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BTD Forums  /  Eat Right 4 Your Type  /  Bone broths
Posted by: BTypeAUS, Monday, June 25, 2012, 9:05am
Hi all.
does anyone make them? I make them for my son whos is Type O and has food allergies. I know they are very healthy for you ..just wondering if anyone else makes them and what they add? I just add a whole onion and remove when its done (I make lamb or chicken broth).
Posted by: Dianne, Monday, June 25, 2012, 10:28am; Reply: 1
I love the flavour of bay leaf so I add that only and sip it as is. If I make a soup with it later, then I add other spices and herbs. Is your son a blood type O?  :)
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Monday, June 25, 2012, 10:33am; Reply: 2
I use Sarah hopes method. her videos are very good for all that sort of thing. She uses the western A price book wise traditions for her stuff I believe.

For beef she uses onions, carrot and celery. after allowing the bones to soak in water with a bit of vinegar (I use lemon) in it to draw minerals from the bone then simmers for between 12 and 72 hours.

I do it for about 48 hours (using a smaller pot).

http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/videos/stock-broth-and-soups/
Posted by: BTypeAUS, Monday, June 25, 2012, 10:42am; Reply: 3
Yes Dianne he is ..a good book to read is nourishing traditions  :)
Posted by: Andrea AWsec, Monday, June 25, 2012, 2:24pm; Reply: 4
Smells awful when it cooks I put the crockpot outside- my husband  asked me who I thought was going to eat it when it was done.

I will use it instead of water to make rice-- he will never know. ;)
Posted by: Lola, Monday, June 25, 2012, 2:41pm; Reply: 5
http://www.jadeinstitute.com/jade/bone-broth-health-building.php
Posted by: Victoria, Monday, June 25, 2012, 6:54pm; Reply: 6
I don't add anything to them because I use the bone broth in cooking other things, which I may flavor any way I like.  

Beef knuckle bones are what I use because there is a lot of cartilage/collagen.  I slow cook a large grass-fed knuckle for 10 to 12 hours (or longer if I have the time), then strain, refrigerate and remove the solid fat layer before using in cooking.

I don't add lemon juice or vinegar - just bones, heat and lots of time.
Posted by: Conor, Wednesday, June 27, 2012, 9:18pm; Reply: 7
Quoted from PCUK-Positive

Thanks for the link ... helped me to know just how it should look. Have been meaning to include a cup of beef bone broth with breakfast, like the Japanese tradition of fish broth, and see if it will enhance the effects of cissus quadrangularis.
Posted by: yaeli, Thursday, June 28, 2012, 7:24am; Reply: 8
Quoted from Conor
Thanks for the link ... helped me to know just how it should look
:D A great way to start the day!, she says.

My God, she covers it all, everything! Doesn't she. What a thorough and exhaustive presentation, what a rare service. Some would say nudge, I salute. 8)

Posted by: Wholefoodie, Thursday, June 28, 2012, 11:56am; Reply: 9
Very informative link, Policy Checker. Thanks for sharing. Time to get back to making broth.

I buy my meat locally and can purchase bones, but even bones are pricey when grass fed and/or organic. This weekend I have to ask at the Farmers Market if they have any bones they could sell that they think no one would be interested in. Maybe some chicken feet or beef tails! (can't belief I can even think of cooking such things when I gagged on meat for years.)

Lisa
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Thursday, June 28, 2012, 5:21pm; Reply: 10
If I start with raw bones, it smells awful when cooking. If I start with  cooked bones (usually leftovers from turkey I've served to the family) then it smells delicious when cooking.

I usually put in an onion or two,  carrot peelings and/or ends (saved up during the week when I prepare carrots), garlic (often the smaller bits that are hard to cook with anyway) and sometimes a piece of ginger. I usually make soup or drink the broth plain, or use it to make gravy. The spices I add don't interfere with any of those uses.
Posted by: PCUK-Positive, Thursday, June 28, 2012, 5:53pm; Reply: 11
Hi Ruthie, I am not an expert on this subject but I wonder if treating the bone broth like a compost is the best way to go ;) unless your carrots are very organic and thoroughly cleansed the skin will contain any impurities and perhaps pesticides and eventually mould and bacteria if left around for any length of time.

if using raw bones it is very important to remove the scum that gatherers at the surface of the water in the early stages of cooking, these are all the impurities and sour tasting, once removed the broth is less harsh and perhaps will help yours.

