Print Topic - Archive

BTD Forums  /  SWAMI Xpress  /  Cocoa every day instead of coffee; mate instead?
Posted by: Seraffa, Monday, June 11, 2012, 4:55am
This is still my first month of being SWAMI'd so I'd like to say:
It asked me to toss out coffee completely. So I did.
But my green tea couldn't help me "stay sharp" on the job, as we have to perform retail service for folks 9 hours straight for our customers, and concentration is important.
So cocoa came up as a neutral and I take it to work with me.
At first I took the bitter unsweetened baking chocolate.
Now it melts all over the place in summer and I see how much fat is in it.
So I'm getting dry cocoa and mixing a tsp. with a few drops of honey to make it go down my throat.

(Decent non-avoid almond milk is out of the question, as no one cares to make it in the "health food" world! We need to ask ourselves: who exactly is profiting from pumping in all that carageenan into our foods???)

I don't see mate listed as an avoid for me anywhere. Is it more sensible to use in this case? I can get it cheap at the local Mexican mart.
Posted by: Lola, Monday, June 11, 2012, 5:33am; Reply: 1
add a teaspoon of cocoa to your mate

I like adding some DGL licorish as well.....yumm
Posted by: Conor, Monday, June 11, 2012, 5:38am; Reply: 2
Hi Seraffa, if I had to choose one or the other, I'd likely go with yerba mate as a 'focus' drink. Couple of things to remember, though. Don't use boiling water; the steeping water should be at white or green tea temperature, no hotter. Another thing, yerba mate tastes better (to me) when prepared the traditional way, i.e., barely moisten the leaves with cold water for about a minute before you cover them with hot water. Also, if you'll use a bombilla through which to sip the mate, you can wet the leaves multiple times before discarding them (thus, maximizing your yerba mate ROI). :)


Posted by: Lola, Monday, June 11, 2012, 5:46am; Reply: 3
even my German hubby is hooked on the mate now......

we used to drink coffee like there was no tomorrow

viva D Adamo to have opened our eyes to those ingrained paradigms, making us toxic
Posted by: Possum, Monday, June 11, 2012, 5:48am; Reply: 4
Cute guy!! I learned as a sales rep for coffee & tea companies that 85o was the highest temperature to make both coffee & tea... I was therefore quite excited to find I could buy a kettle that had a colour temperature code & a cut off point at 85o... However on delivery, I was so disappointed to see that the window/colour gauge was completely made of plastic & the first time I used it it smelt so badly of plastic fumes I sent it back ::) ??)
Posted by: Conor, Monday, June 11, 2012, 6:02am; Reply: 5
Quoted from Possum
However on delivery, I was so disappointed to see that the window/colour gauge was completely made of plastic & the first time I used it it smelt so badly of plastic fumes I sent it back ::) ??)

Hi Possum, here's the kettle I use (and very much like) ...
Posted by: Possum, Monday, June 11, 2012, 6:06am; Reply: 6
;)
Posted by: Seraffa, Monday, June 11, 2012, 6:15am; Reply: 7
Quoted from Lola
add a teaspoon of cocoa to your mate

I like adding some DGL licorish as well.....yumm


Rocket fuel? (drool)
Posted by: Conor, Monday, June 11, 2012, 6:20am; Reply: 8
Quoted from Lola
even my German hubby is hooked on the mate now......

Will try not to hijack this thread Lola but, strangely enough, one of my favorite memories from living in Germany was of buying fresh lychees from the street vendors in the dead of winter, and walking through snowy streets whilst munching on this amazing tasting Asian fruit. (drool) I think part of it was just the stark incongruity of it all.

(Oh, yeah, SWAMI has informed me that I may no longer partake of lychees. Oh well, at least I lived dangerously for a moment!) ;D
Posted by: 19000 (Guest), Monday, June 11, 2012, 12:27pm; Reply: 9
I read once that eating an apple wakes you up better than coffee.  Don't know how true that is.
Posted by: Victoria, Monday, June 11, 2012, 5:32pm; Reply: 10
Seraffa,
Mate is a great idea, if it's compatible with your SWAMI.  It should be listed under beverages.  If not listed, it's a Neutral.

Many people drink 'black cocoa', in the same way that they would drink black coffee.  1 Tb or so of unsweetened cocoa in a cup of hot water.  I did it myself for several years at one point in my dietary evolution.  The stark simplicity of it grows on you and it's a nice pick-me-up.  You can also add a sprinkle of lecithin and a small dab of ghee to enrich the taste and texture.

As Lola said, the combination of the two (mate and cocoa) is a winner also.

Why not make your own almond milk by soaking a cup of almonds overnight, draining, rinsing and blending with an equal amount of filtered water.  Strain through a very fine mesh strainer.  It's easy and tasty.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Monday, June 11, 2012, 7:06pm; Reply: 11
I like to put cocoa powder into my yerba mate. I also add molasses and sometimes homemade rice milk to make it creamier. It's even yummier with homemade almond milk,  but SWAMI says I'm not supposed to drink that.

