps. Some people make a huge effort to make yogurt the consistency of purchased yogurt, but it is not required. Adding the ingredients already mentioned are what caught my attention! I like those suggestions. You don't have to purchase a yogurt maker to make yogurt.
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 10:11pm; Reply: 14
It doesn't always get "tangier" either. I decided to make soy yogurt in my oven some time ago just for kicks. Heated the oven to the lowest temp, turned it off, let it cool to the desired reading, put in the yogurt mixture, shut the door and left it twelve hours. It was totally delicious!! No sour taste. I could have eaten the entire batch it was so good! I have been making yogurt for over forty years - just thought I would mention that!! :D
Posted by: Lloyd, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 10:15pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from Conor

Do you blend/strain your own rice milk? Maybe 'Bob's Red Mill Sweet Brown Rice' would make a good base? Is chicory root extract (inulin) beneficial for you? It is for me, so I'm thinking I may experiment with adding it to the larch arabinogalactan as a thickening agent. Are you following the traditional culturing times for dairy yoghurts? Okay, enough 20 Questions. (:

Cheers!

P.S. Like the blog, and nice photography. Yours? (Oops, another question, sorry.) (whistle)


Thanks.

Just snap a few pics of things I cook from time to time. Sometimes the pics come out. Good thing I don't have to buy film or have it developed.

I make a thick milk from basmati rice. The basic recipe is cook it very soft (it eventually falls apart) and run it through a blender, then a strainer. You can fool around with how much water to how much rice.

What you suggest might work well.

So far, 14 hours cook time seems about right for what I'm doing.

Posted by: Lloyd, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 10:19pm; Reply: 16
Quoted from Chloe
How long does this have to culture?  

Can anyone recommend a yogurt maker they are happy with?

Can't wait to try it.  


Milk is faster. Maybe 10 hours? The way I'm doing it, 14 hours seems about right.

I got a yogurt maker so I wouldn't worry about it so much, especially with the longer culture time. There are other methods as others have mentioned.

Posted by: ruthiegirl, Thursday, June 28, 2012, 5:12pm; Reply: 17
Lloyd, I understand your hesitance to post anything to the recipe center until the recipe is perfected- I'm the same way. But I have started forum posts with details of culinary experiments (see my old cheese-making thread) and, numerous times, have given a narrative on some of my "throw together and don't measure anything" recipes.

Could you pretty please do the same with your rice milk yogurt? What have you tried that didn't work so well, and exactly what didn't you like about the results? What are you tweaking now, even if you don't know yet how this new change turns out?
Posted by: Lloyd, Friday, June 29, 2012, 12:39am; Reply: 18
Quoted from ruthiegirl
Lloyd, I understand your hesitance to post anything to the recipe center until the recipe is perfected


I've never actually posted anything to the recipe center. I have at times posted recipes or general directions, and welcomed other to post whatever they did with it to the recipe center.

No recipe is sacred. A few things that require some measurement I only deviate from with caution.

There are many paths that lead to a similar result here. Do what is comfortable for you. I can't advise you on culturing without a yogurt maker and yogurt makers come with good instructions.

However you seed the 'milk', add the larch at that time. I use the slurry method like one would adding flour to a hot liquid. Hope that helps.
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