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BTD Forums  /  SWAMI Xpress  /  Farmer's Cheese unavailable in NZ. What is it?
Posted by: 18884 (Guest), Thursday, June 7, 2012, 7:45am
I've never seen a cheese with that name in NZ.  What kind of cheese is it?  Would like to know as it's listed as beneficial for Type A, Non-Secretors.

Thanks :)
Posted by: Possum, Thursday, June 7, 2012, 9:59am; Reply: 1
Hi Strawbs, nor have I - I think it is easy to make... ;) What part of NZ are you in?
Posted by: Goldie, Thursday, June 7, 2012, 12:47pm; Reply: 2
Do you have quark? I wish we had it here..  

Farmer chesese is like cottage just drier.. http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Can_you_make_farmers_cheese_from_cottage_cheese
Posted by: Ribbit, Thursday, June 7, 2012, 3:59pm; Reply: 3
There are two types of farmers cheese.  One is what Goldie described.  It usually comes in a package that kind of looks like tofu.  The other is more like cheddar cheese.  It's got a stronger flavor.  I only know of two stores where you can get the harder, aged farmers cheese.  I've never been quite sure which is the kind Dr. D tested, but since most people have only heard of the softer, fresher kind, I assume that's what he tested.
Posted by: Conor, Thursday, June 7, 2012, 4:18pm; Reply: 4
Farmer's cheese is a generic sort of name that can, basically, refer to a variety of soft cheeses that are not aged but eaten fresh. For example, soft chèvre from goat milk is a type of farmer's cheese.

The process to get to farmer's cheese goes something like this: dairy milk (cow, goat or sheep) >> cottage cheese (firmed up curds but still contains liquid and cannot be sliced) >> pot cheese (formed up into single mass, less liquid, but still cannot be sliced ... at least, not easily) >> farmer's cheese (firmer, drier and can be sliced but still quite soft ... and not aged).

As farmer's cheese can be made with a variety of animal milks, I think it key to find out which cheeses from which animals tend to show up in your 'avoids' list; e.g., if feta cheese is an avoid, look to see of other sheep (or goat) milk cheeses are listed as avoids. There is also the possibility, though, that a cheese is an avoid not because of the milk origin but because of the brining/curing process of the cheese in question. So, this is another factor to examine.

I also have a recipe for a basic farmer's cheese that uses cow milk, if you're interested in making your own. It's not terribly labor intensive, but it does require multiple steps.
Posted by: C_Sharp, Sunday, June 10, 2012, 7:25pm; Reply: 5
Quoted from Ribbit
There are two types of farmers cheese.  One is what Goldie described.  It usually comes in a package that kind of looks like tofu.  The other is more like cheddar cheese.  It's got a stronger flavor.  I only know of two stores where you can get the harder, aged farmers cheese.  I've never been quite sure which is the kind Dr. D tested, but since most people have only heard of the softer, fresher kind, I assume that's what he tested.


This is the description for the cheese in typebase. I assume it is what Farmer's cheese is in all the books.

Quoted Text
This fresh cheese is a form of COTTAGE CHEESE from which most of the liquid has been pressed. The very dry farmer cheese is sold in a solid loaf. It has a mild, slightly tangy flavor and is firm enough to slice or crumble. It's an all-purpose cheese that can be eaten as is or used in cooking.

Posted by: Possum, Sunday, June 10, 2012, 11:33pm; Reply: 6
Strawbs - I just saw paneer cheese in a more gourmet type supermarket in Wellington (Moore Wilsons) if you are down Sth of the North Island?!
Posted by: rangtang, Wednesday, June 13, 2012, 10:10am; Reply: 7
i live in auckland and paneer is pretty available at the local fuit and vege stores  like 'green fresh' these days seems pretty close to farmers cheese?
Posted by: san j, Sunday, June 17, 2012, 2:08am; Reply: 8
I'd add that the cottage cheese type of farmer's cheese is a bit drier than cc, yes, but it also tends to have very tiny curds (as opposed to cc's large OR "small" ones), so it's rather more spreadable...like some ricotta.
:-/ Maybe this only confused you more?
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