Unsweetened baking chocolate works fine for a snack (if I'm in that kind of a mood) or melted into brownies, melted with molasses added then let to harden and eat as a chocolate "bar" etc. But for putting into hot beverages, cocoa powder works a million times better.

After my "mocha mate" I drink green tea. I brew 4 cups at once, let sit for a minute or so, and drink it iced with lemon or grapefruit juice added (16oz cup). This gets all the caffeine into the first cup of green tea. Then I brew the same tea leaves (or bags) once or twice more, for additional cups of iced green tea (and all the antioxidants, etc) but it helps me have my caffeine earlier in the day, as the later cups of tea are caffeine free. Between the mate, the chocolate, and the green tea, I'm getting my caffeine early in the day.

Before BTD, I drank a cup of coffee first thing in the mornings. When I first switched to green tea, I had trouble because I couldn't get enough caffeine early in the day, getting headaches, and if I drank it too late it would interfere with sleep.
Posted by: Seraffa, Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 2:13am; Reply: 12
Just got my mate and cocoa fix tonight and feel NORMAL again.

Oh no! I should have been saving my green tea bags all along?
I thought all the "good stuff" came out of them in the first 45 seconds.
Posted by: Conor, Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 3:42am; Reply: 13
Quoted from Seraffa
I thought all the "good stuff" came out of them in the first 45 seconds.

First brew is consider more yang; second brew more yin ...

How to Steep Chinese Loose Leaf Teas*

Gunpowder: Green Tea

Once processed, this popular tea has the shape of pellets. It's typically made from a mix of new leaves and old, and consequently, drinkers should steep the pellets on the lower end of the green tea temperature range. Once exposed to hot water, the pellets unravel to reveal beautiful leaves.
  • 170°F for 3 minutes on the first steeping.
  • Add additional 15 seconds for subsequent uses.

Dragonwell: Green Tea

One of the most famous of China's green teas, Dragonwell has a forgiving and accessible steeping temperature and time range. The leaves have a distinctly jade color with a delicate fold along the vein.
  • 180ºF - 185ºF for 3 minutes on the first steeping.
  • Add additional 15 seconds for subsequent uses.

Snowy Mountain Jian: Green Tea

This slightly-sweet tea has a pungent, smooth flavor. Dark green with silvery tips, Snowy Mountain Jian has a selective picking process that makes it comparable to first-flush teas.
  • 180ºF for 2 minutes and 30 seconds.
  • Add additional 30 seconds for subsequent uses.

Kai Hua Long Ding: Green Tea

Another popular green tea from China, Kai Hua Long Ding has a strong grassy flavor that increases with the steeping time. Those more sensitive to the flavor might want to steep on the lower end of the time range.
  • 175ºF for 2-3 minutes.
  • Add additional 15 seconds for subsequent uses.

Hyson Lucky Dragon: Green Tea

This green tea is made with twisted leaves that unfurl during steeping. This tea has forgiving steeping conditions and makes for a soft grassy flavor, very amenable to novice green tea drinkers.
  • 175°F - 180°F for 3 minutes.
  • Add additional 30 seconds for subsequent uses.

Xin Yang Mao Jian: Green Tea

One of the most famous Chinese teas, Xin Yang Mao Jian has a light, sweet taste and a delicate aroma. The brewing temperature and steeping time is on the lower end of the spectrum for green teas due to the delicacy of the leaves.
  • 158°F - 176º for 1 minute.
  • The second use also requires a 1 minute steeping time. Add 15 seconds for the third and all additional uses.

Hou Kui: Green Tea

These tea leaves are emerald with beautiful veining. Growers process the tea by pressing it in cloth, which also gives the leaves a criss-cross pattern. This popular tea gained renown for its light floral flavor and sweet aftertaste. As a result of its delicacy, Hou Kui has a finnicky steeping time and temperature.
  • 158ºF to 176ºF for 1 minute.
  • The second use also requires a 1 minute steeping time. Add 15 seconds for the third and all additional uses.

*Courtesy of Teaosophy

Quoted Text
Turning Over a New Leaf

You may already appreciate the satisfying taste and relaxation benefits of tea, but did you know tea can be used to....

Sooth Skin — The tannins in tea leaves are said to have soothing properties for the skin. Try applying a cooled, infused pod to sunburns, rashes, mosquito bites, and even shaving nicks to ease discomfort.

Treat your Plants — Tea can be used as a fertilizer for both indoor and outdoor plants. Leftover brewed tea can be cooled and used to "water" houseplants on occasion, and infused tea leaves can be distributed in your flower garden for a nutrient boost.

