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Posted by: 16796 (Guest), Monday, June 11, 2012, 3:28pm
My boyfriend is random with his sleep. He'll go for say a month on night hours then will stay up for a whole day and get back on day hours. When he sleeps he normally jumps up after 5 hours. If he works hard he can sleep for 8. Once it catches up with him he will sleep 10 hours maybe. He's always been this way. I don't know if its related to insomnia or what. His mom has fibromyalgia so it wouldn't surprise me if he were likely to get it. I know its less common in men but he is so very much like her. Anyone heard of anything like this?
Posted by: JJR, Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 5:08pm; Reply: 1
You guys are young.  I'm assuming.  We used to do all kinds of crazy things when we were young.  It's normal.  Is it the best for your health?  Probably not.  But I'm not sure there is an answer in the question that is helpful.  If he ever starts to have health problems, a good sleep pattern might be something he'll think about and possibly make some changes.  When I was 22, sleep was the last thing I was concerned with.  But, that's not to say it was wise to be like that.  You are wise to think about it.  But that's why they say Girls mature before boys.  You are proving that, at least in this situation.   ;D
Posted by: 16796 (Guest), Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 10:39pm; Reply: 2
I'm an unusual 22. Old at heart. See how I'm the youngest one here? :D. He is 29. I never understand men (boys really, they annoy me so much) that are my age. And sometimes I feel older than him. I'm guessing its all a combination of eating unhealthily, lack of discipline, and our household members being on all shifts. Just wanted to see if anyone else was this way
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 10:53pm; Reply: 3
I just want to warn you about dating an immature older man. I met my first husband when we were 19 and 29. We hit it off beautifully. But  a few years later, I grew up a lot and he stayed the same. We got along so well at first, but I still had growing up to do and he didn't- instead of us "growing up together" I feel like I "outgrew" him, if that makes any sense.

If you were dating an immature 22 or even 25 year old, I  wouldn't worry so much. He might still grow up. But if he's 29 and still immature, there may not be as much hope for him.

Of course, he's a different person than my ex husband and this may not apply to you. It's just something I think you should keep in the back of your mind if other problems arise in your relationship. Certainly take a hard look at his willingness to take responsibility for his own health  before considering marraige or starting a family with him.

I really can't comment on the weird sleeping habits. I've always needed a lot of sleep and that hasn't changed. Even as a teenager I couldn't pull all-nighters without crashing and catching up on the sleep within 2-3 days.
Posted by: Conor, Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 11:28pm; Reply: 4
There's some excellent sleep research that's been done in the past 10-15 years. Much of which is easy to find online. Some of what has been confirmed is the importance of a non-distracting sleep environment; six to seven-and-a-half hours sleep per night is sufficient for most adults (kids, tweens and teens need closer to 10 hours); natural sleep rhythms occur in 90-minute cycles (so, if you have no choice but to get less sleep one night, try to time your waking up at the end of a 90-minute cycle and you'll feel more refreshed on less sleep that if you'd slept for an additional 30-45 minutes but interrupted the subsequent cycle); eliminate lights (even digital clock lights) so necessary sleep hormones aren't diminished or interrupted; a 20-minute power nap during the day (aka stage 2 nap) is good to boost alertness and focus; the snooze button actually creates more stress for the body than rest, and shouldn't be used; et cetera.

Interesting ...

Quoted Text
To drop off we must cool off; body temperature and the brain's sleep-wake cycle are closely linked. That's why hot summer nights can cause a restless sleep. The blood flow mechanism that transfers core body heat to the skin works best between 18 and 30 degrees. But later in life, the comfort zone shrinks to between 23 and 25 degrees - one reason why older people have more sleep disorders.

Exposure to noise at night can suppress immune function even if the sleeper doesn’t wake. Unfamiliar noise, and noise during the first and last two hours of sleep, has the greatest disruptive effect on the sleep cycle.

Tiny luminous rays from a digital alarm clock can be enough to disrupt the sleep cycle even if you do not fully wake. The light turns off a "neural switch" in the brain, causing levels of a key sleep chemical to decline within minutes.

Some studies suggest women need up to an hour's extra sleep a night compared to men, and not getting it may be one reason women are much more susceptible to depression than men.

Scientists have not been able to explain a 1998 study showing that a bright light shone on the backs of human knees can reset the brain's sleep-wake clock.

Diaries from the pre-electric-light-globe Victorian era show adults slept nine to 10 hours a night with periods of rest changing with the seasons in line with sunrise and sunsets.
Posted by: JJR, Wednesday, June 13, 2012, 12:19am; Reply: 5
I've never ever, ever been a napper.  Ever.  My Mom was just telling me how even when we were pretty young, she'd make us lie down, and I'd just lay there for an hour with my eyes open, playing in bed or something.  Obviously I took them when I was a baby, but I was pretty young when they stopped.  

Is that natural?  IDK.  Maybe I was under stress, maybe I'm crazy.  Who knows.  But I just don't nap very well.  There were a few Sunday's I'd get one about 10 years ago.  But even that was really rare.  That doesn't really help the OP though.  I was just commenting about naps.

When I was young and wild, I never wanted to sleep.  I still don't go TO sleep very well.  My body just doesn't like to shut down early.  But I'll sleep in late, no problem.  
Posted by: Marc121, Wednesday, June 13, 2012, 6:03am; Reply: 6
If a day have 34 hours I`ll sleep for 17 hour daily.
Unfortunately its not, so I have to change myself to be with the rigth flow. :)
Posted by: 19504 (Guest), Thursday, July 12, 2012, 4:03pm; Reply: 7
If you were relationship an premature 22 or even 25 season old, I  wouldn't fear so much. He might still mature. But if he's 29 and still premature, there may not be as much wish for him. Of course, he's a different individual than my ex partner and this may not implement to you. It's just something I think you should keep in the returning of your thoughts if other issues occur in your connection.
Posted by: Spring, Friday, July 13, 2012, 12:22am; Reply: 8
Quoted Text
The blood flow mechanism that transfers core body heat to the skin works best between 18 and 30 degrees. But later in life, the comfort zone shrinks to between 23 and 25 degrees - one reason why older people have more sleep disorders.

What does this mean? If this is the norm, I shouldn't have ever slept in my life! 'Splain, man!
Posted by: yvonneb, Friday, July 13, 2012, 6:18am; Reply: 9
Quoted from Spring

What does this mean? If this is the norm, I shouldn't have ever slept in my life! 'Splain, man!


Could it be degrees CELSIUS rather than your american FAHRENHEIT?

Posted by: shoulderblade, Tuesday, July 17, 2012, 1:06am; Reply: 10
Quoted from 16796
My boyfriend is random with his sleep. He'll go for say a month on night hours then will stay up for a whole day and get back on day hours. When he sleeps he normally jumps up after 5 hours. If he works hard he can sleep for 8. Once it catches up with him he will sleep 10 hours maybe................................. Anyone heard of anything like this?

I think that pretty well everyone's sleep patterns are irregular to some extent. It might be a pattern like going short for awhile then playing 'catch up' with a night or two of long sleep or whatever. Usually someone will have a job or school schedule that will keep the variations in check.

I would think that if the volatility has no regular rhyme nor reason it might be something to look into. Even most shift workers can sustain a pattern even though they are 'out of phase' with day and night cycles.

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