I use (an it is generally recommended that all use) organic vegetables when making stock or broth especially if they are to be cooked for prolonged periods.

peace and love as always oxo
Posted by: BHealthy, Monday, September 17, 2012, 7:26pm; Reply: 12
I have been making bone broth for 30 some years....

The recipe I currently use is from The Cancer-Fightling Kitchen by Rebecca Katz.  I don't have cancer but thought the recipes used to cure it might also prevent it.  The broth recipes are called Magic Mineral Broths and are so good they can be eaten on their own.

The last time I made her chicken broth my MIL was here and it smelled so good she couldn't resist tasting it every time she walked by.  

It uses a whole (pasture-raised) chicken carcass, 6 carrots, 2 yellow onions, 2 leeks, 1 bunch celery, 2 sweet potatoes, 1 garnet yam, 8 cloves garlic, 1 bunch flat-leaf parsley, 12 black peppercorns, 4 whole alspice or juniper, 2 bay leaves, 1 T. vinegar or lemon juice, 1 t. sea salt, and 8 cups water.

The veggies are not peeled, just washed thoroughly (if you don't buy organic, you must peel them). Combine everything in large stock pot, bring to a boil, immediately decrease heat to low and skim scum.  Simmer, uncovered for at least 2 hours but as long as 24.  DO NOT LET IT BOIL.  Strain and refrigerate.  There is no point in eating either the meat or the veggies because all the flavor has been cooked out of them.    

The beef broth recipe is made with 3 pounds of bones.  All other ingredients stay the same.  The bones are first roasted at 350 for 30 minutes to brown them and then combined with the rest.  All other directions are the same.

After straining the stock, I remove the fat and then simmer it in smaller and smaller pans until it's been reduced by half or 3/4.  I then freeze it in ice-cube trays and use one or two cubes to make one cup of broth; or, I throw them into sauces to punch up the flavor. The reduced broth, called demi-glace, keeps much longer and takes up less space.

Since leeks and black pepper are now an avoid for me, I left them out of the last batch of beef broth and added some green onions.  I'm going to have to eliminate the sweet potatoes, too, because they're an avoid for DH.

I have other recipes that include tomatoes, mushrooms, and various herbs.  They're all delicious.  I would avoid using something really strong tasting, though, like turnips, broccoli or cabbage.  Fennel, however, would probably be really good.
Posted by: honeybee, Tuesday, September 18, 2012, 6:07am; Reply: 13
Quoted from BHealthy
Magic Mineral Broths


Love this!

And thanks for your recipes and tips - they are really helpful.
Posted by: Henriette Bsec, Tuesday, September 18, 2012, 8:01am; Reply: 14
Quoted from Victoria
I don't add anything to them because I use the bone broth in cooking other things, which I may flavor any way I like.  

Beef knuckle bones are what I use because there is a lot of cartilage/collagen.  I slow cook a large grass-fed knuckle for 10 to 12 hours (or longer if I have the time), then strain, refrigerate and remove the solid fat layer before using in cooking.

I don't add lemon juice or vinegar - just bones, heat and lots of time.


I do almost like this but I do add a little lemonjuice :)

I often use veal ( grass fed welfare) instead of beef in summer= lighter falvour and colour.

I boil my broth down so It is very concentrated and cut in sq when it is gelatine  and I freeze- that way I can take up just a square IF I am cooking a small portion.

I healed my leaky gut with beef/veal broth, cooked veggies. lots of butter and probiotics
Posted by: Elisabett, Tuesday, September 18, 2012, 1:53pm; Reply: 15
I see that often it is said to skim off the fat at top of soup.  That fat is CLA, which is very healthy, yes?  I take off some of it after it hardens and freeze it to use in future.  Am I on the correct path to believing that this fat is healthy?
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