Tidy Up — Because tea absorbs moisture and odors, you can place dry tea bags in shoes and other unpleasant smelling places to remove odors. Infused tea pods can be placed in your refrigerator to help keep food odors in check.

Clean Your Mirrors — Leftover brewed tea can be cooled and used to get mirrors squeaky clean. Use a soft cloth to buff away the tea after cleaning.

Posted by: Lola, Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 5:47am; Reply: 14
when I lived in Germany and Austria, I used to munch on chestnuts

guess Lychees is a sign of our globalized planet!!! ;D
Posted by: Seraffa, Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 9:24pm; Reply: 15
Quoted from Conor

First brew is consider more yang; second brew more yin ...

How to Steep Chinese Loose Leaf Teas*

Gunpowder: Green Tea

Once processed, this popular tea has the shape of pellets. It's typically made from a mix of new leaves and old, and consequently, drinkers should steep the pellets on the lower end of the green tea temperature range. Once exposed to hot water, the pellets unravel to reveal beautiful leaves.
  • 170°F for 3 minutes on the first steeping.
  • Add additional 15 seconds for subsequent uses.

Dragonwell: Green Tea

One of the most famous of China's green teas, Dragonwell has a forgiving and accessible steeping temperature and time range. The leaves have a distinctly jade color with a delicate fold along the vein.
  • 180ºF - 185ºF for 3 minutes on the first steeping.
  • Add additional 15 seconds for subsequent uses.

Snowy Mountain Jian: Green Tea

This slightly-sweet tea has a pungent, smooth flavor. Dark green with silvery tips, Snowy Mountain Jian has a selective picking process that makes it comparable to first-flush teas.
  • 180ºF for 2 minutes and 30 seconds.
  • Add additional 30 seconds for subsequent uses.

Kai Hua Long Ding: Green Tea

Another popular green tea from China, Kai Hua Long Ding has a strong grassy flavor that increases with the steeping time. Those more sensitive to the flavor might want to steep on the lower end of the time range.
  • 175ºF for 2-3 minutes.
  • Add additional 15 seconds for subsequent uses.

Hyson Lucky Dragon: Green Tea

This green tea is made with twisted leaves that unfurl during steeping. This tea has forgiving steeping conditions and makes for a soft grassy flavor, very amenable to novice green tea drinkers.
  • 175°F - 180°F for 3 minutes.
  • Add additional 30 seconds for subsequent uses.

Xin Yang Mao Jian: Green Tea

One of the most famous Chinese teas, Xin Yang Mao Jian has a light, sweet taste and a delicate aroma. The brewing temperature and steeping time is on the lower end of the spectrum for green teas due to the delicacy of the leaves.
  • 158°F - 176º for 1 minute.
  • The second use also requires a 1 minute steeping time. Add 15 seconds for the third and all additional uses.

Hou Kui: Green Tea

These tea leaves are emerald with beautiful veining. Growers process the tea by pressing it in cloth, which also gives the leaves a criss-cross pattern. This popular tea gained renown for its light floral flavor and sweet aftertaste. As a result of its delicacy, Hou Kui has a finnicky steeping time and temperature.
  • 158ºF to 176ºF for 1 minute.
  • The second use also requires a 1 minute steeping time. Add 15 seconds for the third and all additional uses.

*Courtesy of Teaosophy




Thanks Connor; HOWEVER, because of all the "gentrification" of various food items in today's marketing endeavors, I get very irritated at the viewing of sites like Teaosophy, et al, because they literally make a mountain out of a molehill. It's very pretentious of this particular generation to think that people didn't even know how to brew  tea before they were born. Ergo - you see every single fricking tea on the market now saying in bold letters "HOW TO BREW TEA" on its boxes. For a couple thousand years people didn't go round with a thermometer in one hand worrying about this or that. (And the tea still came out fine.)
Posted by: Seraffa, Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 9:34pm; Reply: 16
Just a note: we probably have all this tea drinking instruction frenzy because we have bottled water, bottled sports drinks, bottled energy drinks, bottled starbucks, and all the aspartame you could ever wish to die from now on every corner instead of what was available 30 years ago: regular soda, coffee, TEA, Tab, and Diet Coke. See how mindless aspartame has made our culture become, severing neural connections?

I rest my case. No offense to Connor.
Posted by: ruthiegirl, Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 9:37pm; Reply: 17
My method of brewing green tea is to put 2 teaspoons of dry tea into my strainer (strainer in my mug) and then fill the cup with hot water from my hot water urn (or, if I heat up water special for this since my urn is wearing out, I make sure the water is hot but not boiling.) Brew it until I remember it, which is anywhere from 3 to 20 minutes. Pour tea into a large  glass filled with ice. Pour more hot water over the leaves in the mug, and then add lemon juice and proberry syrup to the cup. I usually add grapefruit juice to  the second cup. Occasionally I'll brew the leaves a 3rd time.

Sometimes I get creative and add lavendar and/or peppermint to the loose tea, but my lazy brewing method remains the same.
Posted by: Seraffa, Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 9:37pm; Reply: 18
Time for a mate-and-green-tea break. *whew*
P.S.: It's okay for Connor to call me "Granny S." if he really wants to  ;D
Posted by: Conor, Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 10:35pm; Reply: 19
Quoted from Seraffa
Ergo - you see every single fricking tea on the market now saying in bold letters "HOW TO BREW TEA" on its boxes. For a couple thousand years people didn't go round with a thermometer in one hand worrying about this or that. (And the tea still came out fine.)

I understand your point. Too, I posted them just as much to note the diversity of the various green teas. However, I'm surprised by how many people today still are unaware that it's anathematic to pour boiling water over green tea. I think it's because pre-WWII China and Japan provided the bulk of green and oolong teas to the U.S. At that time, our tea consumption was 40-percent green tea (the only kind of tea specifically noted in Deep South cookbooks for making 'sweet tea'), 35-percent black tea and 25-percent oolong tea. Once we became involved in WWII and the tea trade with China and Japan was terminated, the Indian trade route became our sole means of obtaining tea. India produced only black tea, though, and, as a result, black tea became the dominant tea consumed in the U.S. for the last half century plus. Which is why most everyone only learned how to brew the black tea that was primarily sold pre-packaged in tea bags (of course, there was also that abomination called "instant tea").

I think it's kind of interesting that colonists in the mid-1700s drank, on average, at least two cups of tea a day, and we're just now finding our way back to this practice due more to the health benefits tea has been shown to provide. I imagine the descendants of East India Company's founders sure would like for the company to still be in business today.
Posted by: grey rabbit, Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 11:02pm; Reply: 20
Quoted from Lola
when I lived in Germany and Austria, I used to munch on chestnuts

guess Lychees is a sign of our globalized planet!!! ;D


I'd forgotten about the chestnut vendors in Italia! There is nothing that compares to fresh roasted chestnuts :)

Interesting about tea, sometimes I forget to drink it.

Seraffa, what is your genotype that you are an A that can have no coffee?
Posted by: Victoria, Tuesday, June 12, 2012, 11:45pm; Reply: 21
I think that a lot of people don't have a clue how to brew green tea because they are used to pouring boiling water on black teabags and letting them steep for hours.  And many people who tell me they are drinking green tea - I discover that they're buying bottled, sweetened, flavored green tea.
Posted by: Conor, Wednesday, June 13, 2012, 12:04am; Reply: 22
Quoted from grey rabbit
I'd forgotten about the chestnut vendors in Italia! There is nothing that compares to fresh roasted chestnuts :)

Wandering Piazza Navona on a winter's night munching on warm chestnuts from a paper cone. Meraviglioso! (joytears)
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, June 13, 2012, 12:29am; Reply: 23
Quoted from ruthiegirl
I like to put cocoa powder into my yerba mate.


I think if I had cocoa with yerba maté I would go straight into orbit!! It makes me very jittery all by itself!!!  :o
Posted by: Possum, Wednesday, June 13, 2012, 12:39am; Reply: 24
Quoted from Conor
I think it's kind of interesting that colonists in the mid-1700s drank, on average, at least two cups of tea a day, and we're just now finding our way back to this practice due more to the health benefits tea has been shown to provide. I imagine the descendants of East India Company's founders sure would like for the company to still be in business today.
Didn't tea become a dirty word in America, sometime after that??!! I'm surprised Boston Bun didn't at he same time - or maybe you guys always called it something different anyway?! :D

Posted by: Conor, Wednesday, June 13, 2012, 1:21am; Reply: 25
Quoted from Possum
Didn't tea become a dirty word in America, sometime after that??!! I'm surprised Boston Bun didn't at the same time - or maybe you guys always called it something different anyway?! :D

Yep, tea consumption declined significantly after the American Revolution. I'm not sure about the other. Is it what y'all call a Sally Lunn (or Sally Lynn?), with something like coconut-flavored frosting on top? Kiwi made us a batch of them once and I'm pretty sure that's what she called them. The only thing my seanmhair would serve with tea was a type of tea cake she baked. They looked kind of like miniture bread loaves. Not too sweet, either.
Posted by: Spring, Wednesday, June 13, 2012, 2:09am; Reply: 26
Neighbors didn't immediately have a friend sit down to a cup of tea during an emotional upheaval for nothing!
Posted by: Possum, Wednesday, June 13, 2012, 2:24am; Reply: 27
Yes I guess a Sally Lynne would be an equivalent... (altho' not being a native Kiwi, I'm not too sure?!) I was having a jibe about the Boston tea party... :D
Print page generated: Saturday, December 20, 2014, 2:39pm